CASE

No full text available

Case Name

M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623

INCADAT reference

HC/E/NZ 1021

Court

Country

NEW ZEALAND

Name

High Court

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Panckhurst, Chisholm JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Requested State

NEW ZEALAND

Decision

Date

21 March 2005

Status

Final

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

Order

Appeal dismissed, granting of Article 15 declaration confirmed

HC article(s) Considered

3 5

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 5

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Gross v. Boda [1995] NZFLR 49; Dellabarca v. Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548; Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641; Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 (CA).
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?
Actual Exercise
Article 15 Decision or Determination

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The child, a boy, was almost four years old at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. He had spent his entire life in New Zealand. His parents were not married and had ended their relationship eight months prior to the birth. Following the birth the father had regular contact with his son.

In late September 2004 the mother took the child to London. Several weeks later she advised the father that she intended to remain there. On 29 October 2004 the father filed a return petition with the New Zealand Central Authority. Return proceedings were issued in the High Court in London on 15 November 2004.

At a hearing on 16 December 2004 it was agreed that the father would obtain from a competent New Zealand court a determination of his rights in relation to the child and a decision on whether the removal had been wrongful within the meaning of Articles 3 and 5. On 21 February 2005 the Family Court of New Zealand ruled that the father had rights of custody and that the removal was wrongful. The mother appealed.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and Article 15 declaration granted; the removal had been in breach of the father's actually exercised rights of custody.

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3


Having reviewed the two decisions of the Court of Appeal in Gross v. Boda [1995] NZFLR 49 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 66] and Dellabarca v Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 295] the High Court noted that in New Zealand the concept "rights of custody" was to be given a broad meaning.

Where access entailed substantial intermittent rights to the possession and care of a child then it may be found that rights of custody reposed in the particular parent would be established. The Court noted that this conclusion was seemingly at odds with the approach followed in England.

On the facts the father's access did not extend to overnight care of the child. But, over a period of some years he had exercised regular access on either three or two days of each week and for periods of some hours. There had always been a defined and committed relationship between the two. This was held to constitute substantial intermittent possession and care of the child.

The Court further held that for the purposes of New Zealand law an agreement as to custody could be in an informal, oral form. There simply had to be proper evidence to establish the nature of the arrangements, and evidence to show that the relevant rights of custody were being exercised at the time of removal. Moreover, it was held that that an agreement did not have to be enforceable before it could have "legal effect" for the purposes of Article 3.

INCADAT comment

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Actual Exercise

Courts in a variety of Contracting States have afforded a wide interpretation to what amounts to the actual exercise of rights of custody, see:

Australia
Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 68];

Austria
8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof, 30/10/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 548];

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 545];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. Cour d'Appel at Aix en Provence (6e Ch.) 23 March 1989, 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529 note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° 5704759 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 704];

CA Aix en Provence 8/10/2002, L. v. Ministère Public, Mme B et Mesdemoiselles L (N° de rôle 02/14917) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 509];

Germany
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 822];

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 491];

New Zealand
The Chief Executive of the Department for Courts for R. v. P., 20 September 1999, Court of Appeal of New Zealand [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 304];

United Kingdom - Scotland
O. v. O. 2002 SC 430 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 507].

In the above case the Court of Session stated that it might be going too far to suggest, as the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit had done in Friedrich v Friedrich that only clear and unequivocal acts of abandonment might constitute failure to exercise custody rights. However, Friedrich was fully approved of in a later Court of Session judgment, see:

S. v S., 2003 SLT 344 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 577].

This interpretation was confirmed by the Inner House of the Court of Session (appellate court) in:

AJ. V. FJ. 2005 CSIH 36, 2005 1 S.C. 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803].

Switzerland
K. v. K., Tribunal cantonal de Horgen [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CZ 299];

449/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 433];

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953];

United States of America
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 82];

Sealed Appellant v. Sealed Appellee, 394 F.3d 338 (5th Cir. 2004), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 779];

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

See generally Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E., 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 84 et seq.

Article 15 Decision or Determination

The Role and Interpretation of Article 15

Article 15 is an innovative mechanism which reflects the cooperation which is central to the 1980 Hague Convention.  It provides that the authorities of a Contracting State may, prior to making a return order, request that the applicant obtain from the authorities of the child's State of habitual residence a decision or other determination that the removal or retention was wrongful within the meaning of Article 3 of the Convention, where such a decision or determination may be obtained in that State. The Central Authorities of the Contracting States shall so far as practicable assist applicants to obtain such a decision or determination.

Scope of the Article 15 Decision or Determination Mechanism

Common law jurisdictions are divided as to the role to be played by the Article 15 mechanism, in particular whether the court in the child's State of habitual residence should make a finding as to the wrongfulness of the removal or retention, or, whether it should limit its decision to the extent to which the applicant possesses custody rights under its own law.  This division cannot be dissociated from the autonomous nature of custody rights for Convention purposes as well as that of 'wrongfulness' i.e. when rights of custody are to be deemed to have been breached.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The Court of Appeal favoured a very strict position with regard to the scope of Article 15:

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court held that where the question for determination in the requested State turned on a point of autonomous Convention law (e.g. wrongfulness) then it would be difficult to envisage any circumstances in which an Article 15 request would be worthwhile.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 866].

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

Whilst there was unanimity as to the utility and binding nature of a ruling of a foreign court as to the content of the rights held by an applicant, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, further specified that the foreign court would additionally be much better placed than the English court to understand the true meaning and effect of its own laws in Convention terms.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

A majority in the Court of Appeal, approving of the position adopted by the English Court of Appeal in Hunter v. Morrow, held that a court seised of an Article 15 decision or determination should restrict itself to reporting on matters of national law and not stray into the classification of a removal as being wrongful or not; the latter was exclusively a matter for the court in the State of refuge in the light of its assessment of the autonomous law of the Convention. 

Status of an Article 15 Decision or Determination

The status to be accorded to an Article 15 decision or determination has equally generated controversy, in particular the extent to which a foreign ruling should be determinative as regards the existence, or inexistence, of custody rights and in relation to the issue of wrongfulness.

Australia
In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

The court noted that a decision or determination under Article 15 was persuasive only and that it was ultimately a matter for the French courts to decide whether there had been a wrongful removal.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court of Appeal held that an Article 15 decision or determination was not binding and it rejected the determination of wrongfulness made by the New Zealand High Court: M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1021]. In so doing it noted that New Zealand courts did not recognise the sharp distinction between rights of custody and rights of access which had been accepted in the United Kingdom.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 866].

The Court of Appeal declined to accept the finding of the Romanian courts that the father did not have rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

The House of Lords held unanimously that where an Article 15 decision or determination was sought the ruling of the foreign court as to the content of the rights held by the applicant must be treated as conclusive, save in exceptional cases where, for example, the ruling had been obtained by fraud or in breach of the rules of natural justice. Such circumstances were absent in the present case, therefore the trial court and the Court of Appeal had erred in disregarding the decision of the Bucharest Court of Appeal and in allowing fresh evidence to be adduced.

As regards the characterisation of the parent's rights, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, held that it would only be where this was clearly out of line with the international understanding of the Convention's terms, as might well have been the case in Hunter v. Murrow, should the court in the requested state decline to follow it. For his part Lord Brown affirmed that the determination of content and classification by the foreign court should almost invariably be treated as conclusive.

Switzerland
5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953].

The Swiss supreme court held that a finding on custody rights would in principle bind the authorities in the requested State.  As regards an Article 15 decision or determination, the court noted that commentators were divided as to the effect in the requested State and it declined to make a finding on the issue.

Practical Implications of Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Recourse to the Article 15 mechanism will inevitably lead to delay in the conduct of a return petition, particularly should there happen to be an appeal against the original determination by the authorities in the State of habitual residence. See for example:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

This practical reality has in turn generated a wide range of judicial views.

In Re D. a variety of opinions were canvassed. Lord Carswell affirmed that resort to the procedure should be kept to a minimum. Lord Brown noted that it would only be used on rare occasions. Lord Hope counselled against seeking perfection in ascertaining whether a removal or retention was wrongful, rather a balance had to be struck between acting on too little information and searching for too much. Baroness Hale noted that when a country first acceded to the Convention Article 15 might be useful in cases of doubt to obtain an authoritative ruling on the content and effect of the local law.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

The majority in the Court of Appeal, suggested that Article 15 requests should only rarely be made as between Australia and New Zealand, given the similarities of the legal systems.

Alternatives to Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Whilst courts may simply wish to determine the foreign law in the light of the available information, an alternative is to seek expert evidence.  Experience in England and Wales has shown that this is far from fool-proof and does not necessarily result in time being saved, see: 

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1020].

In the latter case Thorpe L.J. suggested that greater recourse could be made to the European Judicial Network, through the International Family Law Office at the Royal Courts of Justice. Pragmatic advice could be offered as to the best route to follow in a particular case: whether to go for a single joint expert; whether to go for an Article 15 decision or determination; or whether to go for an opinion from the liaison judge as to the law of his own country, an opinion that would not be binding but which would perhaps help the parties and the trial court to see the weight, or want of weight, in the challenge to the plaintiff's ability to cross the Article 3 threshold.

Faits

L'enfant, un garçon, était âgé de près de quatre ans à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Il avait jusqu'alors vécu en Nouvelle-Zélande. Ses parents n'étaient pas mariés et s'étaient séparés huit mois avant la naissance de l'enfant. Le père entretenait des contacts réguliers avec son fils depuis la naissance.

Fin septembre 2004, la mère emmena l'enfant à Londres. Plusieurs semaines plus tard, elle annonça au père qu'elle avait l'intention de rester en Angleterre. Le 29 octobre 2004, le père demanda le retour de l'enfant auprès de l'Autorité centrale néo-zélandaise. La High Court de Londres fut saisie le 15 novembre 2004.

Lors d'une audience, le 16 décembre 2004, il fut demandé au père d'obtenir d'un juge néo-zélandais une attestation de son droit sur l'enfant et une déclaration portant sur le caractère licite ou non du déplacement au sens des articles 3 et 5. Le 21 février 2005, un juge aux affaires familiales néo-zélandais décida que le père avait un droit de garde et que le déplacement était illicite. La mère interjeta appel.

Dispositif

Appel rejeté et déclaration selon l'article 15 prononcée ; le déplacement intervenait en violation du droit de garde effectivement exercé par le père.

Motifs

Droit de garde - art. 3


Après avoir examiné les deux décisions de la juridiction suprême néo-zélandaise, Gross v. Boda [1995] NZFLR 49 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 66] et Dellabarca v. Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 295], la High Court releva que le droit néo-zélandais entendait le concept de « droit de garde » selon un sens large.

Lorsque le droit de visite incluait le droit de prendre de temps en temps l'enfant et de s'en occuper, le parent concerné pouvait être considéré comme ayant un droit de garde. La Cour releva que cette conclusion semblait en contradiction avec l'approche du droit britannique.

Les faits indiquent que le droit de visite du père ne s'étendait pas aux soins de nuit de l'enfant. Cependant, sur une période de plusieurs années, il avait régulièrement rendu visite à son fils pendant quelques heures, trois ou deux jours par semaine. Ainsi, le père et le fils avaient toujours entretenu des relations stables et clairement établies. Il a donc été considéré que le père prenait de temps en temps l'enfant et s'en occupait.

La Cour a également estimé, aux fins de la législation néo-zélandaise, qu'un accord concernant la garde pouvait revêtir une forme informelle, orale. Des preuves suffisantes devaient simplement être fournies pour établir la nature des arrangements conclus, et montrer que le droit de garde était exercé au moment du déplacement. En outre, la Cour a considéré qu'un accord pouvait entrer « en vigueur » au sens de l'article 3 sans devoir être exécutoire.

Commentaire INCADAT

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.

Exercice effectif de la garde

Les juridictions d'une quantité d'États parties ont également privilégié une interprétation large de la notion d'exercice effectif de la garde. Voir :

Australie
Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 68] ;

Autriche
8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof, 30/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548] ;

Belgique
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/BE 545] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [1996] 1 FCR 46, [1995] Fam Law 351 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 37] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. Cour d'Appel d'Aix en Provence (6e Ch.) 23 Mars 1989, 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529 note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704] ;

CA Aix en Provence 8/10/2002, L. v. Ministère Public, Mme B et Mesdemoiselles L (N° de rôle 02/14917) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 509] ;

Allemagne
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 822] ;

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 491] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
The Chief Executive of the Department for Courts for R. v. P., 20 September 1999, Court of Appeal of New Zealand [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 304] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
O. v. O. 2002 SC 430 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 507].

Dans cette décision, la « Court of Session », Cour suprême écossaise, estima que ce serait peut-être aller trop loin que de suggérer, comme les juges américains dans l'affaire Friedrich v. Friedrich, que seuls des actes d'abandon clairs et dénués d'ambiguïté pouvaient être interprétés comme impliquant que le droit de garde n'était pas exercé effectivement. Toutefois, « Friedrich » fut approuvée dans une affaire écossaise subséquente:

S. v. S., 2003 SLT 344 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 577].

Cette interprétation fut confirmée par la cour d'appel d'Écosse :

A.J. v. F.J. 2005 CSIH 36 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Suisse
K. v. K., 13 février 1992, Tribunal cantonal de Horgen [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/SZ 299] ;

449/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433];

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Friedrich v. Friedrich 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 82] ;

Sealed Appellant v. Sealed Appellee, 15 December 2004, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 779] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029].

Sur cette question, voir : P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, Oxford, 1999 p. 84 et seq.

Décision ou attestation selon l'article 15

Rôle et interprétation de l’article 15

L’article 15 constitue un mécanisme innovant qui traduit la coopération, élément central au fonctionnement de la Convention Enlèvement d’enfants de 1980. Cet article prévoit la possibilité pour les autorités d’un État contractant, avant de déposer une demande de retour, d’exiger que le demandeur obtienne, le cas échéant, de la part des autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant, une décision ou autre attestation constatant le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non‑retour de l’enfant au sens de l’article 3 de la Convention. Les Autorités centrales des États contractants doivent, dans la mesure du possible, aider les demandeurs à obtenir cette décision ou attestation.

Portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 aux fins d’obtention de décisions ou d’attestations

Les États de tradition de common law sont divisés quant au rôle du mécanisme de l’article 15. Ils s’interrogent en particulier quant à la nature de la décision ; le tribunal de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant doit-il statuer sur le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ou se contenter d’établir si le demandeur est bel et bien titulaire du droit de garde en vertu du droit interne ? Cette distinction est indissociable de l’interprétation autonome du droit de garde et du caractère « illicite » aux fins de la Convention, autrement dit estime-t-on que le droit de garde a été violé.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

La Cour d’appel s’est prononcée en faveur d’une position très stricte quant à la portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 :

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour a conclu qu’il était difficile d’envisager des circonstances dans lesquelles une demande aux fins de l’article 15 peut avoir une quelconque utilité, si la demande d’attestation dans l’État requis a trait à un point d’interprétation autonome de la Convention (par ex., le caractère illicite).

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 866].

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Si l’utilité et le caractère contraignant d’une décision d’un tribunal étranger portant sur l’étendue des droits du demandeur ont fait l’unanimité, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a insisté sur le fait que le tribunal étranger était bien mieux placé qu’un tribunal anglais pour comprendre les véritables signification et effet de ses propres lois aux termes de la Convention.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

Se ralliant à la décision de la Cour d’appel anglaise dans l’affaire Hunter v. Morrow, la Cour d’appel néo-zélandaise a conclu, à la majorité, qu’un tribunal saisit d’une demande de décision ou d’attestation aux fins de l’article 15 devrait se contenter de consigner les questions relevant du droit national et ne pas s’aventurer à classer le déplacement comme illicite ou non. Ce dernier point relève exclusivement de la compétence des tribunaux de l’État de refuge, compte tenu de l’interprétation autonome de la Convention.

Statut d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le statut qu’il convient d’accorder à une décision ou attestation de l’article 15 s’est également révélé source de controverse, en particulier eu égard à la nature ou non probante d’une décision étrangère eu égard à l’existence ou non du droit de garde et quant au caractère illicite.

Australie

In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

La Cour a estimé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était qu’indicative et qu’il appartenait aux tribunaux français de déterminer si le déplacement était illicite.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour d’appel a jugé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était pas probante et a réfuté les conclusions de la Haute Cour néo-zélandaise quant au caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour : M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1021]. Ce faisant, elle a indiqué que les tribunaux néo-zélandais ne reconnaissaient pas la distinction entre les droits de garde et d’accès, distinction admise au Royaume-Uni.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 866].

La Cour d’appel a refusé les conclusions des tribunaux roumains indiquant que le père ne disposait pas du droit de garde en vertu de la Convention.

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

La Chambre des Lords a conclu à l’unanimité qu’en cas de demande de décision ou d’attestation en vertu de l’article 15, la décision du tribunal étranger quant à l’étendue du droit du demandeur doit être, sauf circonstances exceptionnelles (par ex. si la décision résulte d’une fraude ou viole les principes élémentaires de justice), considérée comme probante. Il n’existait en l’espèce aucune circonstance exceptionnelle, le tribunal de première instance et la Cour d’appel ont dont commis une erreur en ne tenant pas compte de la décision de la Cour d’appel de Bucarest et en autorisant la production de nouvelles preuves.

Pour ce qui est de la détermination des droits du parent, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a estimé que le tribunal de l’État requis pouvait refuser de s’y conformer, uniquement lorsque cette détermination est clairement contraire à l’interprétation internationale de la Convention, comme cela a pu être le cas dans l’affaire Hunter v. Murrow. Pour sa part, Lord Brown a jugé que la détermination des droits et du caractère illicite devait, en toutes circonstances, être jugée probante.

Suisse

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953].

La Cour suprême suisse a jugé qu’une conclusion quant au droit de garde serait, en principe, contraignante pour les autorités de l’État requis. Pour ce qui est des décisions ou attestations de l’article 15, la Cour a indiqué que les avis parmi les commentateurs étaient partagés quant à leurs effets et a refusé de se prononcer sur la question.

Conséquences pratiques d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le recours au mécanisme de l’article 15 provoquera inéluctablement des retards dans le cadre de la demande de retour, en particulier lorsque la décision ou attestation d’origine fait l’objet d’un appel interjeté par les autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle. Voir par exemple :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Cette réalité pratique a à son tour généré une grande quantité d’opinions de juges.

L’affaire Re D. a suscité de nombreuses opinions. Lord Carswell a affirmé qu’il conviendrait de limiter au minimum le recours à cette procédure. Lord Brown a indiqué qu’un tel mécanisme ne serait utilisé qu’à de rares occasions. Lord Hope a conseillé d’éviter de rechercher la perfection dans l’examen du caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ; il conviendrait selon lui d’établir un juste milieu entre le fait d’agir sur base d’informations trop faibles et d’en solliciter trop. La Baronne Hale a indiqué qu’en cas d’adhésion récente d’un État à la Convention, l’article 15 pouvait, en cas de doute, s’avérer utile aux fins d’obtention d’une décision contraignante sur le contenu et les effets du droit local.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

La Cour d’appel a, à la majorité, estimé que les demandes au titre de l’article 15 ne devraient être utilisées que très rarement entre l’Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande, compte tenu de la similarité de ces deux ordres juridiques.

Solutions alternatives à une demande aux fins de l’article 15

Dans les cas où les tribunaux souhaitent simplement établir quel est le droit étranger à la lumière des informations disponibles, le recours à un expert en la matière peut apparaître comme une solution de rechange. L’expérience en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles a montré que cette méthode est loin d’être infaillible et qu’elle ne permet pas toujours de gagner du temps, voir :

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1020].

Dans ce dernier cas, le juge Thorpe a émis l’avis que l’on pourrait plus souvent recourir au Réseau judiciaire européen, par l’intermédiaire du Bureau international du droit de la famille au sein de la Royal Courts of Justice. Des conseils pratiques pourraient ainsi être émis quant à la meilleure marche à suivre dans un cas particulier : recourir conjointement à un unique expert ; solliciter une décision ou attestation en vertu de l’article 15 ; solliciter l’opinion d’un juge de liaison concernant le droit de son État, opinion qui ne serait pas contraignante mais qui pourrait aider les parties et le tribunal à distinguer le poids des arguments ou des intentions dans la contestation de la faculté du plaignant à remplir les conditions établies à l’article 3.