CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

H.J. v. Secretary for Justice [2006] NZFLR 1005

INCADAT reference

HC/E/NZ 1127

Court

Country

NEW ZEALAND

Name

Wellington Court of Appeal

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
William Young P, Glazebrook and Panckhurst JJ

States involved

Requesting State

AUSTRALIA

Requested State

NEW ZEALAND

Decision

Date

11 April 2006

Status

Upheld on appeal

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2)

Order

Appeal allowed, return refused

HC article(s) Considered

12 13(1)(b) 18

HC article(s) Relied Upon

12 13(1)(b)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
A. v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA); Bocquet v. Ouzid 225 F.Supp.2d 1337 (S.D. Fla. 2002); C. (A Minor) (Abduction), Re [1989] 1 FLR 403; Cannon v. Cannon [2005] 1 WLR 32; C., Re [2004] EWHC 1245 (Fam); [2005] 1 F.L.R. 127; Dellabarca v. Christie [1999] 2 NZLR 548 (CA); Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M and C (1998) 24 Fam LR 178; D.P. v. The Commonwealth Central Authority (2001) 180 ALR 402; Ellis v. General Motors Acceptance Corp 160 F.3d 703 (11th Cir. 1998); El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice [2003] 1 NZLR 349; Fothergill v. Monarch Airlines Ltd [1981] AC 251; Furnes v. Reeves 362 F 3d 702 (11th Circuit, 2004); Graziano v. Daniels (1991) 14 Fam LR 697; H. (Abduction: Child of Sixteen), Re [2002] FLR 51; H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections), Re [1998] 1 FLR 422; L. (Abduction: Pending Criminal Proceedings), Re [1999] 1 FLR 433; Lozinska v. Bielwaski [1998] 56 OTC 59; K.S. v. L.S. [2003] NZFLR 817; Mendez Lynch v. Mendez Lynch 220 F. Supp.2d 1347 (M.D.Fla. 2002); Murray v. Director, Family Services ACT (1993) 16 Fam LR 982; N. (Minors) (Abduction), Re [1991] 1 FLR 413; Puttick v. Attorney General [1980] Fam 1; S. (A minor) (Abduction), Re [1991] 2 FLR 1 ; State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) 21 Fam LR 567; Townsend v. Director General, Department of Families, Youth and Community Care [1999] FamCA 285; Ulster-Swift Ltd v. Taunton Meat Haulage Ltd [1977] 1 WLR 625; Young v. United States 535 US 43, 122 S Ct. 1036 (2002).

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

General Approach to Interpretation
Pérez-Vera Report

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Return
After 12 Month Period

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Australian and New Zealand Case Law
Settlement of the child
Settlement of the Child
Commencement of Convention Proceedings
Concealment
Equitable Tolling
Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application concerned two children born on 2 May 1999 and 29 May 2000. The mother was a New Zealand citizen; the father, an Australian, was her stepson. Their relationship was intermittent and was characterized by the father's violence against the mother.

The mother removed the two children from Australia to New Zealand in February 2002 without informing the father. He became aware that the children were in New Zealand in May 2003. The father commenced proceedings for their return in December 2003.

On 15 April 2004, the Family Court at Hastings found the children to be settled in their new environment but nevertheless ordered that they be returned to Australia. The return order was upheld by the High Court on 15 June 2004. The mother appealed to the Court of Appeal.

Ruling

Appeal allowed and return refused; Article 12(2) had been proved to the standard required by the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention and discretion exercised not to make a return order.

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)


The mother alleged that the father was abusive. She cited incidents where he had thrown hot coffee at her and tied up one of the children with a clothes line. As a result of his violence, she obtained two protection orders.

The mother claimed that the Australian legal system was unable or unwilling to protect her and her children. The trial judge held that to refuse to return the children to Australia would be tantamount to declaring that its courts were unable to protect the children. This finding was undisturbed by the Court of Appeal.

Regarding the interpretation of the grave risk defence, the Court preferred the approach taken in K.S. v. L.S. [2003] NZFLR 817 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770] to that in El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice [2003] 1 NZLR 349 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 495].

The wide interpretation in the latter case was based on a misreading of the Perez-Vera Report. The grave risk defence was to be narrowly construed as explained by the Court of Appeal in A. v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 90].

The Court of Appeal confirmed that the risk of harm must be associated with the return of the child to the state of habitual residence. When considering whether the grave risk defence has been established, the ability of the courts of the state of habitual residence to protect the child from the alleged harm is likely to be a highly relevant consideration.

Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2)

Regarding what constituted settlement for the purpose of Article 12(2), the Court held that the approach of Thorpe LJ in Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA Civ 1330, [2005] 1 W.L.R. 32 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 598] should be followed in New Zealand. He identified three categories of case where proceedings for the return of the child are commenced one year after the wrongful removal.

The first involves a delayed reaction, for whatever reason, short of acquiescence on the part of the left-behind parent. In such cases, the court must determine whether the child is settled and whether or not to order the return of the child, taking into account the plaintiff's explanation for the delay.

The second category involves concealment by the abductor which may have caused or contributed to the delay in commencing proceedings. In these cases, the period gained by concealment should not be disregarded when calculating whether or not more than twelve months have elapsed. Such a tolling rule was rejected by Thorpe LJ as too crude an approach which risked producing results contrary to the policy of the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention.

As for the interpretation of settlement, he advocated a broad and purposive construction which would properly reflect the facts of each case. Furthermore, unlike the Family Court of Australia in Townsend v. Director General [1999] FamCA 285 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 290] he accepted the approach of Bracewell J in Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 106] whereby settlement comprised a physical and an emotional element.

Thorpe LJ labelled the third category "manipulative delay". This is where the taking parent deliberately intends to delay the start of proceedings beyond the twelve-month limit through his conduct. In such cases, the taking parent should not be able to take advantage of a delay which he engineered in order to invoke the Article 12(2) defence.

In determining whether it had discretion to order a return notwithstanding the availability of a defence under Article 12(2), again, the Court followed Thorpe LJ in Cannon v. Cannon. To confer an absolute defence on taking parents who concealed the whereabouts of children for long enough to be able to invoke the settled defence would encourage abduction and concealment.

The Court held that it retained a residual discretion under Article 18 to make a return order even when the child was settled in his new environment and the proceedings were commenced over twelve months after the removal. Where the Article 12(2) defence was established there was no presumption in favour of return.

If, nonetheless, the Court used its discretion under Article 18 to order a return, the best interests of the child were at least a relevant and perhaps a controlling consideration. Unlike the trial judge, the Court did not accept that the Article 12(2) defence was only available as a result of the mother's actions.

Refusing to order the return of the children to Australia did not undermine the integrity of the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention as such, an order was based on the Court's residual discretion as provided for in Article 18. Furthermore, the mother's conduct did not come within Thorpe LJ's third category of 'manipulative delay'. She did not go to ground in New Zealand and did not lead a life of concealment.

The father could have located her general whereabouts had he contacted her family, especially her brother. She had done nothing to cause the critical delay in the commencement of the proceedings which enabled her to invoke Article 12(2). The Court considered the mother's misconduct, if any, to be of limited moral gravity and unsurprising given the father's history of violence and his limited role in raising the children.

The Court noted that had the case been more evenly balanced, it would have been compelled to take into account developments since the trial judge's return order. The children were now more settled in New Zealand than they had been at the time of the original proceedings and so it was now even more unreasonable to order their return to Australia.

Authors of the summary: Jamie Yule and Peter McEleavy

INCADAT comment

See also the decision of the Supreme Court: Secretary for Justice (New Zealand Central Authority) v. H.J. [2007] 2 NZLR 289 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 882].

Pérez-Vera Report

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

After 12 Month Period

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Australian and New Zealand Case Law

Australia
In Australia a very strict approach was adopted initially with regard to Article 13(1) b), see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @294@];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @293@].

However, following the judgment of the High Court in the joint appeals:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @346@, @347@], where a literal interpretation of the exception was advocated, greater attention has now been focused on the risk to the child and the post return situation. 

In the context of a primary carer abducting parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence, see:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @544@].

With regard to a child facing a grave risk of psychological harm see:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 871].

For recent examples of cases where the grave risk of harm exception was rejected see:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @782@].

New Zealand
Appellate authority initially indicated that the change in emphasis adopted in Australia with regard to Article 13(1) b) would be followed in New Zealand also, see:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 495].

However, in the more recent decision: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770] the High Court of New Zealand (Auckland) has affirmed, albeit obiter, that the binding interpretation in New Zealand remained the strict interpretation given by the Court of Appeal in:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 90].

Settlement of the Child

A uniform interpretation has not emerged with regard to the concept of settlement; in particular whether it should be construed literally or rather in accordance with the policy objectives of the Convention.  In jurisdictions favouring the latter approach the burden of proof on the abducting parent is clearly greater and the exception is more difficult to establish.

Jurisdictions in which a heavy burden of proof has been attached to the establishment of settlement include:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 106]

In this case it was held that settlement is more than mere adjustment to surroundings. It involves a physical element of relating to, being established in, a community and an environment. It also has an emotional constituent denoting security and stability.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598]

For academic criticism of Re N. see:

Collins L. et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws, 14th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell, London, 2006, paragraph 19-121.

However, it may be noted that a more recent development in England has been the adoption of a child-centric assessment of settlement by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  This ruling may impact on the previous case law.

However there was no apparent weakening of the standard in the non-Convention case Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649,[INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 982].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107]

For Article 12(2) to be activated the interest of the child in not being uprooted must be so cogent that it outweighs the primary purpose of the Convention, namely the return of the child to the proper jurisdiction so that the child's future may be determined in the appropriate place.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 963]

A settled situation was one which could reasonably be relied upon to last as matters stood and did not contain indications that it was likely to change radically or to fall apart. There had therefore to be some projection into the future.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]

United States of America
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf  134]

A literal interpretation of the concept of settlement has been favoured in:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 291];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

The impact of the divergent interpretations is arguably most marked where very young children are concerned.

It has been held that settlement is to be considered from the perspective of a young child in:

Austria
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 378];

Australia
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 823];

State Central Authority v. C.R [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

Israel
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 938];

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/MC 510];

Switzerland
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (District Court of St. Gallen) (Switzerland), decision of 8 September 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 431].

A child-centric approach has also been adopted in several significant appellate decisions with regard to older children, with emphasis placed on the children's views.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

In contrast, a more objective assessment was favoured in the United States decision:

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S.2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 208]
The children, aged 3 and 1 1/2, had not established significant ties to their community in Brooklyn; they were not involved in school, extra-curricular, community, religious or social activities which children of an older age would be.

Commencement of Convention Proceedings

For the purposes of Art 12(1) the obligation on Contracting States to return children ‘forthwith' exists where less than 12 months has elapsed between the wrongful removal / retention and ‘the commencement of the proceedings before the judicial or administrative authority' in the Contracting State of refuge.

Courts in several Contracting States have considered the issue of the precise date of the commencement of such proceedings and have concluded that it is not enough for the purposes of Article 12(1) for the return application to have been filed with the relevant Central Authority in the State of refuge, rather civil return proceedings must have been initiated.  In this it has been noted that the reference to administrative authorities in Art 12 refers to States where administrative tribunals have jurisdiction for return petitions.

Canada
V.B.M. v. D.L.J. [2004] N.J. No. 321; 2004 NLCA 56 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 592].

United States of America
Wojcik v. Wojcik, 959 F. Supp. 413 (E.D. Mich. 1997) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 105].

The issue has been accepted without argument in both England & Wales and Scotland:

Re M. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1996] 1 FLR 315, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 21];

Perrin v. Perrin 1994 SC 45, 1995 SLT 81, 1993 SCLR 949, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 108]. 

Concealment

Where children are concealed in the State of refuge courts are reluctant to make a finding of settlement, even if many years elapse before their discovery:

Canada (7 years elapsed)
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 754];

See however the decision of the Cour d'appel de Montréal in:

Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

United Kingdom - Scotland (2 ½ years elapsed)
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, 2008 S.C.L.R. 329 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962];

Switzerland (4 years elapsed)
Justice de Paix du cercle de Lausanne (Magistrates' Court), decision of 6 July 2000, J 765 CIEV 112E [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 434];

United States of America
(2 ½ years elapsed)
Lops v. Lops, 140 F. 3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 125];

(3 years elapsed)
In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E. 2d 662 (1994) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 138].

Non-return orders have been made where notwithstanding the concealment the children have still been able to lead open lives:

United Kingdom - England & Wales (4 years elapsed)
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 815];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region) (4 ¾ years elapsed)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

Equitable Tolling

In accordance with this principle the one year time limit in Article 12 is only deemed to commence from the date of the discovery of the children. The rationale being that otherwise an abducting parent who concealed children for more than a year would be rewarded for their misconduct by creating eligibility for an affirmative defence which was not otherwise available.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 578].

The principle of 'equitable tolling' in the context of the time limit specified in Article 12 has been rejected in other jurisdictions, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 598];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/HK 825];

New Zealand
H.J. v. Secretary for Justice [2006] NZFLR 1005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 1127].

Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

Unlike the Article 13 exceptions, Article 12(2) does not expressly afford courts a discretion to make a return order if settlement is established.  Where this issue has arisen for consideration the majority judicial view has nevertheless been to apply the provision as if a discretion does exist, but this has arisen in different ways.

Australia
The matter has not been conclusively decided but there would appear to be appellate support for inferring a discretion, reference has been made to English and Scottish case law, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 276].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
English case law initially favoured inferring that a Convention based discretion existed by virtue of Article 18, see:

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598].

However, this interpretation was expressly rejected in the House of Lords decision Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  A majority of the panel held that the construction of Article 12(2) left the matter open that there was an inherent discretion where settlement was established.  It was pointed out that Article 18 did not confer any new power to order the return of a child under the Convention, rather it contemplated powers conferred by domestic law.

Ireland
In accepting the existence of a discretion reference was made to early English authority and Article 18.

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 391].

New Zealand
A discretion derives from the domestic legislation implementing the Convention, see:

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 882].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Whilst the matter was not explored in any detail, settlement not being established, there was a suggestion that a discretion would exist, with reference being made to Article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107].

There have been a few decisions in which no discretion was found to attach to Article 12(2), these include:

Australia
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232], - subsequently questioned;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 596] - subsequently overruled;

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

Article 18 not being included in the act implementing the Convention in Quebec, it is understood that courts do not possess a discretionary power where settlement is established.

For academic commentary on the use of discretion where settlement is established, see:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 204 et seq.;

R. Schuz, ‘In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Article 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly.

Faits

La demande concernait deux enfants nés les 2 mai 1999 et 29 mai 2000. La mère était de nationalité néo-zélandaise et le père, de nationalité australienne, était son beau-fils. La relation du couple était intermittente et caractérisée par les violences exercées par le père à l'encontre de la mère.

En février 2002, la mère a quitté l'Australie pour se rendre en Nouvelle-Zélande avec ses enfants sans en informer le père. Ce dernier a su que ses enfants se trouvaient en Nouvelle-Zélande en mai 2003. En décembre 2003, le père a entamé une procédure en vue du retour des enfants.

Le 15 avril 2004, la Family Court de Hastings a estimé que les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur nouvel milieu mais a tout de même ordonné leur retour en Australie. Le 15 juin 2004, la High Court a décidé de maintenir l'ordonnance de retour. La mère a interjeté appel.

Dispositif

Recours accueilli et retour refusé ; les conditions prévues par l'article 12(2) de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants étaient remplies et le juge a exercé son pouvoir d'appréciation pour ne pas ordonner le retour.

Motifs

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

La mère a affirmé que le père était violent, mentionnant des disputes au cours desquelles il lui avait jeté du café brûlant dessus et avait ligoté l'un des enfants au moyen d'une corde à linge. En conséquence de cette violence, elle a obtenu deux ordonnances de protection.

Elle a déclaré que le système judiciaire australien n'était pas en mesure de ni enclin à assurer sa protection ainsi que celle de ses enfants. La juridiction de première instance a estimé que refuser le retour des enfants en Australie reviendrait à affirmer que les tribunaux du pays sont incapables de garantir la protection des enfants. La Cour d'appel a confirmé ces conclusions.

S'agissant de l'interprétation de l'exception de risque grave, la Cour a préféré suivre l'approche adoptée dans l'affaire K.S. v. L.S. [2003] NZFLR 817 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770] à celle de l'affaire El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice [2003] 1 NZLR 349 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 495].

L'interprétation large de la seconde affaire était fondée sur une mauvaise lecture du rapport Pérez-Vera. L'exception de risque grave devait être interprétée de façon restrictive, comme expliqué par la Cour d'appel dans l'affaire A. v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 90].

La Cour d'appel a confirmé que le risque de danger devait être lié au retour de l'enfant dans son lieu de résidence habituel. Pour déterminer si l'exception de risque grave s'applique, la capacité des tribunaux de l'État de résidence habituelle à protéger l'enfant du danger allégué constitue un facteur important qu'il convient d'examiner attentivement.

Intégration de l'enfant - art. 12(2)
Se fondant sur les éléments constituant l'intégration au sens de l'article 12(2), la Cour a estimé que l'approche du juge Thorpe dans l'affaire Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA Civ 1330, [2005] 1 W.L.R. 32 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598] devait être suivie en Nouvelle-Zélande. Le juge a classé en trois catégories les affaires où la procédure de demande de retour des enfants a été entamée un an après le déplacement illicite.

La première catégorie implique une réaction tardive, pour une raison donnée, sans acquiescement de la part du parent privé de ses enfants. Dans un tel cas, la Cour doit déterminer si l'enfant s'est intégré et si elle doit ou non ordonner le retour en tenant compte des causes avancées par le plaignant pour expliquer le temps écoulé avant qu'il n'entame la procédure de retour.

Dans la seconde catégorie, une dissimulation de la part du ravisseur est à l'origine de la procédure tardive. Pour ce genre d'affaires, le temps ainsi gagné par le ravisseur ne devrait pas être négligé dans le calcul de la période écoulée depuis l'enlèvement, en particulier pour décider si plus ou moins de douze mois se sont passés. Le juge Thorpe a rejeté cette règle de calcul, l'estimant trop simpliste et susceptible de produire des résultats contraires aux objectifs de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants.

Pour ce qui est de la notion d'intégration, il a préconisé une interprétation large et raisonnée reflétant justement les faits propres à chaque affaire. En outre, contrairement à la Family Court of Australia dans l'affaire Townsend v. Director General [1999] FamCA 285 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 290], il a suivi l'approche du juge Bracewell dans Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 106] incluant les éléments physique et émotionnel dans le concept d'intégration.

Le juge Thorpe a regroupé les cas appartenant à la troisième catégorie sous le nom de « tactiques dilatoires ». Il s'agit des cas où le parent qui a emmené l'enfant tente délibérément, par son comportement, de retarder le début de la procédure afin que le délai de douze mois arrive à expiration. Dans de tels cas, le parent qui a emmené l'enfant ne devrait pas pouvoir profiter de ce retard qu'il a lui même causé afin d'invoquer l'exception prévue par l'article 12(2).

Pour déterminer si elle disposait du pouvoir d'appréciation pour ordonner le retour en dépit de l'exception prévue par l'article 12(2), la Cour a une fois encore suivi l'approche du juge Thorpe dans l'affaire Cannon v. Cannon, en vertu de laquelle conférer une défense absolue aux parents ayant emmené l'enfant et ayant dissimulé à l'autre parent le lieu où se trouvaient leurs enfants suffisamment longtemps pour invoquer l'exception d'intégration inciterait à l'enlèvement et à la dissimulation.

La Cour a estimé qu'elle disposait d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire en vertu de l'article 18 pour ordonner le retour en dépit de l'intégration de l'enfant dans son nouveau milieu et du fait que la procédure ait été entamée plus de douze mois après le déplacement. Lorsque l'exception prévue par l'article 12(2) était établie, il n'existait aucune présomption en faveur du retour. Si, malgré tout, la Cour a décidé de faire usage de son pouvoir d'appréciation en vertu de l'article 18 afin d'ordonner le retour, c'était avant tout guidée par l'intérêt de l'enfant.

Contrairement à la juridiction de première instance, la Cour d'appel n'a pas considéré que l'exception prévue à l'article 12(2) était uniquement le résultat des agissements de la mère. Refuser d'ordonner le retour des enfants en Australie ne compromettait pas l'intégrité de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants dans la mesure où une telle ordonnance était fondée sur le pouvoir discrétionnaire de la cour tel que prévu par l'article 18.

En outre, elle a estimé que le comportement de la mère n'entrait pas dans le cadre de la troisième catégorie des « tactiques dilatoires » définie par le juge Thorpe. Elle ne s'est pas terrée en Nouvelle-Zélande et ne s'est pas cachée. Le père aurait pu savoir où elle se trouvait s'il avait pris contact avec sa famille, notamment avec son frère.

Elle n'a rien fait de spécial pour causer le retard critique du début de la procédure lui ayant permis d'invoquer l'article 12(2). La Cour a considéré que la mauvaise conduite de la mère, le cas échéant, était d'une gravité morale limitée et qu'un tel comportement était prévisible au vu des antécédents de violence du père et de son rôle restreint dans l'éducation des enfants.

La Cour a noté que si l'affaire avait été plus justement équilibrée, elle aurait été contrainte de prendre en compte l'ensemble des développements depuis l'ordonnance de retour de la première instance. Les enfants étaient maintenant plus intégrés en Nouvelle-Zélande qu'à l'époque de la procédure initiale et il était donc d'autant moins raisonnable d'ordonner leur retour en Australie.

Auteurs du résumé : Jamie Yule et Peter McEleavy

Intégration de l'enfant - art. 12(2)

-

Commentaire INCADAT

Voir aussi la décision de la Cour Suprême : Secretary for Justice (New Zealand Central Authority) v H J [2007] 2 NZLR 289 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 882].

Rapport Pérez-Vera

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Retour après une période de plus d'un an

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Jurisprudence australienne et néo-zélandaise

Australie
En Australie une interprétation très stricte prévalait dans la jurisprudence ancienne rendue sur le fondement de l'article 13(1) b). Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @293@].

Toutefois, à la suite du jugement prononcé par la Court suprême Australienne dans les appels joints de:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority ; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401 ; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 346, 347], dans lesquels une interprétation littérale a été adoptée, l'attention se tourne désormais sur le risque encouru par l'enfant et la situation à laquelle il sera confronté après le retour.

Pour une décision rendue dans une situation où le parent ravisseur, ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, refuse de rentrer dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant avec ce dernier, voir :

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 544].

Pour un exemple de situation dans laquelle l'enfant est exposé à un risque grave de danger psychique, voir:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 871].

Pour des exemples d'affaires récentes dans lesquelles l'exception de risque grave a été rejetée, voir :

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 782].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Des décisions d'appel avaient initialement laissé entendre que le revirement de jurisprudence australien serait également suivi en Nouvelle-Zélande, voir :

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 495].

Toutefois, la décision récente de la Cour d'appel (Auckland) (Nouvelle-Zélande),:K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770], a réaffirmé (quoique dans obiter dictum) que l'interprétation qu'il convenait de suivre en Nouvelle-Zélande restait l'interprétation stricte donnée par la Cour d'appel dans :

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 90].

Intégration de l'enfant

La notion d'intégration ne fait pas encore l'objet d'une interprétation uniforme. La question se pose notamment de savoir si l'intégration doit s'entendre littéralement ou être interprétée à la lumière des objectifs de la Convention. Dans les États faisant prévaloir la deuxième alternative, la charge de la preuve est plus lourde pour le parent ravisseur et l'exception d'application plus rare.

Parmi les États les plus exigeants en ce qui concerne la preuve de l'intégration de l'enfant, on peut citer :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 106] ;
Dans cette espèce, il fut décidé que la notion d'intégration dépassait celle d'adaptation au nouveau milieu. L'intégration implique un élément de relation physique avec une communauté et un environnement. Elle contient un élément émotionnel traduisant la sécurité et la stabilité.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Pour un commentaire critique de Re N., voir :

L.Collins et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws: fourteenth edition, London, Sweet & Maxwell, 2006, para. 19 à 121.

Il convient toutefois de noter que plus récemment l'Angleterre a vu se développer une analyse de la notion d'intégration centrée sur l'enfant. On se réfèrera à la décision de la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. Cette décision pourrait remettre en cause la jurisprudence antérieure.

Toutefois cette décision n'a apparemment pas affaibli les exigences posées en la matière par la Common Law comme en témoigne Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 982].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Pour que l'article 12(2) trouve à s'appliquer, il faut que l'intérêt qu'a l'enfant à rester dans son nouveau milieu soit si fort qu'il dépasse l'objectif premier de la Convention selon lequel il appartient au juge du lieu de la résidence habituelle qu'avait l'enfant au moment de l'enlèvement de décider de l'avenir de celui-ci.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 963]

L'intégration existe dans les situations stables, dont on peut s'attendre qu'elles durent. Il convient d'opérer une certaine projection dans l'avenir.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962]

États-Unis d'Amérique
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf  134]

Une interprétation littérale du concept d'intégration a été préférée dans les États suivants :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 291];

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825]

L'impact de la différence d'interprétation est sans doute plus marqué lorsque ce sont des jeunes enfants qui sont en cause.

Il a été décidé que l'intégration doit s'apprécier du point de vue du jeune enfant en :

Autriche
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 378] ;

Australie
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 823] ;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824] ;

Israël
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 938] ;

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/MC 510] ;

Suisse
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (Cour cantonale de St. Gallen) (Suisse), décision du 8 Septembre 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 431].

Une approche centrée sur l'enfant a également été adoptée dans des décisions importantes rendues à propos d'enfants plus grands, l'accent étant mis sur l'opinion de l'enfant.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

En revanche, c'est une analyse plus objective de l'intégration qui a été préférée aux États-Unis d'Amérique :

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S. 2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 208];
Les enfants, âgés de 3 ans et 1 an ½ n'avaient pas établi de liens importants dans leur nouveau milieu de Brooklyn. Ils ne participaient pas aux activités scolaires, extrascolaires, religieuses, sociales ou communautaires auxquelles des enfants plus âgés se livrent.

Début de la procédure aux termes de la Convention

39;article 12(1) impose aux États contractants l'obligation d'ordonner le retour immédiat de l'enfant lorsque moins de 12 mois se sont écoulés entre le déplacement ou le non-retour illicite et « le moment de l'introduction de la demande devant l'autorité judiciaire ou administrative » de l'État contractant où se trouve l'enfant.

Les juridictions de plusieurs États contractants ont envisagé la question du moment exact de l'introduction de l'instance et conclu qu'il ne suffit pas dans le cadre de l'article 12(1) qu'une demande ait été adressée à l'Autorité centrale de l'État de refuge, mais qu'il fallait qu'une procédure judiciaire ait été entamée. Il a été observé que la référence aux autorités administratives dans l'article 12 s'explique par le fait que dans certains États les demandes de retour relèvent de la compétence des juridictions administratives.

Canada
V.B.M. v. D.L.J. [2004] N.J. No. 321; 2004 NLCA 56 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 592]. 

États-Unis d'Amérique
Wojcik v. Wojcik, 959 F. Supp. 413 (E.D. Mich. 1997) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 105]. 

L'Angleterre, le Pays de Galles et l'Écosse ne se sont pas opposés à la décision:

Re M. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1996] 1 FLR 315, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 21] ;

Perrin v. Perrin 1994 SC 45, 1995 SLT 81, 1993 SCLR 949, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 108].

Dissimulation de l'enfant

Lorsque des enfants sont cachés dans l'État de refuge, les juges sont réticents à l'idée de considérer qu'il y a eu intégration, même lorsque de nombreuses années se sont écoulées entre le déplacement et la localisation :

Canada (7 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/CA 754] ;

Voir cependant la décision de la Cour d'appel de Montréal dans :

Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse (2 ans et demi entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962];

Suisse (4 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Justice de Paix du cercle de Lausanne, 6 juillet 2000, J 765 CIEV 112E, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 434];

États-Unis d'Amérique
(2 ans et demi  entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Lops v. Lops, 140 F. 3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 125] ;

(3 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E. 2d 662 (1994), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 138]. 

Dans certains États, le retour d'enfants a été ordonné alors même qu'ils menaient une vie relativement ouverte en dépit du fait qu'ils étaient recherchés :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles (4 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 815] ;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong) (4 ans 3/4 entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825].

Principe de la suspension équitable du délai de prescription (« equitable tolling »)

L'utilisation de ce principe impose que le calcul du délai d'un an contenu à l'article 12 ne commence qu'à partir du moment où l'enfant a pu être localisé. Un parent ravisseur qui a caché l'enfant pendant plus d'un an pourrait sinon bénéficier d'une exception (qui devrait lui être fermée en principe), et ce, pour la seule raison qu'il s'est comporté de manière inacceptable.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

Le principe de la suspension équitable du délai de prescription (« equitable tolling ») a été rejeté dans le contexte de l'application de l'article 12(2) par certains États :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598] ;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
H.J. v. Secretary for Justice [2006] NZFLR 1005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1127].

Pouvoir d'ordonner le retour nonobstant l'intégration

Au contraire de l'exception de l'article 13, l'article 12(2) ne prévoit pas expressément la possibilité pour les juridictions saisies de la demande de retour de disposer d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour ordonner le retour en cas d'intégration. Lorsque la question s'est posée, il apparaît néanmoins que les cours ont majoritairement  admis le caractère discrétionnaire de l'application de cette disposition.  La question s'est toutefois posée en des termes très variables :

Australie
La question n'a pas été définitivement résolue mais il semble que la Cour d'appel a sous-entendu le caractère discrétionnaire de l'article 12(2), référence faite à la jurisprudence anglaise et écossaise. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 276].

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
La jurisprudence anglaise déduisait l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire de l'article 18, voir :

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Toutefois cette interprétation a été expressément rejetée par la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. La majorité des juges estima que l'article 12(2) laissait ouverte la question de savoir si le retour pouvait discrétionnairement être ordonné nonobstant l'intégration. Les juges soulignèrent que l'article 18 ne donne pas un nouveau pouvoir d'ordonner le retour d'un enfant mais se réfère simplement à un pouvoir préexistant en droit interne.

Irlande
Il a été fait référence à la jurisprudence ancienne anglaise et à l'article 18 pour justifier l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire :

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 391];

Nouvelle-Zélande
En Nouvelle-Zélande, le pouvoir discrétionnaire est prévu par la législation de mise en œuvre de la Convention. Voir :

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J.) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 882]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Quoique la question n'ait pas été envisagée en détail puisqu'en l'espèce il n'y avait pas eu intégration, il fut suggéré que l'application de l'exception avait un caractère discrétionnaire, référence étant faite à l'article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Parmi les décisions qui n'ont pas usé de pouvoir discrétionnaire dans le cadre de l'application de l'article 12(2), voir :

Australie
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232], - ultérieurement discuté;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, (Fam), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/UKe 596] - ultérieurement remis en cause;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

L'article 18 n'ayant pas été reproduit dans la loi mettant en œuvre la Convention au Québec, il a été considéré que le juge ne dispose pas d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire en cas d'intégration.

Sur l'usage d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire lorsque l'enfant enlevé s'est intégré dans son nouveau milieu, voir :

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 204 et seq.

R. Schuz, « In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Art 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention » Child and Family Law Quarterly, 2008.