CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] 3 NZLR 289

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 1018

Court

Country

NEW ZEALAND

Name

Court of Appeal

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Chambers, Robertson and Baragwanath JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

NEW ZEALAND

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

24 March 2009

Status

Final

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Article 15 Decision or Determination

Order

Article 15 declaration granted

HC article(s) Considered

3 5 15

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 5 15

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
A.J. v. F.J. 2005 SC 428; Application of Adan 437 F 3d 381 (2006); Re B. (A minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 (CA); Black v. Taylor [1993] 3 NZLR 403 (CA); Re C. (Child abduction) (Unmarried father: rights of custody) [2003] 1 FLR 252; Re D. (A child) (Abduction: custody rights) [2006] All ER (D) 355 (May) (CA); Re D. (A child) (Abduction: rights of custody) [2007] 1 AC 619; [2007] 1 All ER 783; Dellabarca v Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 (CA); Re F. (A minor) (Abduction: custody rights abroad) [1995] Fam 224; Gross v. Boda [1995] 1 NZLR 569 (CA); Hunter v Murrow [2005] 3 FCR 1; [2005] 2 FLR 1119 (CA); Re J. (A minor) (Abduction: custody rights), Re [1990] 2 AC 562; L v. A [2004] NZFLR 298; M v. H [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623; MW v. Director-General of the Department of Community Services (2008) 244 ALR 205 (HCA); Re O. (Abduction: custody rights) [1997] 2 FLR 702; Re P. (Abduction: consent) [2004] 2 FLR 1057; Sonderup v. Tondelli (South Africa, Case CCT 53/00, 4 December 2000); Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551; Re V.-B. (Abduction: custody rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192; Re W. (minors) (abduction: father's rights) [1999] Fam 1; White v. Northumberland [2006] NZFLR 1105 (CA).
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
Article 15 Decision or Determination
Inchoate Rights of Custody
New Zealand Case Law

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The child, a boy, aged eleven and a half at the date of the alleged wrongful removal, was born in New Zealand in September 1996. The parents never married but cohabited from two months after the boy's birth until late 1999 / early 2000. In 2007 the parents agreed a parenting plan with the aid of a court appointed counsellor, under which the father was to have care of the child for two days and then four days on alternate weeks.

The plan was never embodied in a formal court order. In February 2008 the mother took the child to Australia. The father then sought to secure the return of the child pursuant to the Hague Convention. In June 2008 the Australian Central Authority asked its New Zealand counterpart for an Article 15 declaration as to whether the removal was wrongful.

On 24 November 2008 the High Court issued alternative conclusions given that it could not determine disputed questions of fact:

(a)  If the parents had been living together as de facto partners at the time of the birth then the father would be a guardian of the child with custody rights, rendering the removal wrongful;
(b)  If the parents had not been living together as de facto partners then the mother would be the sole guardian and so entitled to remove the child unilaterally.

The father appealed the second conclusion.

Ruling

Appeal allowed; article 15 declaration granted.  The applicant father was considered to hold rights of custody under New Zealand law.

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

The father submitted that even if he was not a guardian, he had acquired custody rights either under the parenting plan, or, by virtue of the fact he had been caring for the child in a parental role and, but for the removal, would have been able to apply to court to perfect the arrangement. These inchoate rights were sufficient to constitute custody rights under New Zealand domestic law.
 

Article 15 Decision or Determination

The Court of Appeal gave detailed consideration to the role and operation of Article 15 of the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention. The majority (Chambers and Robertson JJ.) held that the High Court had erred in its appreciation of the function of Article 15. The latter provision was to enable a court in the requested State to obtain a decision or determination from a court in the State of the child's habitual residence as to the domestic law of that State.

The requested court was not entitled to go further since the classification of a removal as "wrongful" was a matter for the court in the requested State in light of its assessment of the autonomous law of the Convention. On the facts of the case therefore, the determination of whether the removal was wrongful was a matter exclusively for the Australian courts and was to be determined in accordance with Australian case law.

The majority noted that the House of Lords had given consideration to the role of Article 15 in Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 880]. Their lordships had accepted that it was appropriate to seek the views of the requested court on Convention questions as well as the status of domestic law; opinions on the latter issue were ordinarily to be conclusive, save in cases of fraud or a breach of natural justice, but as regards the Convention question regard would be paid to the prevailing international understanding of the Convention's terms.

The majority in the New Zealand Court of Appeal rejected this assessment (cf. the dissenting judgment of Baragwanath J.); it held that no court ever analysed the wrongfulness of a child's removal from its jurisdiction in Convention terms. The majority suggested that the effect of the House of Lords' approach would be to encourage Article 15 decisions or determination, and it had the further consequence of ordinarily rendering the opinion of the requesting court binding on the courts of the requested State.

The majority expressed its support for the position taken by the English Court of Appeal in Re D. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 866] as well as in the earlier decision of Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 809]. The majority reaffirmed that only domestic law issues should be considered within an Article 15 request.

It further suggested that such requests should only rarely be made as between Australia and New Zealand, given the similarities of the legal systems. Furthermore, in the instant case the request was inappropriate given that crucial facts were in dispute.

Notwithstanding these findings, the majority went onto consider the domestic law issues raised because it did not wish to leave the ruling of the High Court as an authority. It therefore turned to consider whether the father had rights of custody if he was not the guardian of the child. In this it had to consider whether the parenting plan was an agreement having legal effect, (cf. the dissenting judgment of Baragwanath J.).

The majority found that, as a matter of New Zealand law, if both parents abided by the plan it had practical effect, and if one ceased to abide by it, the other could apply to the Family Court to have it embodied in a court order and then enforced. In reaching this conclusion the majority noted that legislative policy was to encourage private ordering of child care disputes and if such agreements could not be relied upon then judicial approval would always have to be sought.

The majority recalled that the issue of whether the plan amounted to an agreement having legal effect for the purposes of Article 3 was a matter for the Australian courts. It was argued for the mother that even if the parenting plan was an agreement having legal effect, it did not confer on the father the right to determine the child's place of residence.

Such a right, in her view, had to exist alongside rights relating to the care of the child, to satisfy the terms of Article 5 of the Convention. Relying on existing New Zealand authority, (Dellabarca v. Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 295]) the majority held that the right to determine the child's place of residence was not a necessary qualification of a right of custody.

All three members of the Court of Appeal panel criticised the High Court for not following this authority, but the majority did leave open the possibility that the issue could be reconsidered in the future. Baragwanath J. in his dissenting judgment explored the matter further, finding that from the perspective of the Convention there had to be real doubt as to whether in the cases of Gross v. Boda [1995] NZFLR 49 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 66] and Dellabarca v Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 295] the rights of the applicant fathers were sufficient to meet the requisite autonomous standard to be "rights of custody".

Nevertheless, he submitted that given the evolution in the status afforded to unmarried fathers in many legal systems reliance should be placed on Article 32 of the Vienna Convention of the Law of Treaties so that a father who shared the care of a child equally with the mother's agreement should be treated as having joint rights of custody for Convention purposes. In this he added that the interests of the child which ultimately underlie the Convention could not be achieved if one was able to remove the child from his settled day-to-day care.

The majority therefore concluded that the father, even if not a guardian, held under the parenting plan rights of custody under New Zealand law. It was not necessary therefore to consider the issue of inchoate rights arising from the father's care of the child. However, it was on this basis that Baragwanath J. found that the father held rights of custody: the mother as guardian parent, in conferring equal custody responsibility to the father, could be said to have granted him legal rights which could not be withdrawn by a peremptory removal.

INCADAT comment

Article 15 Decision or Determination

The Role and Interpretation of Article 15

Article 15 is an innovative mechanism which reflects the cooperation which is central to the 1980 Hague Convention.  It provides that the authorities of a Contracting State may, prior to making a return order, request that the applicant obtain from the authorities of the child's State of habitual residence a decision or other determination that the removal or retention was wrongful within the meaning of Article 3 of the Convention, where such a decision or determination may be obtained in that State. The Central Authorities of the Contracting States shall so far as practicable assist applicants to obtain such a decision or determination.

Scope of the Article 15 Decision or Determination Mechanism

Common law jurisdictions are divided as to the role to be played by the Article 15 mechanism, in particular whether the court in the child's State of habitual residence should make a finding as to the wrongfulness of the removal or retention, or, whether it should limit its decision to the extent to which the applicant possesses custody rights under its own law.  This division cannot be dissociated from the autonomous nature of custody rights for Convention purposes as well as that of 'wrongfulness' i.e. when rights of custody are to be deemed to have been breached.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The Court of Appeal favoured a very strict position with regard to the scope of Article 15:

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court held that where the question for determination in the requested State turned on a point of autonomous Convention law (e.g. wrongfulness) then it would be difficult to envisage any circumstances in which an Article 15 request would be worthwhile.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 866].

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

Whilst there was unanimity as to the utility and binding nature of a ruling of a foreign court as to the content of the rights held by an applicant, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, further specified that the foreign court would additionally be much better placed than the English court to understand the true meaning and effect of its own laws in Convention terms.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

A majority in the Court of Appeal, approving of the position adopted by the English Court of Appeal in Hunter v. Morrow, held that a court seised of an Article 15 decision or determination should restrict itself to reporting on matters of national law and not stray into the classification of a removal as being wrongful or not; the latter was exclusively a matter for the court in the State of refuge in the light of its assessment of the autonomous law of the Convention. 

Status of an Article 15 Decision or Determination

The status to be accorded to an Article 15 decision or determination has equally generated controversy, in particular the extent to which a foreign ruling should be determinative as regards the existence, or inexistence, of custody rights and in relation to the issue of wrongfulness.

Australia
In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

The court noted that a decision or determination under Article 15 was persuasive only and that it was ultimately a matter for the French courts to decide whether there had been a wrongful removal.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court of Appeal held that an Article 15 decision or determination was not binding and it rejected the determination of wrongfulness made by the New Zealand High Court: M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1021]. In so doing it noted that New Zealand courts did not recognise the sharp distinction between rights of custody and rights of access which had been accepted in the United Kingdom.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 866].

The Court of Appeal declined to accept the finding of the Romanian courts that the father did not have rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

The House of Lords held unanimously that where an Article 15 decision or determination was sought the ruling of the foreign court as to the content of the rights held by the applicant must be treated as conclusive, save in exceptional cases where, for example, the ruling had been obtained by fraud or in breach of the rules of natural justice. Such circumstances were absent in the present case, therefore the trial court and the Court of Appeal had erred in disregarding the decision of the Bucharest Court of Appeal and in allowing fresh evidence to be adduced.

As regards the characterisation of the parent's rights, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, held that it would only be where this was clearly out of line with the international understanding of the Convention's terms, as might well have been the case in Hunter v. Murrow, should the court in the requested state decline to follow it. For his part Lord Brown affirmed that the determination of content and classification by the foreign court should almost invariably be treated as conclusive.

Switzerland
5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953].

The Swiss supreme court held that a finding on custody rights would in principle bind the authorities in the requested State.  As regards an Article 15 decision or determination, the court noted that commentators were divided as to the effect in the requested State and it declined to make a finding on the issue.

Practical Implications of Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Recourse to the Article 15 mechanism will inevitably lead to delay in the conduct of a return petition, particularly should there happen to be an appeal against the original determination by the authorities in the State of habitual residence. See for example:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

This practical reality has in turn generated a wide range of judicial views.

In Re D. a variety of opinions were canvassed. Lord Carswell affirmed that resort to the procedure should be kept to a minimum. Lord Brown noted that it would only be used on rare occasions. Lord Hope counselled against seeking perfection in ascertaining whether a removal or retention was wrongful, rather a balance had to be struck between acting on too little information and searching for too much. Baroness Hale noted that when a country first acceded to the Convention Article 15 might be useful in cases of doubt to obtain an authoritative ruling on the content and effect of the local law.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

The majority in the Court of Appeal, suggested that Article 15 requests should only rarely be made as between Australia and New Zealand, given the similarities of the legal systems.

Alternatives to Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Whilst courts may simply wish to determine the foreign law in the light of the available information, an alternative is to seek expert evidence.  Experience in England and Wales has shown that this is far from fool-proof and does not necessarily result in time being saved, see: 

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1020].

In the latter case Thorpe L.J. suggested that greater recourse could be made to the European Judicial Network, through the International Family Law Office at the Royal Courts of Justice. Pragmatic advice could be offered as to the best route to follow in a particular case: whether to go for a single joint expert; whether to go for an Article 15 decision or determination; or whether to go for an opinion from the liaison judge as to the law of his own country, an opinion that would not be binding but which would perhaps help the parties and the trial court to see the weight, or want of weight, in the challenge to the plaintiff's ability to cross the Article 3 threshold.

Inchoate Rights of Custody

The reliance on 'inchoate custody rights', to afford a Convention remedy to applicants who have actively cared for removed or retained children, but who do not possess legal custody rights, was first identified in the English decision:

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 4],

and has subsequently been followed in that jurisdiction in:

Re O. (Child Abduction: Custody Rights) [1997] 2 FLR 702, [1997] Fam Law 781 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 5];

Re G. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2002] 2 FLR 703 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 505].

The concept has been the subject of judicial consideration in:

Re W. (Minors) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/Uke 503];

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 504];

Re G. (Child Abduction) (Unmarried Father: Rights of Custody) [2002] EWHC 2219 (Fam); [2002] ALL ER (D) 79 (Nov), [2003] 1 FLR 252 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 506].

In one English first instance decision: Re J. (Abduction: Declaration of Wrongful Removal) [1999] 2 FLR 653 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 265], it was questioned whether the concept was in accordance with the decision of the House of Lords in Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 2] where it was held that de facto custody was not sufficient to amount to rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

The concept of 'inchoate custody rights', has attracted support and opposition in other Contracting States.

The concept has attracted support in a New Zealand first instance case: Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 471].

However, the concept was specifically rejected by the majority of the Irish Supreme Court in the decision of: H.I. v. M.G. [1999] 2 ILRM 1; [2000] 1 IR 110 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 284].

Keane J. stated that it would go too far to accept that there was 'an undefined hinterland of inchoate rights of custody not attributed in any sense by the law of the requesting state to the party asserting them or to the court itself, but regard by the court of the requested state as being capable of protection under the terms of the Convention.'

The Court of Justice of the European Union has subsequently upheld the position adopted by the Irish Courts:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

In its ruling the European Court noted that the attribution of rights of custody, which were not accorded to an unmarried father under national law, would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the mother. 

This formulation leaves open the status of ‘incohate rights’ in a EU Member State where the concept had become part of national law.  The United Kingdom (England & Wales) would fall into this category, but it must be recalled that pursuant to the terms of Protocol (No. 30) on the Application of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union to Poland and to the United Kingdom (OJ C 115/313, 9 May 2008), the CJEU could not in any event make a finding of inconsistency with regard to UK law vis-a-vis Charter rights. 

For academic criticism of the concept of inchoate rights see: Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' Oxford, OUP, 1999, at p. 60.

New Zealand Case Law

A very wide interpretation has been given to rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention by the New Zealand courts.  Notably, a right of intermittent possession and care of a child has been regarded as amounting to a right of custody as well as being an access right. It has been held that there is no convincing reason for postulating a sharp dichotomy between the concepts of custody and access.

Gross v. Boda [1995] 1 NZLR 569 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 66];

Dellabarca v. Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 295];

Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 471].

This interpretation has been expressly rejected elsewhere, see for example:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe @809@].

Faits

L'enfant, un garçon âgé de onze ans et demi au moment du déplacement  dont le caractère illicite était allégué, était né en Nouvelle-Zélande en septembre 1996. Les parents ne se sont jamais mariés mais ont cohabité de deux mois après la naissance du garçon jusqu'à fin 1999 / début 2000. En 2007, avec l'aide d'un conseiller désigné par le tribunal, les parents se sont mis d'accord sur un plan parental conférant au père la garde de l'enfant alternativement 2 et 4 jours par semaine.

Le plan ne fut jamais formellement inscrit dans une ordonnance de tribunal. En février 2008, la mère emmena l'enfant en Australie. Le père chercha à obtenir le retour de l'enfant en vertu de la Convention de La Haye. En juin 2008, l'Autorité centrale australienne demanda à son équivalent néozélandais une déclaration selon l'article 15 pour savoir si le déplacement serait considéré comme illicite en droit néozélandais.

Le 24 novembre 2008, la Haute Cour (High Court) a présenté des conclusions alternatives puisqu'il ne lui appartenait pas de trancher des questions factuelles faisant l'objet de contestations :

(a) Si les parents vivaient ensemble comme partenaires de fait au moment de la naissance, alors le père était gardien de l'enfant avec un droit de garde, de quoi il résulterait que le déplacement était illicite ;
(b) Si les parents ne vivaient pas ensemble comme partenaires de fait, alors la mère était seule gardienne et par conséquent autorisée à déplacer l'enfant unilatéralement.

Le père fit appel contre la seconde conclusion.

Dispositif

Appel accueilli ; déclaration selon l'article 15 prononcée. Le père demandeur fut considéré comme détenteur d'un droit de garde en droit néozélandais.

Motifs

Droit de garde - art. 3


Le père a affirmé que même s'il n'était pas gardien, il avait acquis un droit de garde soit en vertu du plan parental, soit en vertu du fait qu'il s'était occupé de l'enfant en jouant un rôle parental et que si le déplacement n'avait pas eu lieu, il aurait eu le droit de demander au tribunal de parfaire cet arrangement. Ce droit implicite ne suffisait pas à constituer un droit de garde en droit national néozélandais.

 

Décision ou attestation selon l'article 15


La Cour d'appel s'est intéressée en détail au rôle et au fonctionnement de l'article 15 de la Convention de La Haye sur l'enlèvement d'enfants. La majorité (les juges Chambers et Robertson) a estimé que l'interprétation de la fonction de l'article 15 par la Haute Cour était erronée. Cette dernière disposition était destinée à permettre à un tribunal de l'État requis d'obtenir d'un tribunal dans l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant une décision relative au droit national de cet État.

Le tribunal requis n'était pas autorisé à aller plus loin puisque l'appréciation du caractère « illicite » du déplacement revenait au tribunal de l'État requis à la lumière de son analyse du droit autonome de la Convention. Concernant les faits de l'affaire, la détermination du caractère illicite du déplacement revenait donc exclusivement aux juridictions australiennes et devait se faire conformément à la jurisprudence australienne.

La majorité nota que la Chambre des Lords (House of Lords) avait pris en compte le rôle de l'article 15 dans sa décision Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880]. Les Lords avaient accepté de demander au tribunal requis son point de vue sur les questions relatives à la Convention ainsi que sur le statut du droit national ; les opinions sur ce dernier point devaient d'ordinaire être définitives, sauf en cas de fraude ou de manquement à la justice naturelle, mais en ce qui concerne les questions relatives à la Convention, l'interprétation internationale majoritaire des termes de la Convention était également prise en compte.

La majorité de la Cour d'appel de Nouvelle-Zélande (New Zealand Court of Appeal) rejeta cette analyse (cf. le jugement dissident du juge Baragwanath) ; elle estima qu'aucune juridiction n'avait analysé le caractère illicite du déplacement d'un enfant de son État en se fondant sur les termes de la Convention.

La majorité indiqua que l'approche de la Chambre des Lords aurait pour effet d'encourager les décisions selon l'article 15 et pour conséquence supplémentaire de rendre l'opinion de la juridiction requérante contraignante pour les juridictions de l'État requis. La majorité exprima son soutien à la position prise par la Cour d'appel anglaise dans Re D. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 866] ainsi que dans la décision plus ancienne Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La majorité réaffirma que seules les questions de droit national devaient être prises en compte dans le cadre d'une demande selon l'article 15. Elle suggéra de plus que de telles demandes ne devraient être effectuées que rarement entre l'Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande en raison de la similarité des systèmes juridiques. De plus, dans le cas d'espèce, la demande était inappropriée étant donné que des faits cruciaux faisaient l'objet de contestations.

Nonobstant ces conclusions, la majorité se pencha également sur les questions de droit national soulevées car elle ne souhaitait pas que la décision de la Haute Cour fasse autorité. Elle a donc cherché à savoir si le père disposait d'un droit de garde s'il n'était pas gardien de l'enfant. Pour ce faire, elle dut déterminer si un plan parental était un accord ayant un effet en droit (cf. le jugement dissident du juge Baragwanath).

La majorité conclut qu'en droit néozélandais, si les deux parents respectaient le plan, il avait un effet en pratique, et que si l'un d'entre eux cessait de s'y conformer, l'autre pouvait demander au tribunal de la famille (Family Court) son inscription dans une ordonnance et son exécution. Dans cette conclusion, la majorité nota que la politique législative était d'encourager le règlement privé de contentieux relatifs à la garde d'enfants et que dans les cas où on ne pouvait s'appuyer sur de tels accords, une approbation judiciaire devait toujours être demandée.

La majorité rappela que la question de savoir si le plan avait valeur d'accord à effet juridique au sens de l'article 3 était du ressort des juridictions australiennes. Il fut avancé pour la mère que même si un plan parental était un accord à effet juridique, il ne conférait pas au père le droit de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant. Un tel droit devait à ses yeux exister en parallèle du droit portant sur les soins de la personne de l'enfant pour satisfaire aux termes de l'article 5 de la Convention. S'appuyant sur un précédent néozélandais, (Dellabarca v. Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 295]) la majorité estima que le droit de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant ne constituait pas nécessairement un droit de garde.

Les trois membres du panel de juges de la Cour d'appel critiquèrent le non-respect de ce précédent par la Haute Cour, mais la majorité laissa ouverte la possibilité de réexaminer la question à l'avenir. Dans son jugement dissident, le juge Baragwanath explora la question plus avant, concluant que du point de vue de la Convention, un doute réel existait au sujet des décisions Gross v. Boda [1995] NZFLR 49 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 66] et Dellabarca v Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 295] pour savoir si les droits des pères demandeurs suffisaient à remplir les critères autonomes requis caractérisant un « droit de garde ».

Il indiqua toutefois qu'étant donné l'évolution du statut des pères non-mariés dans de nombreux systèmes juridiques, il faudrait se référer à l'article 32 de la Convention de Vienne sur le droit des traités afin qu'un père partageant à égalité les soins de l'enfant avec l'accord de la mère puisse être traité comme s'il disposait d'un droit de garde conjoint au sens de la Convention. Dans ce sens il ajouta que l'intérêt de l'enfant, qui est la finalité ultime de la Convention, ne pourrait pas être garanti si quelqu'un avait le droit de déplacer l'enfant de son environnement quotidien établi.

La majorité a donc conclu que le père, même sans être gardien, disposait en vertu du plan parental d'un droit de garde en droit néo-zélandais. Il n'était donc pas nécessaire d'examiner la question du droit implicite découlant des soins apportés par le père à l'enfant. Pour le juge Baragwanath c'est toutefois sur ce fondement que le père jouissait d'un droit de garde : il pouvait être considéré qu'en conférant une responsabilité égale au père, la mère, parent gardien, lui avait transmis un droit qui ne pouvait lui être enlevé par un déplacement unilatéral.

Commentaire INCADAT

Décision ou attestation selon l'article 15

Rôle et interprétation de l’article 15

L’article 15 constitue un mécanisme innovant qui traduit la coopération, élément central au fonctionnement de la Convention Enlèvement d’enfants de 1980. Cet article prévoit la possibilité pour les autorités d’un État contractant, avant de déposer une demande de retour, d’exiger que le demandeur obtienne, le cas échéant, de la part des autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant, une décision ou autre attestation constatant le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non‑retour de l’enfant au sens de l’article 3 de la Convention. Les Autorités centrales des États contractants doivent, dans la mesure du possible, aider les demandeurs à obtenir cette décision ou attestation.

Portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 aux fins d’obtention de décisions ou d’attestations

Les États de tradition de common law sont divisés quant au rôle du mécanisme de l’article 15. Ils s’interrogent en particulier quant à la nature de la décision ; le tribunal de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant doit-il statuer sur le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ou se contenter d’établir si le demandeur est bel et bien titulaire du droit de garde en vertu du droit interne ? Cette distinction est indissociable de l’interprétation autonome du droit de garde et du caractère « illicite » aux fins de la Convention, autrement dit estime-t-on que le droit de garde a été violé.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

La Cour d’appel s’est prononcée en faveur d’une position très stricte quant à la portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 :

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour a conclu qu’il était difficile d’envisager des circonstances dans lesquelles une demande aux fins de l’article 15 peut avoir une quelconque utilité, si la demande d’attestation dans l’État requis a trait à un point d’interprétation autonome de la Convention (par ex., le caractère illicite).

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 866].

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Si l’utilité et le caractère contraignant d’une décision d’un tribunal étranger portant sur l’étendue des droits du demandeur ont fait l’unanimité, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a insisté sur le fait que le tribunal étranger était bien mieux placé qu’un tribunal anglais pour comprendre les véritables signification et effet de ses propres lois aux termes de la Convention.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

Se ralliant à la décision de la Cour d’appel anglaise dans l’affaire Hunter v. Morrow, la Cour d’appel néo-zélandaise a conclu, à la majorité, qu’un tribunal saisit d’une demande de décision ou d’attestation aux fins de l’article 15 devrait se contenter de consigner les questions relevant du droit national et ne pas s’aventurer à classer le déplacement comme illicite ou non. Ce dernier point relève exclusivement de la compétence des tribunaux de l’État de refuge, compte tenu de l’interprétation autonome de la Convention.

Statut d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le statut qu’il convient d’accorder à une décision ou attestation de l’article 15 s’est également révélé source de controverse, en particulier eu égard à la nature ou non probante d’une décision étrangère eu égard à l’existence ou non du droit de garde et quant au caractère illicite.

Australie

In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

La Cour a estimé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était qu’indicative et qu’il appartenait aux tribunaux français de déterminer si le déplacement était illicite.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour d’appel a jugé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était pas probante et a réfuté les conclusions de la Haute Cour néo-zélandaise quant au caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour : M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1021]. Ce faisant, elle a indiqué que les tribunaux néo-zélandais ne reconnaissaient pas la distinction entre les droits de garde et d’accès, distinction admise au Royaume-Uni.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 866].

La Cour d’appel a refusé les conclusions des tribunaux roumains indiquant que le père ne disposait pas du droit de garde en vertu de la Convention.

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

La Chambre des Lords a conclu à l’unanimité qu’en cas de demande de décision ou d’attestation en vertu de l’article 15, la décision du tribunal étranger quant à l’étendue du droit du demandeur doit être, sauf circonstances exceptionnelles (par ex. si la décision résulte d’une fraude ou viole les principes élémentaires de justice), considérée comme probante. Il n’existait en l’espèce aucune circonstance exceptionnelle, le tribunal de première instance et la Cour d’appel ont dont commis une erreur en ne tenant pas compte de la décision de la Cour d’appel de Bucarest et en autorisant la production de nouvelles preuves.

Pour ce qui est de la détermination des droits du parent, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a estimé que le tribunal de l’État requis pouvait refuser de s’y conformer, uniquement lorsque cette détermination est clairement contraire à l’interprétation internationale de la Convention, comme cela a pu être le cas dans l’affaire Hunter v. Murrow. Pour sa part, Lord Brown a jugé que la détermination des droits et du caractère illicite devait, en toutes circonstances, être jugée probante.

Suisse

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953].

La Cour suprême suisse a jugé qu’une conclusion quant au droit de garde serait, en principe, contraignante pour les autorités de l’État requis. Pour ce qui est des décisions ou attestations de l’article 15, la Cour a indiqué que les avis parmi les commentateurs étaient partagés quant à leurs effets et a refusé de se prononcer sur la question.

Conséquences pratiques d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le recours au mécanisme de l’article 15 provoquera inéluctablement des retards dans le cadre de la demande de retour, en particulier lorsque la décision ou attestation d’origine fait l’objet d’un appel interjeté par les autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle. Voir par exemple :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Cette réalité pratique a à son tour généré une grande quantité d’opinions de juges.

L’affaire Re D. a suscité de nombreuses opinions. Lord Carswell a affirmé qu’il conviendrait de limiter au minimum le recours à cette procédure. Lord Brown a indiqué qu’un tel mécanisme ne serait utilisé qu’à de rares occasions. Lord Hope a conseillé d’éviter de rechercher la perfection dans l’examen du caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ; il conviendrait selon lui d’établir un juste milieu entre le fait d’agir sur base d’informations trop faibles et d’en solliciter trop. La Baronne Hale a indiqué qu’en cas d’adhésion récente d’un État à la Convention, l’article 15 pouvait, en cas de doute, s’avérer utile aux fins d’obtention d’une décision contraignante sur le contenu et les effets du droit local.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

La Cour d’appel a, à la majorité, estimé que les demandes au titre de l’article 15 ne devraient être utilisées que très rarement entre l’Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande, compte tenu de la similarité de ces deux ordres juridiques.

Solutions alternatives à une demande aux fins de l’article 15

Dans les cas où les tribunaux souhaitent simplement établir quel est le droit étranger à la lumière des informations disponibles, le recours à un expert en la matière peut apparaître comme une solution de rechange. L’expérience en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles a montré que cette méthode est loin d’être infaillible et qu’elle ne permet pas toujours de gagner du temps, voir :

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1020].

Dans ce dernier cas, le juge Thorpe a émis l’avis que l’on pourrait plus souvent recourir au Réseau judiciaire européen, par l’intermédiaire du Bureau international du droit de la famille au sein de la Royal Courts of Justice. Des conseils pratiques pourraient ainsi être émis quant à la meilleure marche à suivre dans un cas particulier : recourir conjointement à un unique expert ; solliciter une décision ou attestation en vertu de l’article 15 ; solliciter l’opinion d’un juge de liaison concernant le droit de son État, opinion qui ne serait pas contraignante mais qui pourrait aider les parties et le tribunal à distinguer le poids des arguments ou des intentions dans la contestation de la faculté du plaignant à remplir les conditions établies à l’article 3.

Droit de garde implicite

La notion de « droit de garde implicite », laquelle permet à certaines parties non-gardiennes s'étant activement occupées d'enfants finalement déplacés ou retenus à l'étranger de faire utilement valoir une demande de retour sur le fondement de la Convention a vu le jour dans l'affaire Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 4].

La notion a été réutilisée dans :

Re O. (Child Abduction : Custody Rights) [1997] 2 FLR 702, [1997] Fam Law 781 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 5];

Re G. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2002] 2 FLR 703 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 505].

Le concept de droit de garde implicite a également été discuté dans :

Re W. (Minors) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/Uke 503];

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 504];

Re G. (Child Abduction) (Unmarried Father: Rights of Custody) [2002] EWHC 2219 (Fam); [2002] ALL ER (D) 79 (Nov), [2003] 1 FLR 252 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 506].

Dans une autre décision anglaise de première instance, Re J. (Abduction: Declaration of Wrongful Removal) [1999] 2 FLR 653 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 265], la question s'était posée de savoir si ce concept était conforme à la décision de la Chambre des Lords dans l'affaire Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 2]. Dans cette espèce, il fut considéré que la garde factuelle d'un enfant ne suffisait pas à représenter un véritable droit de garde au sens de la Convention.

Le concept de « droit de garde implicite » a été diversement accueilli à l'étranger.

Il a été bien accueilli dans la décision néo-zélandaise rendue en première instance dans l'affaire Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 471].

Toutefois, ce concept a été clairement rejeté par la majorité de la cour suprême irlandaise dans l'affaire H.I. v. M.G. [1999] 2 ILRM 1; [2000] 1 IR 110 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 284]. Keane J. a estimé que « ce serait aller trop loin que de considérer que de mystérieux droits de garde implicites non reconnus officiellement par le droit de l'État requérant à une juridiction ou une partie les invoquant puissent être regardés par les juridictions de l'État requis comme susceptible de bénéficier de la protection conventionnelle. » [Traduction du Bureau Permanent]

La Cour de justice de l'Union européenne a confirmé par la suite la position adoptée par les tribunaux irlandais:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a indiqué dans sa décision que l'attribution des droits de garde, qui en vertu de la législation nationale ne pouvaient être attribués à un père non marié, serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux de la mère.

Cette formulation laisse ouverte la question du statut du droit de garde implicite dans un État membre de l'Union européenne lorsque ce concept a été intégré au droit national. C'est le cas du Royaume-Uni (Angleterre et Pays de Galles), mais il convient de rappeler que conformément au Protocole (No 30) sur l'application de la Charte des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne à la Pologne et au Royaume-Uni (OJ C 115/313, 9 Mai 2008), la CJUE ne pourrait en aucun cas constater une incompatibilité du droit britannique vis-à-vis de la Charte.

Pour une critique de ce droit, voir : P. Beaumont. et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 60.

Jurisprudence néo-zélandaise - droit de garde

Les juridictions néo-zélandaises ont adopté une interprétation très large de la notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention. En particulier le droit de vivre avec l'enfant par intermittence a été considéré à la fois comme un droit de garde et un droit de visite.  Il a été décidé qu'il n'y avait pas de raison de postuler une dichotomie stricte entre droit de garde et droit de visite.

Gross v. Boda [1995] 1 NZLR 569 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 66]

Dellabarca v. Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 295]

Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 471].

Une telle interprétation a été expressément rejetée dans d'autres États contractants. Voir par exemple :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].