CASE

No full text available

Case Name

L.J.G. v. R.T.P. [2006] NZFLR 589

INCADAT reference

HC/E/NZ 1123

Court

Country

NEW ZEALAND

Name

Family Court, Alexandra

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
O'Dwyer J.

States involved

Requesting State

AUSTRALIA

Requested State

NEW ZEALAND

Decision

Date

23 December 2005

Status

Final

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3 | Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a) | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

Order

Return ordered with undertakings offered

HC article(s) Considered

12 13(1)(a) 13(1)(b) 13(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(a) 13(1)(b) 13(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
A. (A Minor) (Abduction), Re [1988] 1 FLR 365; A. and another (minors) (abduction: acquiescence), Re [1992] 1 All ER 929; A. v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] NZLR 517; B. v. C. [2002] NZFLR 433; Collins v. Lowndes (High Court, Auckland AP 115 SW026/3/03, Harrison J); Damiano v. Damiano [1993] NZFLR 548; De Lewinski v. D.G. Department Community Services (1993) 1337 FLR 91; Dickson v. Dickson [1990] SCLR 692; Gsponer v. Johnston [1988] 12 FAM LR 753; H. and others (minors) (abduction: acquiescence), Re [1997] 2 All ER 225; H. v. H. (1995) 13 FRNZ 498; J. (A minor) (abduction: Custody Rights), Re [1990] 2 AC 562; K.M.H. v. Chief Executive of Department for Courts [2001] NZFLR 825; Punter v. Secretary of Justice [2004] 2 NZLR 28; R. v. Barnet London Borough Council ex parte Shah [1983] 2 AC 309; R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence), Re [1995] 1 FLR 716; Ryding v. Turvey [1998] NZFLR 313; S. (A minor) (abduction), Re [1993] 2 WLR 775; S.K. v. K.P. [2005] NZFLR 1064; S. v. S. [1999] 3 NZLR 513; T. (abduction: child's objection to return), Re [2000] FLR 192; V.P. v. A. (Child abduction) [2005] NZFLR 817.
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Habitual Residence
Habitual Residence
Open-Ended Moves

Exceptions to Return

Acquiescence
Acquiescence
Grave Risk of Harm
Australian and New Zealand Case Law
Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application concerned two children born in Australia on 22 January 1994 and 5 February 1995 to an Australian mother and a New Zealand father. The parents' relationship began in Australia in 1992 and was characterised by periods of estrangement when the father returned to New Zealand.

From November 1996 the family lived together in New Zealand where the parents married in April 2000. In 2001 or 2002 the family returned to Australia where they lived continuously until 2005. Following marital difficulties, the mother moved out of the matrimonial home in Brisbane in March 2005.

The children remained in the care of the father. On 29 April, he sent them to New Zealand on one-way tickets to stay with relatives. The mother commenced proceedings for the return of the children to Australia in October 2005.

Ruling

Removal wrongful and return ordered; the objection of one child to return was not sufficiently strong to override the policy of the Convention.

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3

The father claimed that the children's habitual residence remained in New Zealand throughout their time in Australia. The move was intended to be for a limited period and a return to New Zealand was contemplated. The Court held that this did not prevent the children from acquiring a new habitual residence.

The Court referred to the judgment of Glazebrook J in S.K. v. K.P. [2005] NZFLR 1064 where he stated that the settled purpose need not be to reside in a place forever as long as there is intended to be a sufficient degree of continuity (para [77]). The Court was further influenced by his comment that four years was such a long time that it would be unrealistic to argue that there was no intention to change habitual residence (para [78]).

Furthermore, the father claimed that the son regarded New Zealand as his "home country". The Court said there was a risk that the child may not be distinguishing his present preference to live in New Zealand from what he felt when he was 7 or 8 when he moved to Australia. Even if at that time the son had had a settled purpose as to residence which differed from his parents, he was too young to put it into effect.

His settled purpose was therefore the same as his parents who determined where he lived. The Court stated that the views and perceptions of the son should be taken into account in determining all the factual aspects of habitual residence.

The Court concluded that his objections to Australia were not particularly strong: he spoke positively about life there and had strong connections with the country including school friends and his mother's family. Thus, the Court held that immediately prior to their removal to New Zealand, the children were habitually resident in Australia.

Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a)


When the mother realised that the children were not at school sports as expected on 29 April, she went to their home to ask the father where they were. On learning of their departure for New Zealand, she applied on the same day to the Australian passport authority not to issue passports for either of the children without her consent and instructed a solicitor to apply for residence orders. She obtained an order that the children be returned to Australia forthwith and regularly contacted them and the father's family in New Zealand by telephone.

The Court concluded that these actions all pointed to the unequivocal efforts of the mother to secure the return of the children and were wholly inconsistent with acquiescence. There was no evidence of clear unequivocal words of agreement to the children living in New Zealand permanently.  At best, the mother had been ambivalent about the children having a holiday there.  The father was evasive as to the children's departure and took steps to mislead the mother as to his intentions at the time of their removal and thereafter.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)


The father alleged that the mother abused alcohol and had an erratic and irresponsible lifestyle, something which she vehemently denied. He claimed that returning the children to her care would expose them to a grave risk of harm or place them in an intolerable situation.

The Court stated that to establish the defence under Article 13(1)(b), the father had to prove that the grave risk of harm was caused, not by returning the children to the care of their mother, but by returning them to Australia due to the inability of the courts to provide protection (Re A. (A Minor) Abduction [1988] 1 FLR 365). Furthermore, there was a presumption that the courts of Convention countries would protect children on their return.

The father alleged that the courts of Australia could not be relied upon to protect the children's welfare as there was no certainty that their views would be represented.  The Court rejected this argument. The Australian courts used various mechanisms to ascertain the views of children and there was no reason to think that they would not be employed in this case.

In rejecting the father's submission, the Court held that returning the children to the mother's care did not inevitably expose them to a grave risk of harm. The threshold for establishing the grave risk defence had clearly not been met in this case. The mother had undertaken not to enforce the order for day-to-day care until the end of January 2006 and only on notice to the respondent. This removed any potential risk and maintained the status quo as to the care of the children until the issue could be determined by the Australian court.

Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

The Court found that both children were of an age and maturity at which it was appropriate to take account of their views. The daughter did not object to returning to Australia. She expressed a preference for living with her mother and had not been too happy at the prospect of living permanently in New Zealand. She had been happier at school in Australia and wanted to see her mother, family and friends.

The son did object to returning to Australia but his objections were not strong. He preferred living in New Zealand than Australia and, unlike his sister, was happy to live there permanently. He would prefer to live with his father but was happy to go to Australia for a holiday to see his mother.

The Court found that he still had strong connections with Australia and was adaptable. His concern about being returned to his mother's full time care in Australia was alleviated by assurances that he would return to live with his father after a holiday with his mother. The parents did not want the children to be separated and were keen that they be treated as a single unit.

The Court found that the son's objection to returning to Australia was overridden by countervailing factors, namely the policy of the Convention that children should be promptly returned to their state of habitual residence. His objection was largely derived from his preference for living with his father and therefore was of limited weight. This was because the issue of custody related to the child's welfare which, under the Convention, was a matter best determined by the courts of the child's habitual residence.

The Court found that Australia was the most appropriate forum for determining custody. Proceedings were already pending before the Australian courts and given that the children had been living in Australia continuously for four years prior to their removal, the most relevant evidence was likely to be located there. There was nothing to indicate that returning the son to Australia would compromise his welfare. The Court ordered both children to return to Australia.

Authors of the summary: Jamie Yule & Peter McEleavy

INCADAT comment

Habitual Residence

The interpretation of the central concept of habitual residence (Preamble, Art. 3, Art. 4) has proved increasingly problematic in recent years with divergent interpretations emerging in different jurisdictions. There is a lack of uniformity as to whether in determining habitual residence the emphasis should be exclusively on the child, with regard paid to the intentions of the child's care givers, or primarily on the intentions of the care givers. At least partly as a result, habitual residence may appear a very flexible connecting factor in some Contracting States yet much more rigid and reflective of long term residence in others.

Any assessment of the interpretation of habitual residence is further complicated by the fact that cases focusing on the concept may concern very different factual situations. For example habitual residence may arise for consideration following a permanent relocation, or a more tentative move, albeit one which is open-ended or potentially open-ended, or indeed the move may be for a clearly defined period of time.

General Trends:

United States Federal Appellate case law may be taken as an example of the full range of interpretations which exist with regard to habitual residence.

Child Centred Focus

The United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit has advocated strongly for a child centred approach in the determination of habitual residence:

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 935].

See also:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 221].

Combined Child's Connection / Parental Intention Focus

The United States Courts of Appeals for the 3rd and 8th Circuits, have espoused a child centred approach but with reference equally paid to the parents' present shared intentions.

The key judgment is that of Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 83].

See also:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 879].

In the latter case a distinction was drawn between the situation of very young children, where particular weight was placed on parental intention(see for example: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 808]) and that of older children where the impact of parental intention was more limited.

Parental Intention Focus

The judgment of the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 301] has been highly influential in providing that there should ordinarily be a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence before a child can acquire a new one.

This interpretation has been endorsed and built upon in other Federal appellate decisions so that where there was not a shared intention on the part of the parents as to the purpose of the move this led to an existing habitual residence being retained, even though the child had been away from that jurisdiction for an extended period of time. See for example:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 777]: United States habitual residence retained after 8 months of an intended 4 year stay in Germany;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 780]: United States habitual residence retained during 32 month stay in Mexico;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 482]: United States habitual residence retained during 27 month stay in Greece.

The Mozes approach has also been approved of by the Federal Court of Appeals for the 2nd and 7th Circuits:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 878].

It should be noted that within the Mozes approach the 9th Circuit did acknowledge that given enough time and positive experience, a child's life could become so firmly embedded in the new country as to make it habitually resident there notwithstanding lingering parental intentions to the contrary.

Other Jurisdictions

There are variations of approach in other jurisdictions:

Austria
The Supreme Court of Austria has ruled that a period of residence of more than six months in a State will ordinarily be characterized as habitual residence, and even if it takes place against the will of the custodian of the child (since it concerns a factual determination of the centre of life).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
In the Province of Quebec, a child centred focus is adopted:

In Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 651], the Cour d'appel de Montréal held that the determination of the habitual residence of a child was a purely factual issue to be decided in the light of the circumstances of the case with regard to the reality of the child's life, rather than that of his parents. The actual period of residence must have endured for a continuous and not insignificant period of time; the child must have a real and active link to the place, but there is no minimum period of residence which is specified.

Germany
A child centred, factual approach is also evident in German case law:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 944].

This has led to the Federal Constitutional Court accepting that a habitual residence may be acquired notwithstanding the child having been wrongfully removed to the new State of residence:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 233].

The Constitutional Court upheld the finding of the Higher Regional Court that the children had acquired a habitual residence in France, notwithstanding the nature of their removal there. This was because habitual residence was a factual concept and during their nine months there, the children had become integrated into the local environment.

Israel
Alternative approaches have been adopted when determining the habitual residence of children. On occasion, strong emphasis has been placed on parental intentions. See:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 939].

However, reference has been made to a more child centred approach in other cases. See:

decision of the Supreme Court in C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 922].

New Zealand
In contrast to the Mozes approach the requirement of a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence was specifically rejected by a majority of the New Zealand Court of Appeal. See

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 816].

Switzerland
A child centred, factual approach is evident in Swiss case law:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841].

United Kingdom
The standard approach is to consider the settled intention of the child's carers in conjunction with the factual reality of the child's life.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 2]. For academic commentary on the different models of interpretation given to habitual residence. See:

R. Schuz, "Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice", Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13, No. 1, 2001, p. 1;

R. Schuz, "Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context", Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Open-Ended Moves

Where a move is open ended, or potentially open ended, the habitual residence at the time of the move may also be lost and a new one acquired relatively quickly, see:

United Kingdom - England and Wales (Non-Convention case)
Al Habtoor v. Fotheringham [2001] EWCA Civ 186, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 875];

New Zealand
Callaghan v. Thomas [2001] NZFLR 1105 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 413];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Cameron v. Cameron 1996 SC 17, 1996 SLT 306, 1996 SCLR 25 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 71];

Moran v. Moran 1997 SLT 541 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 74];

United States of America
Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 879].

Acquiescence

There has been general acceptance that where the exception of acquiescence is concerned regard must be paid in the first instance to the subjective intentions of the left behind parent, see:

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 213];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 345];

Austria
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 981].

Considering the issue for the first time, Austria's supreme court held that acquiescence in a temporary state of affairs would not suffice for the purposes of Article 13(1) a), rather there had to be acquiescence in a durable change in habitual residence.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 545];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 851];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

In this case the House of Lords affirmed that acquiescence was not to be found in passing remarks or letters written by a parent who has recently suffered the trauma of the removal of his children.

Ireland
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

Israel
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 807];

New Zealand
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 533];

United Kingdom - Scotland
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 500];

South Africa
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 499];

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841].

In keeping with this approach there has also been a reluctance to find acquiescence where the applicant parent has sought initially to secure the voluntary return of the child or a reconciliation with the abducting parent, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [INCADAT cite:  HC/E/UKe 179];

Ireland
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

United States of America
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 84];

In the Australian case Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 290] negotiation over the course of 12 months was taken to amount to acquiescence but, notably, in the court's exercise of its discretion it decided to make a return order.

Australian and New Zealand Case Law

Australia
In Australia a very strict approach was adopted initially with regard to Article 13(1) b), see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @294@];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @293@].

However, following the judgment of the High Court in the joint appeals:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @346@, @347@], where a literal interpretation of the exception was advocated, greater attention has now been focused on the risk to the child and the post return situation. 

In the context of a primary carer abducting parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence, see:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @544@].

With regard to a child facing a grave risk of psychological harm see:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 871].

For recent examples of cases where the grave risk of harm exception was rejected see:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @782@].

New Zealand
Appellate authority initially indicated that the change in emphasis adopted in Australia with regard to Article 13(1) b) would be followed in New Zealand also, see:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 495].

However, in the more recent decision: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770] the High Court of New Zealand (Auckland) has affirmed, albeit obiter, that the binding interpretation in New Zealand remained the strict interpretation given by the Court of Appeal in:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 90].

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Faits

La demande concernait deux enfants nés en Australie les 22 janvier 1994 et 5 février 1995 d'une mère australienne et d'un père néo-zélandais. Le couple s'est formé en Australie en 1992, une relation caractérisée par des périodes d'éloignement géographique lorsque le père rentrait en Nouvelle-Zélande.

À partir de novembre 1996, la famille a vécu en Nouvelle-Zélande, où les parents se sont mariés en avril 2000. En 2001 ou 2002, la famille est revenue en Australie pour y vivre en continu jusque 2005. Le couple connaissant des problèmes conjugaux, la mère a quitté le domicile conjugal de Brisbane en mars 2005.

Les enfants sont restés avec leur père. Le 29 avril, il les a envoyés en aller simple en Nouvelle-Zélande afin qu'ils rejoignent des membres de sa famille. En octobre 2005, la mère a entamé une procédure en vue du retour des enfants en Australie.

Dispositif

Déplacement illicite et retour ordonné ; l'opposition de l'un des enfants n'était pas suffisamment ferme pour l'emporter sur les objectifs de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants.

Motifs

Résidence habituelle - art. 3


Le père a affirmé que la résidence habituelle des enfants était toujours située en Nouvelle-Zélande, même lors de leur séjour en Australie. La durée du déplacement était censée être limitée et un retour en Nouvelle-Zélande était envisagé.

La Cour a estimé que cela n'empêchait pas les enfants d'acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, se fondant sur la décision du juge Glazebrook J. dans l'affaire S.K. c. K.P. [2005] NZFLR 1064 ; celui-ci avait déclaré qu'un lieu de vie stable n'était pas nécessairement un lieu où l'on vit en permanence, du moment qu'il existe un degré de continuité suffisant (para [77]). Elle a également tenu compte de son commentaire : quatre années constituent une période si longue qu'il serait surréaliste de soutenir qu'aucun changement de résidence habituelle n'était prévu (para [78]).

En outre, le père soutenait que son fils considérait la Nouvelle-Zélande comme son « pays d'origine ». La Cour a indiqué qu'il était possible que l'enfant ne fasse pas la distinction entre sa préférence actuelle pour la Nouvelle-Zélande et son ressenti à l'âge de sept ou huit ans lorsqu'il a déménagé en Australie.

Même si à l'époque, la stabilité de l'enfant était liée à une résidence différente de celle de ses parents, il était de toute façon trop jeune pour y prétendre. Sa stabilité dépendait donc de ses parents, qui déterminaient son lieu de résidence. La Cour a établi que la perception et l'opinion du fils devaient être prises en compte pour définir l'ensemble des aspects factuels de la résidence habituelle.

Elle en a conclu que l'opposition du fils à l'Australie n'était pas particulièrement marquée : il parlait en termes positifs de sa vie dans le pays, auquel il restait étroitement lié, puisqu'il entretenait notamment des relations avec ses camarades de classe et avec la famille de sa mère. La Cour a donc estimé que la résidence habituelle des enfants était située en Australie au moment de leur déplacement en Nouvelle-Zélande.

Acquiescement - art. 13(1)(a)


Lorsque la mère s'est aperçue que les enfants n'étaient pas en cours de sport comme prévu le 29 avril, elle s'est rendue à leur domicile pour demander à leur père où ils se trouvaient. Après avoir appris leur départ pour la Nouvelle-Zélande, elle s'est présentée le jour même aux autorités australiennes en charge de la délivrance des passeports afin de leur demander de ne pas émettre de passeport pour l'un de ses enfants sans son consentement et a engagé un avocat afin qu'il sollicite une ordonnance de résidence.

Elle a ainsi obtenu une ordonnance prévoyant le retour immédiat des enfants en Australie et a régulièrement pris contact avec eux ainsi qu'avec la famille de leur père par téléphone. La Cour en a conclu que ces démarches étaient révélatrices des efforts incontestables déployés par la mère pour assurer le retour des enfants et étaient donc incompatibles avec l'idée d'acquiescement.

Aucune preuve n'attestait de propos précis et catégoriques exprimant une quelconque acceptation du fait que les enfants vivent en Nouvelle-Zélande de façon permanente.  Au mieux, la mère aurait adopté une position ambivalente s'agissant d'un éventuel séjour dans le pays pendant les vacances. Le père est resté évasif quant au départ des enfants et a tenté de dissimuler ses véritables intentions à la mère à l'époque du déplacement et après que celui-ci a eu lieu.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)


Le père a allégué que la mère avait une consommation excessive d'alcool et menait une vie dissolue et irresponsable, ce qu'elle a catégoriquement réfuté. Il a affirmé que confier les enfants aux soins de leur mère les exposerait à un risque grave de danger ou les placerait dans une situation intolérable.

La Cour a estimé que pour faire valoir l'exception prévue par l'article 13(1)(b), le père devait prouver que le risque grave n'était pas dû au retour des enfants auprès de leur mère, mais à leur retour en Australie, du fait de l'incapacité des tribunaux à assurer leur protection (Re A. (A Minor) Abduction [1988] 1 FLR 365). En outre, les tribunaux d'États parties à la Convention de La Haye sont réputés assurer la protection des enfants à leur retour.

Le père a allégué que les tribunaux australiens n'étaient pas en mesure de garantir le bien-être de ses enfants, car rien ne l'assurait que leur avis serait représenté. La cour a rejeté cet argument. Les tribunaux australiens ont mis en œuvre plusieurs mécanismes afin d'auditionner les enfants et il n'y avait donc aucune raison de penser que ce ne serait pas le cas dans cette affaire.

En rejetant la position du père, la Cour a estimé que le retour des enfants auprès de leur mère ne les exposerait pas inévitablement à un grave risque de danger. Dans cette affaire, le seuil fixé pour l'exception de risque grave n'était clairement pas atteint.

La mère s'était engagée à ne pas faire exécuter l'ordonnance de garde quotidienne jusque fin janvier 2006 et en a simplement avisé le défendeur, ce qui écartait tout risque potentiel et maintenait le status quo en matière de garde jusqu'à ce que la question soit tranchée par le tribunal australien.

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)
La Cour a estimé que les deux enfants étaient suffisamment âgés et matures pour qu'il soit tenu compte de leur opinion. La fille ne s'opposait pas à un retour en Australie. Elle a affirmé préférer vivre avec sa mère et n'était pas enthousiasmée par l'idée de vivre en Nouvelle-Zélande de façon permanente. Elle disait être plus heureuse dans son école en Australie et souhaitait retrouver sa mère, sa famille et ses amis.

Le fils s'est opposé au retour en Australie mais cette opposition n'était pas ferme. Il préférait vivre en Nouvelle-Zélande plutôt qu'en Australie et, contrairement à sa sœur, il se réjouissait à l'idée d'y habiter à titre permanent. Il préférait vivre avec son père mais était content de partir en vacances en Australie rendre visite à sa mère.

La Cour a estimé qu'il était toujours très lié à l'Australie et était en mesure de s'adapter. Son inquiétude quant au fait de vivre à plein temps avec sa mère en Australie s'est dissipée lorsqu'on lui a assuré qu'il retournerait vivre avec son père après des vacances avec sa mère.

Les parents ne souhaitaient pas que leurs enfants soient séparés et tenaient à ce qu'ils soient considérés comme une seule entité.

La Cour a jugé que l'opposition du fils au retour en Australie était supplantée par des éléments contraires, en l'occurrence les objectifs de la Convention de La Haye, en vertu desquels les enfants devaient être immédiatement renvoyés dans leur lieu de résidence habituel.

Son opposition découlait en grande partie du fait qu'il préfère vivre avec son père et n'avait donc que peu de valeur. En effet, la question de la garde était liée au bien-être de l'enfant, un domaine dans lequel, en vertu de la Convention, les tribunaux du lieu de résidence habituel de l'enfant sont les plus à même de prendre une décision.

La Cour a estimé que la juridiction australienne était la plus compétente pour décider du droit de garde. Une procédure y était déjà entamée, et dans la mesure où les enfants avaient vécu en Australie en continu pendant quatre ans avant leur déplacement, les preuves les plus pertinentes devaient s'y trouver. Rien ne laissait penser que le retour du fils en Australie serait contraire à ses intérêts. La Cour a ordonné le retour des deux enfants en Australie.

Auteurs du résumé : Jamie Yule et Peter McEleavy

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)

-

Commentaire INCADAT

Résidence habituelle

L'interprétation de la notion centrale de résidence habituelle (préambule, art. 3 et 4) s'est révélée particulièrement problématique ces dernières années, des divergences apparaissant dans divers États contractants. Une approche uniforme fait défaut quant à la question de savoir ce qui doit être au cœur de l'analyse : l'enfant seul, l'enfant ainsi que l'intention des personnes disposant de sa garde, ou simplement l'intention de ces personnes. En conséquence notamment de cette différence d'approche, la notion de résidence peut apparaître comme un élément de rattachement très flexible dans certains États contractants ou un facteur de rattachement plus rigide et représentatif d'une résidence à long terme dans d'autres.

L'analyse du concept de résidence habituelle est par ailleurs compliquée par le fait que les décisions concernent des situations factuelles très diverses. La question de la résidence habituelle peut se poser à l'occasion d'un déménagement permanent à l'étranger, d'un déménagement consistant en un test d'une durée illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée ou simplement d'un séjour à l'étranger de durée déterminée.

Tendances générales:

La jurisprudence des cours d'appel fédérales américaines illustre la grande variété d'interprétations données au concept de résidence habituelle.
Approche centrée sur l'enfant

La cour d'appel fédérale des États-Unis d'Amérique du 6e ressort s'est prononcée fermement en faveur d'une approche centrée sur l'enfant seul :

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 935]

Voir aussi :

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 221].

Approche combinée des liens de l'enfant et de l'intention parentale

Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis d'Amérique des 3e et 8e ressorts ont privilégié une méthode où les liens de l'enfant avec le pays ont été lus à la lumière de l'intention parentale conjointe.
Le jugement de référence est le suivant : Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 83].

Voir aussi :

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 530] ;

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Dans cette dernière espèce, une distinction a été pratiquée entre la situation d'enfants très jeunes (où une importance plus grande est attachée à l'intention des parents - voir par exemple : Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 808]) et celle d'enfants plus âgés pour lesquels l'intention parentale joue un rôle plus limité.

Approche centrée sur l'intention parentale

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel fédérale du 9e ressort a rendu une décision dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301], qui s'est révélée très influente en exigeant la présence d'une intention ferme d'abandonner une résidence préexistante pour qu'un enfant puisse acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle.

Cette interprétation a été reprise et précisée par d'autres décisions rendues en appel par des juridictions fédérales de sorte qu'en l'absence d'intention commune des parents en cas de départ pour l'étranger, la résidence habituelle a été maintenue dans le pays d'origine, alors même que l'enfant a passé une période longue à l'étranger.  Voir par exemple :

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 777] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour prévu de 4 ans en Allemagne ;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 780] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 32 mois au Mexique ;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT : HC/E/USf 482] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 27 mois en Grèce.

La décision rendue dans l'affaire Mozes a également été approuvée par les cours fédérales d'appel du 2e et du 7e ressort :

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 776] ;

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 878] ;

Il convient de noter que dans l'affaire Mozes, la Cour a reconnu que si suffisamment de temps s'est écoulé et que l'enfant a vécu une expérience positive, la vie de l'enfant peut être si fermement attachée à son nouveau milieu qu'une nouvelle résidence habituelle doit pouvoir y être acquise nonobstant l'intention parentale contraire.

Autres États contractants

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position a évolué :

Autriche
La Cour suprême d'Autriche a décidé qu'une résidence de plus de six mois dans un État sera généralement caractérisée de résidence habituelle, quand bien même elle aurait lieu contre la volonté du gardien de l'enfant (puisqu'il s'agit d'une détermination factuelle du centre de vie).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
Au Québec, au contraire, l'approche est centrée sur l'enfant :
Dans Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 651], la Cour d'appel de Montréal a décidé que la résidence habituelle d'un enfant est simplement une question de fait qui doit s'apprécier à la lumière de toutes les circonstances particulières de l'espèce en fonction de la réalité vécue par l'enfant en question, et non celle de ses parents. Le séjour doit être d'une durée non négligeable (nécessaire au développement de liens par l'enfant et à son intégration dans son nouveau milieu) et continue, aussi l'enfant doit-il avoir un lien réel et actif avec sa résidence; cependant, aucune durée minimale ne peut être formulée.

Allemagne
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort également de la jurisprudence allemande :

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale a ainsi admis qu'une résidence habituelle puisse être acquise bien que l'enfant ait été illicitement déplacé dans le nouvel État de résidence :

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

La Cour constitutionnelle a confirmé l'analyse de la Cour régionale d'appel selon laquelle les enfants avaient acquis leur résidence habituelle en France malgré la nature de leur déplacement là-bas. La Cour a en effet considéré  que la résidence habituelle était un concept factuel, et les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur milieu local pendant les neuf mois qu'ils y avaient vécu.

Israël
Des approches alternatives ont été adoptées lors de la détermination de la résidence habituelle. Il est arrivé qu'un poids important ait été accordé à l'intention parentale. Voir :

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865] ;

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

Cependant, il a parfois été fait référence à une approche plus centrée sur l'enfant. Voir :

décision de la Cour suprême dans C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241 ;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 922].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Contrairement à l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Mozes, la cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Zélande a expressément rejeté l'idée que pour acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, il convient d'avoir l'intention ferme de renoncer à la résidence habituelle précédente. Voir :

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suisse
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort de la jurisprudence suisse :

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Royaume-Uni
L'approche standard est de considérer conjointement la ferme intention des personnes ayant la charge de l'enfant et la réalité vécue par l'enfant.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Pour un commentaire doctrinal des différentes approches du concept de résidence habituelle dans les pays de common law. Voir :

R. Schuz, « Habitual Residence of  Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice », Child and Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 13, No1, 2001, p.1 ;

R. Schuz, « Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context » Journal of Transnational Law and Policy, Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Installation à l'étranger pour une durée illimitée

Lorsque la durée de l'installation à l'étranger est illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée, il est également possible de perdre une résidence habituelle antérieure et d'en acquérir une nouvelle relativement rapidement. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles (cas ne relevant pas de la Convention)
Al Habtoor v. Fotheringham [2001] EWCA Civ 186 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 875] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
Callaghan v. Thomas [2001] NZFLR 1105 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 413] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Cameron v. Cameron 1996 SC 17, 1996 SLT 306, 1996 SCLR 25 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 71] ;

Moran v. Moran 1997 SLT 541 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 74] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Acquiescement

On constate que la plupart des tribunaux considèrent que l'acquiescement se caractérise en premier lieu à partir de l'intention subjective du parent victime :

Australie
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @213@];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @345@];

Autriche
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT @981@].

Dans cette affaire la Cour suprême autrichienne, qui prenait position pour la première fois sur l'interprétation de la notion d'acquiescement, souligna que l'acquiescement à état de fait provisoire ne suffisait pas à faire jouer l'exception et que seul l'acquiescement à un changement durable de la résidence habituelle donnait lieu à une exception au retour au sens de l'article 13(1) a).

Belgique
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE @545@];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 851];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

En l'espèce la Chambre des Lords britannique décida que l'acquiescement ne pouvait se déduire de remarques passagères et de lettres écrites par un parent qui avait récemment subi le traumatisme de voir ses enfants lui être enlevés par l'autre parent. 

Irlande
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

Israël
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL @807@] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @533@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @500@];

Afrique du Sud
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @499@];

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@].

De la même manière, on remarque une réticence des juges à constater un acquiescement lorsque le parent avait essayé d'abord de parvenir à un retour volontaire de l'enfant ou à une réconciliation. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @179@ ];

Irlande
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @84@];

Dans l'affaire australienne Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @290@] des négociations d'une durée de 12 mois avaient été considérées comme établissant un acquiescement, mais la cour décida, dans le cadre de son pouvoir souverain d'appréciation, de ne pas ordonner le retour.

Jurisprudence australienne et néo-zélandaise

Australie
En Australie une interprétation très stricte prévalait dans la jurisprudence ancienne rendue sur le fondement de l'article 13(1) b). Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @293@].

Toutefois, à la suite du jugement prononcé par la Court suprême Australienne dans les appels joints de:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority ; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401 ; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 346, 347], dans lesquels une interprétation littérale a été adoptée, l'attention se tourne désormais sur le risque encouru par l'enfant et la situation à laquelle il sera confronté après le retour.

Pour une décision rendue dans une situation où le parent ravisseur, ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, refuse de rentrer dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant avec ce dernier, voir :

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 544].

Pour un exemple de situation dans laquelle l'enfant est exposé à un risque grave de danger psychique, voir:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 871].

Pour des exemples d'affaires récentes dans lesquelles l'exception de risque grave a été rejetée, voir :

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 782].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Des décisions d'appel avaient initialement laissé entendre que le revirement de jurisprudence australien serait également suivi en Nouvelle-Zélande, voir :

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 495].

Toutefois, la décision récente de la Cour d'appel (Auckland) (Nouvelle-Zélande),:K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770], a réaffirmé (quoique dans obiter dictum) que l'interprétation qu'il convenait de suivre en Nouvelle-Zélande restait l'interprétation stricte donnée par la Cour d'appel dans :

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 90].

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).