CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/USf 1029

Court

Country

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Name

United States Supreme Court

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Roberts, C. J., Stevens, Scalia, Kennedy, Thomas, Ginsburg, Breyer, Alito, and Sotomayor, JJ

States involved

Requesting State

CHILE

Requested State

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Decision

Date

17 May 2010

Status

Final

Grounds

Aims of the Convention - Preamble, Arts 1 and 2 | Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Interpretation of the Convention

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

3

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Villegas Duran v. Arribada Beaumont, 534 F.3d 142, (2d Cir. 2008); Abbott v. Abbott, 495 F. Supp. 2d 635, (W.D. Tex. 2007); Abbott v. Abbott 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008); Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, (4th Cir. 2003); Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942, (9th Cir. 2002); Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133, (2d Cir. 2000); Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702, (11th Cir. 2004); Vale v. Avila, 538 F.3d 581, (7th Cir. 2008); Whallon v. Lynn, 230 F.3d 450, (1st Cir. 2000); Viragh v. Foldes, 415 Mass. 96, 612 N. E. 2d 241, (1993); C. v. C., [1989] 1 W. L. R. 654, (C. A.); In re D (A Child), [2007] 1 A. C. 619; CA 5271/92 Foxman v. Foxman; In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33; Sonderup v Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC); A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428; 2 BvR 1126/97; Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290; D. S. v. V. W., [1996] 2 S. C. R. 108, 134 D. L. R. (4th) 481; Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette; Attorney for the Republic at Périgueux v. Mrs. S., [T. G. I.] Périgueux, Mar. 17, 1992, Rev. cr. dr. internat. Privé 82(4) Oct.–Dec. 1993, 650, 651–653, note Bertrand Ancel, D. 1992, note G. C.
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The application related to a child born in Hawaii in 1995 to a British father and American mother. The parents were married and in early 2002 the family moved to Chile. In March 2003 the parents separated and this led to a protracted period of litigation over the care of their child. Four orders were issued by the Chilean courts each of which recognised the mother as being the primary carer and vesting the father with access rights.

An order of January 2004, which had been sought by the mother, prohibited the unilateral removal of the child from Chile by either parent. In August 2005 the mother unilaterally removed the child to the United States. Once he discovered their location the father issued return proceedings. In February 2007 the US District Court for the Western District of Texas dismissed his application: Abbott v. Abbott, 495 F. Supp. 2d 635, (W.D. Tex. 2007).

On 16 September 2008 the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit dismissed the father's appeal finding that his right to veto the removal of his child from Chile, under court order and Chilean statute did not afford him a custodial right and thereby a remedy for the purposes of the Convention: Abbott v. Abbott 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008).

On 29 June 2009 a petition for a writ of certiorari was granted by the US Supreme Court in the light of the division in federal appellate authority on the interpretation of rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

Ruling

Appeal allowed and case remitted to the trial court; the removal was wrongful but a determination had to be made as to whether any of the exceptions were applicable.

Grounds

Aims of the Convention - Preamble, Arts 1 and 2

The Court held that interpreting a breach of ne exeat rights as giving rise to the Convention's return remedy accorded with the instrument's objects and purposes, including its deterrent effect. The Court stressed the importance of judicial neutrality, noting that judges must strive to avoid the common tendency to prefer their own society and culture.

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

Kennedy, J., with whom Roberts, C.J., Scalia, Ginsburg, Alito, and Sotomayor, JJ. concurred, gave the opinion of the Cour. The Court held that reference must be made to Chilean law to determine the content of the father's right, but the decision as to whether the latter amounted to a right of custody had to be made in the light of the Convention's text and structure.

Under Chilean law the father had a joint right to decide his child's country of residence. The Court accepted evidence that this meant neither parent could "unilaterally" establish the child's place of residence. The Court held that the father's ne exeat right gave him both the joint "right to determine the child's place of residence" and joint "rights relating to the care of the person of the child."

The phrase "place of residence" was held to encompasses the child's country of residence, especially in light of the Convention's explicit purpose to prevent wrongful removals across international borders. However, even if the term referred only to the child's street address within a country, a ne exeat right would still entitles the father to "determine" that place. It followed that the Convention's protection of a parent's custodial "right to determine the child's place of residence" included a ne exeat right.

The Court further held that the father's joint right to determine the child's country of residence also gave him "rights relating to the care of the person of the child."  In this it held that a child's language and identity, as well as the culture and traditions to which he will be exposed, are inextricably linked to his country of residence.

The Court ruled it was irrelevant that a ne exeat right did not fit within traditional notions of physical custody. It was Convention understanding of the term which mattered and following this definition would promote international consistency in interpreting the Convention.

Moreover, the Court of Appeals' interpretation that a breach of a ne exeat right did not give rise to a return remedy would render the Convention meaningless. Ne exeat rights could be contrasted with access rights as the former could only be honoured with a return remedy since they depended on the child's location being the country of habitual residence.

The Court rejected the argument that a ne exeat order was simply a mechanism to protect the jurisdiction of the court originally seised of the case.  It specified that even a ne exeat order issued to protect a court's jurisdiction pending further decrees was consistent with allowing a parent to object to the child's removal from the country.

The Court did hold that it need not decide the status of ne exeat orders lacking parental consent provisions. But in the instant case, the father's rights derived from Chilean statute which clearly required his consent before the child could be taken out of the jurisdiction.

Dissent
Stevens, J., filed a dissenting opinion, in which he was joined by Thomas and Breyer, JJ. The dissent rejected the Court's interpretation of the Convention, and of the intention of the drafters, as well as its assessment of the balance of international case law.

It noted that just because rights of custody could be shared by two parents, it did not follow that the drafters intended a limited veto power to be a right of custody. A reading as broad and flexible as the Court's was deemed to obliterate the careful distinction the drafters had drawn between rights of custody and rights of access.

Actual Exercise
The Court held that a ne exeat right was by nature inchoate and so had no operative force except when the other parent sought to remove the child from the country. Where that occurred the left behind parent could exercise the right by declining to consent to the relocation or through placing conditions. Where consent was not sought it was a situation where the right would have been "exercised but for the removal or retention."

Interpretation of the Convention


The Court referred to a broad spectrum of international case law and noted that it confirmed a broad acceptance of the rule that ne exeat rights were rights of custody. Similarly scholars agreed with the emerging international consensus that ne exeat rights were rights of custody, even if that view was not generally formulated when the Convention was drafted. The Court equally sought to derive support from the Perez-Vera Explanatory Report.

INCADAT comment

This decision reversed that of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in Abbott v. Abbott 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 989].

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Faits

La demande concernait un enfant né à Hawaï en 1995 d'un père britannique et d'une mère états-unienne. Les parents étaient mariés et début 2002 la famille déménagea au Chili. En mars 2003, les parents se séparèrent et s'en suivit un long contentieux relatif à la garde de l'enfant. Quatre ordonnances furent délivrées par les tribunaux chiliens, chacune d'entre elles accordant la garde physique à la mère et reconnaissant au père un droit de visite.

Une ordonnance de janvier 2004, délivrée à l'initiative de la mère, interdit le déplacement unilatéral de l'enfant du Chili par l'un ou l'autre parent. En août 2005, la mère emmena unilatéralement l'enfant du Chili vers les États-Unis. Après les avoir localisés, le père engagea une procédure de retour. En février 2007, le tribunal de district (District Court) des États-Unis pour le district ouest du Texas rejeta sa demande : Abbott v. Abbott, 495 F. Supp. 2d 635, (W.D. Tex. 2007).

Le 16 septembre 2008, la Cour d'appel des États-Unis pour le cinquième circuit rejeta l'appel du père au motif que son droit de s'opposer au déplacement de l'enfant hors du Chili ne lui conférait, ni au regard de l'ordonnance du tribunal, ni au regard de la loi chilienne, de droit de garde et qu'il ne disposait par conséquent d'aucun recours dans le cadre de la Convention : Abbott v. Abbott 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008).

Le 29 juin 2009, la Cour suprême des États-Unis accueillit le recours (writ of certiorari) en raison des divergences d'interprétation du droit de garde dans le cadre de la Convention dans les décisions d'appel fédérales. 

Dispositif

Appel accueilli et affaire renvoyée devant le tribunal de première instance ; le déplacement était illicite mais il fallait déterminer s'il correspondait à l'une des exceptions.

Motifs

Objectifs de la Convention - Préambule, art. 1 et 2

La Cour a décidé qu'interpréter la violation d'un droit de véto relatif au déplacement comme donnant droit de déposer une demande de retour dans le cadre de la Convention était conforme avec l'objet et les buts de l'instrument, notamment son effet dissuasif. La Cour a souligné l'importance de la neutralité judiciaire, soulignant que les juges devaient s'efforcer de ne pas suivre la tendance commune à préférer leur propre société et culture.

Droit de garde - art. 3

Le juge Kennedy, rejoint par le président Roberts ainsi que les juges Scalia, Ginsburg, Alito et Sotomayor, a présenté l'opinion de la Cour. La Cour a disposé que le contenu du droit du père devait être déterminé en fonction du droit chilien mais que la décision relative à l'équivalence de ce droit avec un droit de garde devait être prise à la lumière du texte et de la structure de la Convention.

En vertu du droit chilien, le père disposait du droit de décider du pays de résidence de son enfant. La Cour a admis les éléments de preuve indiquant qu'aucun des parents ne pouvait décider « unilatéralement » du lieu de résidence de l'enfant. La Cour a déterminé que le droit de véto du père relatif au déplacement (ne exeat) lui conférait à la fois le droit partagé « de décider [du] lieu de résidence [de l'enfant] » et le droit partagé « portant sur les soins de la personne de l'enfant ».

L'expression « lieu de résidence » a été considérée comme recouvrant le pays de résidence de l'enfant, en particulier à la lumière du but explicite de la Convention d'empêcher les déplacements illicites à travers les frontières internationales. Toutefois, même si les termes faisaient seulement référence à l'adresse postale dans un pays, un droit de véto relatif au déplacement permettrait encore au père de « décider » de ce lieu. Il en découle que la protection par la Convention du droit de garde d'un parent de « décider [du] lieu de résidence » de l'enfant comprend le droit de véto relatif au déplacement.

La Cour a ensuite précisé que le droit partagé du père de décider du pays de résidence de l'enfant lui conférait également un «  droit portant sur les soins de la personne de l'enfant ». Elle a à ce sujet estimé que la langue et l'identité d'un enfant, ainsi que la culture et les traditions auxquelles il est exposé sont inextricablement liées à son pays de résidence.

La Cour a estimé comme non pertinent le fait qu'un droit de véto relatif au déplacement ne corresponde pas aux notions traditionnelles de la garde physique. C'est la compréhension de ce terme au sens de la Convention qui comptait et suivre cette définition contribuerait à promouvoir une cohérence internationale dans l'interprétation de la Convention. En outre, l'interprétation de la Cour d'appel selon laquelle une violation d'un droit de véto relatif au déplacement ne donnerait pas lieu à une demande de retour reviendrait à vider la Convention de son sens.

Un droit de véto relatif au déplacement doit être distingué d'un droit de visite car le premier ne peut être honoré que par une demande de retour puisqu'il dépend du fait que l'enfant se trouve dans le pays de résidence habituelle. La Cour a rejeté l'argument selon lequel une ordonnance de non déplacement (ne exeat) serait simplement un mécanisme destiné à protéger la compétence de la juridiction saisie de l'affaire en premier lieu.

Elle a précisé que même une ordonnance de non déplacement délivrée pour protéger la compétence d'une juridiction en attendant que des décisions soient rendues était compatible avec l'octroi à un parent de la possibilité de s'opposer au déplacement de l'enfant hors du pays.

La Cour a estimé qu'il ne lui était pas nécessaire de se prononcer sur le statut d'ordonnances de non déplacement auxquelles faisaient défaut les dispositions relatives au consentement parental. Mais dans le cas d'espèce, les droits conférés au père par la loi chilienne nécessitaient clairement son consentement préalable pour que l'enfant puisse être emmené hors du pays.

Opinion dissidente
Le juge Stevens a déposé une opinion dissidente à laquelle se sont joints les juges Thomas et Breyer. L'opinion dissidente a rejeté l'interprétation par la Cour de la Convention et de l'intention de ses auteurs, ainsi que son analyse de l'équilibre de la jurisprudence internationale.

Elle a remarqué que si le droit de garde pouvait être partagé par deux parents, il n'en découlait pas pour autant que les auteurs aient souhaité qu'un droit de véto limité soit considéré comme un droit de garde. Elle a estimé que la lecture large et flexible de la Cour détruisait la distinction soigneuse faite par les auteurs entre droit de garde et droit de visite.

Exercice effectif
La Cour a estimé qu'un droit de véto relatif au déplacement est par nature incomplet et n'a par conséquent aucune force opératoire sauf lorsque l'autre parent cherche à déplacer l'enfant hors du pays. Quand cela se produit, le parent dépossédé peut exercer ce droit en refusant de consentir au déplacement ou en y posant des conditions. Lorsque le consentement n'a pas été cherché, on se trouve dans une situation dans laquelle le droit  « eût été [exercé] si [le déplacement ou le non-retour] n'étaient survenus ».

Interprétation de la Convention

Se référant à un large éventail de décisions internationales, la Cour a noté que cette jurisprudence confirmait une acceptation large de la règle selon laquelle un droit de véto relatif au déplacement est un droit de garde.

De même, les universitaires et experts se joignaient eux aussi au consensus international émergeant en convenant qu'un droit de véto relatif au déplacement est un droit de garde, même si cette opinion n'avait pas été formulée de manière générale au moment de la rédaction de la Convention. La Cour s'est également appuyée sur le rapport explicatif Perez-Vera.

Commentaire INCADAT

Cette décision a renversé la jurisprudence Abbott v. Abbott 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989] de la Cour d'appel des États-Unis pour le cinquième circuit.

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.

Hechos

La solicitud se refiere a un niño nacido en Hawai en el año 1995 de padre inglés y madre norteamericana. Los padres, que estaban casados, se mudaron a Chile con el niño en el año 2002. La pareja se separó en marzo de 2003, hecho que dio lugar a un largo período de litigios acerca del cuidado del niño.

La justicia chilena dictó cuatro órdenes, cada una de las cuales reconoció a la madre como la principal cuidadora del niño, otorgando al padre derechos de visita. Una orden de enero de 2004, que había sido solicitada por la madre, prohibió la salida del niño de Chile sin el consentimiento de ambos progenitors.

En agosto de 2005, la madre llevó unilateralmente al niño a Estados Unidos. Una vez que el padre descubrió donde se encontraba el niño, inició el pedido de restitución. En febrero de 2007, el Tribunal de Distrito de Estados Unidos para el Distrito Oeste de Texas desestimó el pedido: Abbott v. Abbott, 495 F. Supp. 2d 635, (W.D. Tex. 2007).

El 16 de septiembre de 2008, la Corte de Apelaciones del Quinto Circuito de los Estados Unidos desestimó la apelación del padre, considerando que su derecho a oponerse a la salida del niño de Chile, que había sido otorgado por un tribunal chileno de conformidad con la legislación interna de ese país, no le otorgaba derechos de custodia, y por ende no podía obtener una solución a través del Convenio: Abbott v. Abbott 542 F.3d 1081 (5° Cir. 2008).

El 29 de junio de 2009 la Corte Suprema de Estados unidos dictó un auto de avocación (writ of certiorari) en atención al desacuerdo existente en la autoridad federal de apelación con respecto a la interpretación de los derechos de custodia a los efectos del Convenio.

Fallo

Se concedió la apelación y se remitió el caso al tribunal de primera instancia, ya que si bien el traslado fue ilícito, aún debía determinarse si alguna de las excepciones era aplicable.

Fundamentos

Finalidad del Convenio - Preámbulo, arts. 1 y 2


La Corte interpretó que una violación del derecho ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) como fundamento de una solicitud de restitución a través del Convenio se corresponde con los objetivos y propósitos del mismo, incluyendo sus efectos disuasorios. La Corte destacó la importancia de la neutralidad judicial, poniendo de manifiesto que los jueces deben luchar por evitar la tendencia común a preferir su propia sociedad y cultura.

Derechos de custodia - art. 3


Kennedy, J., con quien concordaron Roberts, C.J., Scalia, Ginsburg, Alito, y Sotomayor, JJ., expuso la opinión de la Corte. La Corte sostuvo que era necesario referirse a la legislación chilena para determinar el contenido de los derechos del padre. Sin embargo, la decisión acerca de si esos derechos implican un derecho de custodia debe ser realizada a la luz del texto y la estructura del Convenio.

Según la legislación chilena, el padre tenía el derecho de decidir el lugar de residencia de su hijo conjuntamente con la madre. La Corte dio por probado que ello implica que ninguna de las partes podía establecer el lugar de residencia del niño "unilateralmente". La Corte sostuvo que el derecho ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) a favor del padre le otorgó a éste tanto el "derecho a determinar el lugar de residencia del niño" como "derechos conjuntos relativos al cuidado de la persona del niño".

La frase "lugar de residencia" se consideró que comprendía el país de residencia del niño, especialmente a la luz del claro propósito del Convenio de prevenir traslados ilícitos a través de las fronteras. Sin embargo, aún cuando el término se refiriera solo al domicilio del niño dentro de un país, el derecho ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) igual implicaría el derecho del padre a "determinar" ese lugar. De lo que se concluyó que la protección que el Convenio da al derecho de custodia del progenitor para determinar el lugar de residencia de su hijo, incluye el derecho ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país).

La Corte también decidió que el derecho de custodia conjunto del padre de determinar el país de residencia del niño también le otorgó "derechos relativos al cuidado de la persona del niño". En tal sentido, sostuvo que el idioma y la identidad del niño, así como la cultura y las tradiciones a las que será expuesto, están inexorablemente ligados a su país de residencia.

La Corte consideró que era irrelevante que el derecho ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) no se correspondiera con la noción tradicional de custodia física del niño. Lo que importa es seguir la noción que de ese derecho da el Convenio, para así fomentar una interpretación consistente del mismo a nivel internacional. En tal sentido, la Corte señaló que la interpretación de la Corte de Apelaciones que estableció que una violación del derecho ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) no da lugar a la posibilidad de solicitar la restitución a través del Convenio, convertiría al Convenio en un sinsentido.

El derecho de ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) se diferencia  del derecho de visitas, dado que el primero solo podría ser satisfecho con la restitución del niño, ya que su ejercicio depende de que el niño se encuentre en el país de su residencia habitual.

La Corte rechazó el argumento de que la orden que otorga el derecho ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) es simplemente un mecanismo para proteger la jurisdicción del tribunal que entendió originalmente en el caso. Asimismo, especificó que aún el derecho ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) solicitado para proteger la jurisdicción de un tribunal cuando aún hay resoluciones pendientes es consistente con la idea de permitir que un progenitor objete el traslado de su hijo fuera del país de su residencia habitual.

La Corte no consideró necesario decidir el estatus de las órdenes que otorgan derechos ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) cuando no existan disposiciones relativas al consentimiento parental. Pero en el caso dado, los derechos del padre se derivaban de la ley chilena que, claramente, requiere el consentimiento del progenitor para trasladar al niño fuera de la jurisdicción.

Disidencia
Stevens, J., dió una opinión diferente, en la cual fue seguido por el Juez Thomas and Breyer, JJ.  La disidencia rechazó la interpretación que la Corte hizo del Convenio y de la intención de quienes redactaron el Convenio, así como de sus aseveraciones relativas a la consistencia de la jurisprudencia internacional.

Asimismo, se destacó que aun cuando los derechos de custodia puedan ser compartidos por ambos progenitores, de ello no se sigue que los redactores hayan tenido la intención de que el derecho de veto limitado constituyera un derecho de custodia. Consideraron que una lectura tan amplia y flexible como la de la Corte desdibuja la cuidadosa distinción que los redactores habían establecido entre derechos de custodia y derechos de visita.

Ejercicio efectivo
La Corte sostuvo que el derecho ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) era por naturaleza incipiente, y es por ello que no tuvo fuerza operativa, hasta el momento en que el otro progenitor buscó trasladar al niño fuera del país. Cuando ello ocurrió, el progenitor desplazado podía ejercer su derecho, negando el consentimiento para la reubicación o estableciendo condiciones. Como el consentimiento no le fue requerido, esta fue una situación en la que el derecho se habría ejercido "de no ser por el traslado o retención".

Interpretación del Convenio


La Corte hizo referencia a un amplio espectro de jurisprudencia internacional y destacó que confirmó una amplia aceptación de la regla de que los derechos ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) son derechos de custodia.

Del mismo modo, académicos estuvieron de acuerdo con el consenso emergente a nivel internacional que reconoce que los derechos ne exeat (de prohibición de salida del país) son derechos de custodia, aun cuando ese punto de vista no haya sido formulado de ese modo al redactarse el Convenio. Por su parte, la Corte buscó apoyo en el informe explicativo Pérez-Vera.

Comentario INCADAT

Esta decisión revocó la de la Corte de Apelaciones de Estados Unidos del Quinto Circuito en Abbott v. Abbott 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 989].

¿Qué se entiende por derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio?

Los tribunales de una abrumadora mayoría de Estados contratantes han aceptado que el derecho a oponerse a la salida del menor de la jurisdicción equivale a un derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio. Véanse:

Australia
En el caso Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, Oberster Gerichtshof, 05/02/1992 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AT 375];

Canadá
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 11];

La Corte Suprema estableció una distinción entre una cláusula de no traslado en una orden de custodia provisoria y en una orden definitiva. Sugirió que si una cláusula de no traslado incluida en una orden de custodia definitiva se considerara equivalente a un derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio, ello tendría serias implicancias para los derechos de movilidad de la persona que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 334];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880];

Francia
Ministère Public c. M.B., 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 62];

Alemania
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Tribunal Constitucional Federal), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 803];

Sudáfrica
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 309];

Suiza
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 427].

Estados Unidos de América
[Traducción en curso - Por favor remítase a la versión inglesa]

Right to Object to a Removal
[Traducción en curso - Por favor remítase a la versión inglesa]

Para comentarios académicos véanse:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 ss;

M. Bailey, The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention, Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287.

C. Whitman, Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.