CASE

No full text available

Case Name

CA Rennes, 28 juin 2011, No de RG 11/02685

INCADAT reference

HC/E/FR 1129

Court

Country

FRANCE

Name

Cour d'appel de Rennes, Chambre 6

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Salomon (pdt), Janin, Fontaine (conseillers)

States involved

Requesting State

MEXICO

Requested State

FRANCE

Decision

Date

28 June 2011

Status

Upheld on appeal

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a) | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2) | Jurisdiction Issues - Art. 16 | Procedural Matters

Order

Appeal allowed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

3 12 13(1)(a) 13(1)(b) 13(2) 16 19

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to

-

Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
Actual Exercise

Exceptions to Return

Acquiescence
Acquiescence
Grave Risk of Harm
French Case Law
Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection
Parental Influence on the Views of Children

Implementation & Application Issues

Procedural Matters
Costs

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The case concerned two children born in Mexico in 2001 and 2004 to a Mexican father and French mother. After the parents separated in 2006, the mother continued to live in Mexico with the children until 2010. In June 2010, she moved to France. The children joined her in July. In October, she applied to the family judge at the Regional Tribunal of Lorient (Tribunal de grande instance de Lorient) for their custody.

In December 2010, the father applied for the children's return through the Mexican authorities. On 7 April 2011, the family judge of Rennes Regional Court (Tribunal de grande instance de Rennes) found the children's retention to be wrongful but refused to order their return, owing to their objections. The father and Public Prosecutor's Office appealed against that decision.

Ruling

Appeal allowed, return ordered. The removal was wrongful and no exception raised was applicable.

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

It was not disputed that, under Mexican family law, the parents exercised over their children parental authority which can be forfeited, in the situations listed by law, pursuant to a court ruling. According to the mother, the father had forfeited parental authority but she did not provide evidence of any statutory or court provision in support. On the other hand, the father had produced recent and detailed attestations showing that he had indeed exercised parental responsibility before and after the separation.

In particular, it was proven that the mother had entrusted the children to their father's custody at all week-ends during the time when the children had remained in Mexico after the mother's departure for France and that their return was planned for 23 August 2010. The mother had accordingly not proved in what respect the father did not exercise custody at the time of the retention, within the meaning of Art. 5(1)(a).

Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a)

Having found that the application had been made less than a year after the children's retention, the Court of Appeal (Cour d'appel de Rennes) considered that while the father had formally applied to the Mexican Central Authority three and a half months after the children's retention, implied acquiescence to the retention could not be deduced from that fact, "having regard to the dossier he had to establish for the purpose, or from his stay in France in November 2010" to see his children, as the father "actually sought to maintain communication among them against the background of a situation imposed on him".

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The mother mentioned the pollution of Mexico City, the insecurity due to crime in the Mexico City metropolis, and earthquake risks. She did not, however, show how these risks affected the children personally and directly. She had not mentioned those factors as justification for her decision to move to France, in a document sent to the father in 2010, but had referred to financial and family difficulties. In addition, the Court of Appeal noted that these factors had not deterred her from living in Mexico from 1998 to 2010 and raising two children there.

It further noted that the mother had not seen fit to apply to the Mexican authorities for permission to move to France with the children, without explaining the reasons which in her view could jeopardise her right to a fair trial in Mexico. The Court of Appeal made it clear that it did not affirm that the pleas raised by the mother were groundless. They might be used in connection with the issue of custody, but were not sufficient proof of a grave risk.

Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

The lower-court judges had drawn the consequences of the elder child's spontaneous and sincere objection to a return to refuse to order the children's return. The Court of Appeal pointed out, however, that the children had been with their mother alone for many months, without regular relations with the father. The mother's influence on the feelings expressed by the children in their interview could therefore not be disregarded.

In addition, it was not specified how the Family Court had explained to the children the difference between the return contemplated pursuant to the Convention and the ruling on the merits regarding custody. The child's statements reflected her desire to live in France but not a reasoned objection (having regard to her age and maturity) to a return to Mexico in connection with a discussion and decision by the appropriate court to rule on the merits of the rights of custody.

Jurisdiction Issues - Art. 16

The father petitioned the Court of Appeal to hold that the Mexico City court had jurisdiction to rule upon the children's custody and residence. The Court held that the issue had not been referred to it, and if it had been, it could only have declined jurisdiction since under Art. 16, it could not have ruled on the merits of the rights of custody.

Procedural Matters

The mother applied for the children to be interviewed. The Court of Appeal pointed out that Article 388-1 of the French Civil Code allowed a minor capable of understanding to testify to the court in any proceedings relating to it. It pointed out, however, that the children concerned, aged 9 and a half and 6 and a half, did not have in fact the "understanding required to express before a court their feelings not about the issue of their habitual residence, which was not asked of the court, but of their return to Mexico" under the Convention. Applying the final paragraph of Article 26, the Court of Appeal found the mother liable for the father's travel and representation expenses and the costs of the children's return to Mexico.

Author of summary: Aude Fiorini

INCADAT comment

By a ruling dated 12 April 2012, available on INCADAT [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 1155], the Supreme Court dismissed the mother's appeal against this ruling, thereby upholding the order for the children's return to Mexico.

Actual Exercise

Courts in a variety of Contracting States have afforded a wide interpretation to what amounts to the actual exercise of rights of custody, see:

Australia
Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 68];

Austria
8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof, 30/10/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 548];

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 545];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. Cour d'Appel at Aix en Provence (6e Ch.) 23 March 1989, 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529 note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° 5704759 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 704];

CA Aix en Provence 8/10/2002, L. v. Ministère Public, Mme B et Mesdemoiselles L (N° de rôle 02/14917) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 509];

Germany
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 822];

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 491];

New Zealand
The Chief Executive of the Department for Courts for R. v. P., 20 September 1999, Court of Appeal of New Zealand [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 304];

United Kingdom - Scotland
O. v. O. 2002 SC 430 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 507].

In the above case the Court of Session stated that it might be going too far to suggest, as the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit had done in Friedrich v Friedrich that only clear and unequivocal acts of abandonment might constitute failure to exercise custody rights. However, Friedrich was fully approved of in a later Court of Session judgment, see:

S. v S., 2003 SLT 344 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 577].

This interpretation was confirmed by the Inner House of the Court of Session (appellate court) in:

AJ. V. FJ. 2005 CSIH 36, 2005 1 S.C. 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803].

Switzerland
K. v. K., Tribunal cantonal de Horgen [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CZ 299];

449/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 433];

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953];

United States of America
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 82];

Sealed Appellant v. Sealed Appellee, 394 F.3d 338 (5th Cir. 2004), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 779];

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

See generally Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E., 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 84 et seq.

Acquiescence

There has been general acceptance that where the exception of acquiescence is concerned regard must be paid in the first instance to the subjective intentions of the left behind parent, see:

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 213];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 345];

Austria
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 981].

Considering the issue for the first time, Austria's supreme court held that acquiescence in a temporary state of affairs would not suffice for the purposes of Article 13(1) a), rather there had to be acquiescence in a durable change in habitual residence.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 545];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 851];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

In this case the House of Lords affirmed that acquiescence was not to be found in passing remarks or letters written by a parent who has recently suffered the trauma of the removal of his children.

Ireland
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

Israel
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 807];

New Zealand
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 533];

United Kingdom - Scotland
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 500];

South Africa
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 499];

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841].

In keeping with this approach there has also been a reluctance to find acquiescence where the applicant parent has sought initially to secure the voluntary return of the child or a reconciliation with the abducting parent, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [INCADAT cite:  HC/E/UKe 179];

Ireland
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

United States of America
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 84];

In the Australian case Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 290] negotiation over the course of 12 months was taken to amount to acquiescence but, notably, in the court's exercise of its discretion it decided to make a return order.

French Case Law

The treatment of Article 13(1) b) by French courts has evolved, with a permissive approach being replaced by a more robust interpretation.

The judgments of France's highest jurisdiction, the Cour de cassation, from the mid to late 1990s, may be contrasted with more recent decisions of the same court and also with decisions of the court of appeal. See:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 juillet 1994, Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt ; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 103];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 21 novembre 1995 (Pourvoi N° 93-20140), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 514];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, (N° de pourvoi : 98-17902), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 498];

And contrast with:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 25 janvier 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 02-17411), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 708];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 juin 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 04-16942), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 844];

Cass. Civ 1ère 13 juillet 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 05-10519), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 845];

CA. Amiens 4 mars 1998, n°5704759, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 704];

CA. Grenoble 29 mars 2000 M. c. F., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

CA. Paris 7 février 2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2001/21768), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 849];

CA. Paris, 20/09/2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2002/13730), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 850];

CA. Aix en Provence 8 octobre 2002, L c. Ministère Public, Mme B. et Mesdemoiselles L. (N° de rôle 02/14917) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 509];

CA. Paris 27 octobre 2005, 05/15032 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 814];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 décembre 2005 (N° de pourvoi :05-12934) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @889@];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 November 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-15692) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @890@].

Recent examples where Article 13(1) b) has been upheld include:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 Décembre 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-22119) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @891@];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 17 Octobre 2007 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @946@]. 

The interpretation given by the Cour d'appel de Rouen in 2006, whilst obiter, does recall the more permissive approach to Article 13(1) b) favoured in the early 1990s, see:

CA. Rouen, 9 Mars 2006, N°05/04340 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @897@].

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Parental Influence on the Views of Children

Courts applying Article 13(2) have recognised that it is essential to determine whether the objections of the child concerned have been influenced by the abducting parent. 

Courts in a variety of Contracting States have dismissed claims under Article 13(2) where it is apparent that the child is not expressing personally formed views, see in particular:

Australia
Director General of the Department of Community Services v. N., 19 August 1994, transcript, Family Court of Australia (Sydney) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 231];

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 754];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 87].

Although not at issue in the case, the Court of Appeal affirmed that little or no weight should be given to objections if the child had been influenced by the abducting parent or some other person.

Finland
Court of Appeal of Helsinki: No. 2933 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FI 863];

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947].
 
The Court of Appeal of Bordeaux limited the weight to be placed on the objections of the children on the basis that before being interviewed they had had no contact with the applicant parent and had spent a long period of time with the abducting parent. Moreover the allegations of the children had already been considered by the authorities in the children's State of habitual residence.

Germany
4 UF 223/98, Oberlandesgericht Düsseldorf, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 820];

Hungary
Mezei v. Bíró 23.P.500023/98/5. (27. 03. 1998, Central District Court of Budapest; First Instance); 50.Pkf.23.732/1998/2. 16. 06. 1998., (Capital Court as Appellate Court) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HU 329];

Israel
Appl. App. Dist. Ct. 672/06, Supreme Court 15 October 2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 885];

United Kingdom - Scotland
A.Q. v. J.Q., 12 December 2001, transcript, Outer House of the Court of Session (Scotland) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 415];

Spain
Auto Audiencia Provincial Nº 133/2006 Pontevedra (Sección 1ª), Recurso de apelación Nº 473/2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 887];

Restitución de Menores 534/1997 AA [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 908].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has held that the views of children could never be entirely independent; therefore a distinction had to be made between a manipulated objection and an objection, which whilst not entirely autonomous, nevertheless merited consideration, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795].

United States of America
Robinson v. Robinson, 983 F. Supp. 1339 (D. Colo. 1997) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 128].

In this case the District Court held that it would be unrealistic to expect a caring parent not to influence the child's preference to some extent, therefore the issue to be ascertained was whether the influence was undue.

It has been held in two cases that evidence of parental influence should not be accepted as a justification for not ascertaining the views of children who would otherwise be heard, see:

Germany
2 BvR 1206/98, Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal Constitutional Court) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 233];

New Zealand
Winters v. Cowen [2002] NZFLR 927 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 473].

Equally parental influence may not have a material impact on the child's views, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

The Court of Appeal did not dismiss the suggestion that the child's views may have been influenced or coloured by immersion in an atmosphere of hostility towards the applicant father, but it was not prepared to give much weight to such suggestions.

In an Israeli case the court found that the child had been brainwashed by his mother and held that his views should therefore be given little weight. Nevertheless, the Court also held that the extreme nature of the child's reactions to the proposed return, which included the threat of suicide, could not be ignored.  The court concluded that the child would face a grave risk of harm if sent back, see:

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 834].

Costs

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Faits

L'affaire concernait deux enfants nés au Mexique en 2001 et 2004 de père mexicain et de mère française. Les parents s'étant séparés en 2006, la mère avait continué de vivre au Mexique avec les enfants jusqu'en 2010. En juin 2010, elle vint s'installer en France. En juillet, les enfants la rejoignirent. En octobre, elle en demanda la garde au juge aux affaires familiales du Tribunal de grande instance de Lorient.

En décembre 2010, le père demanda le retour des enfants par l'intermédiaire des autorités mexicaines. Le 7 avril 2011, le juge aux affaires familiales du Tribunal de grande instance de Rennes constata l'illicéité du non-retour des enfants mais refusa d'ordonner leur retour en raison de leur opposition. Le père et le Ministère public formèrent appel de cette décision.

Dispositif

Recours accueilli, retour ordonné. Le déplacement était illicite et aucune exception soulevée n'était applicable.

Motifs

Droit de garde - art. 3

Il n'était pas contesté que, selon le droit de la famille mexicain, les parents exerçaient à l'égard de leurs enfants l'autorité parentale qui se perd, dans les cas énumérés par la loi, par décision de justice. Selon la mère, le père avait perdu l'exercice de l'autorité parentale mais elle ne justifiait d'aucune disposition légale ou juridictionnelle en ce sens. Au contraire le père produisait des attestations récentes et circonstanciées montrant qu'il avait effectivement exercé ses responsabilités paternelles avant et après la séparation.

En particulier, il était établi que la mère avait confié les enfants à la garde de leur père pour toutes les fins de semaine pendant la période où les enfants étaient restés au Mexique après le départ de la mère en France et que leur retour était prévu le 23 août 2010. La mère n'avait donc pas démontré en quoi le père n'exerçait pas la garde au moment du non-retour au sens de l'art 5(1)(a).

Acquiescement - art. 13(1)(a)

Ayant constaté que la demande avait été formée moins d'un an après le non-retour des enfants, la Cour d'appel de Rennes estima que si le père avait formellement saisi l'Autorité centrale mexicaine trois mois et demi après le non-retour des enfants, on ne pouvait déduire de ce fait « compte tenu du dossier qu'il a dû constituer à cette fin, non plus que de son séjour en France en novembre 2010 » pour voir ses enfants, un acquiescement tacite au non-retour, le père ayant « effectivement tenté de maintenir la communication entre eux dans le contexte d'une situation qui lui était impose ».

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)


La mère citait la pollution existant à Mexico, l'insécurité générée par la délinquance dans la métropole de Mexico ainsi que les risques sismiques. Toutefois elle ne montrait pas en quoi ces risques touchaient personnellement et directement les enfants. Elle n'avait pas mentionné ces facteurs pour justifier son choix de s'établir en France dans un document adressé au père en 2010, mais avait fait état de difficultés financières et familiales. En outre, la Cour nota que ces facteurs ne l'avaient pas dissuadé de vivre à Mexico de 1998 à 2010 et d'y avoir élevé deux enfants.

Elle releva encore que la mère n'avait pas cru opportun de demander l'autorisation aux autorités mexicaines de s'établir en France avec les enfants, sans expliquer les raisons qui, selon elle, pourraient compromettre son droit à un procès équitable au Mexique. La Cour clarifia qu'elle n'affirmait pas que les éléments soulevés par la mère étaient dénués de fondement. Ils pourraient être éventuellement utilisés dans le cadre de la question de la garde, mais ne suffisaient pas à établir l'existence d'un risque grave de danger.

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)
Le premier juge avait tiré les conséquences de l'opposition spontanée et sincère de l'aînée des enfants au retour pour refuser d'ordonner le retour des enfants. La Cour d'appel fit néanmoins observer que les enfants se trouvaient auprès de leur mère seule depuis de nombreux mois, sans relations régulières avec leur père. On ne pouvait donc faire abstraction de l'influence de la mère sur les sentiments exprimés par les enfants pendant leur audition. De plus, il n'était pas indiqué de quelle manière le juge aux affaires familiales avait expliqué aux enfants la différence entre le retour envisagé dans le cadre de la Convention et la décision au fond concernant la garde.

Les déclarations de l'enfant reflétaient son désir de vivre en France mais pas une opposition raisonnée (eu égard à son âge et à sa maturité) à un retour au Mexique dans la perspective d'un débat et d'une décision de la juridiction compétente en vue de statuer sur le fond du droit de garde.

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)

-

Questions de compétence - art. 16

Le père demandait à la Cour de déclarer le tribunal de Mexico compétent pour statuer sur la garde et la résidence des enfants. La Cour indiqua qu'elle n'était pas saisie de ce litige et si elle l'avait été, elle n'aurait pu que renvoyer les parties à mieux se pourvoir dès lors que, en application de l'art 16, elle n'aurait pu statuer sur le fond du droit de garde.

Questions procédurales

La mère demandait l'audition des enfants. La Cour rappela que l'article 388-1 du Code civil permettait au mineur capable de discernement d'être entendu par le juge dans toute procédure le concernant. Elle indiqua cependant que les enfants en cause, âgés de 9 ans et demi et 6 ans et demi ne disposaient pas effectivement du « discernement nécessaire pour exprimer devant une cour leur sentiment non sur la question du lieu de leur résidence habituelle qui n'est pas posée à la cour, mais sur celle de leur retour au Mexique » dans le cadre de la Convention. Appliquant le dernier alinéa de l'article 26, la Cour mit à la charge de la mère le paiement des frais de voyage et de représentation du père et les frais de retour des enfants au Mexique.

Auteur du résumé : Aude Fiorini

Commentaire INCADAT

Par un arrêt du 12 avril 2012, disponible sur INCADAT [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1155], la Cour de cassation a rejeté le pourvoi interjeté par la mère contre la présente décision, confirmant ainsi l'ordonnance de retour des enfants au Mexique.

Exercice effectif de la garde

Les juridictions d'une quantité d'États parties ont également privilégié une interprétation large de la notion d'exercice effectif de la garde. Voir :

Australie
Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 68] ;

Autriche
8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof, 30/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548] ;

Belgique
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/BE 545] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [1996] 1 FCR 46, [1995] Fam Law 351 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 37] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. Cour d'Appel d'Aix en Provence (6e Ch.) 23 Mars 1989, 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529 note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704] ;

CA Aix en Provence 8/10/2002, L. v. Ministère Public, Mme B et Mesdemoiselles L (N° de rôle 02/14917) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 509] ;

Allemagne
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 822] ;

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 491] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
The Chief Executive of the Department for Courts for R. v. P., 20 September 1999, Court of Appeal of New Zealand [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 304] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
O. v. O. 2002 SC 430 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 507].

Dans cette décision, la « Court of Session », Cour suprême écossaise, estima que ce serait peut-être aller trop loin que de suggérer, comme les juges américains dans l'affaire Friedrich v. Friedrich, que seuls des actes d'abandon clairs et dénués d'ambiguïté pouvaient être interprétés comme impliquant que le droit de garde n'était pas exercé effectivement. Toutefois, « Friedrich » fut approuvée dans une affaire écossaise subséquente:

S. v. S., 2003 SLT 344 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 577].

Cette interprétation fut confirmée par la cour d'appel d'Écosse :

A.J. v. F.J. 2005 CSIH 36 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Suisse
K. v. K., 13 février 1992, Tribunal cantonal de Horgen [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/SZ 299] ;

449/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433];

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Friedrich v. Friedrich 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 82] ;

Sealed Appellant v. Sealed Appellee, 15 December 2004, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 779] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029].

Sur cette question, voir : P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, Oxford, 1999 p. 84 et seq.

Acquiescement

On constate que la plupart des tribunaux considèrent que l'acquiescement se caractérise en premier lieu à partir de l'intention subjective du parent victime :

Australie
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @213@];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @345@];

Autriche
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT @981@].

Dans cette affaire la Cour suprême autrichienne, qui prenait position pour la première fois sur l'interprétation de la notion d'acquiescement, souligna que l'acquiescement à état de fait provisoire ne suffisait pas à faire jouer l'exception et que seul l'acquiescement à un changement durable de la résidence habituelle donnait lieu à une exception au retour au sens de l'article 13(1) a).

Belgique
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE @545@];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 851];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

En l'espèce la Chambre des Lords britannique décida que l'acquiescement ne pouvait se déduire de remarques passagères et de lettres écrites par un parent qui avait récemment subi le traumatisme de voir ses enfants lui être enlevés par l'autre parent. 

Irlande
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

Israël
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL @807@] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @533@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @500@];

Afrique du Sud
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @499@];

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@].

De la même manière, on remarque une réticence des juges à constater un acquiescement lorsque le parent avait essayé d'abord de parvenir à un retour volontaire de l'enfant ou à une réconciliation. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @179@ ];

Irlande
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @84@];

Dans l'affaire australienne Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @290@] des négociations d'une durée de 12 mois avaient été considérées comme établissant un acquiescement, mais la cour décida, dans le cadre de son pouvoir souverain d'appréciation, de ne pas ordonner le retour.

Jurisprudence française

Le traitement de l'article 13(1) b) a évolué. L'interprétation permissive initialement privilégiée par les cours a fait place à une interprétation plus stricte.

Les jugements de la plus haute juridiction française, la Cour de cassation, rendus du milieu à la fin des années 1990 contrastent avec la position des juridictions d'appel et des arrêts de cassation plus récents. Voir :

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 juillet 1994, Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt ; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 103] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 21 novembre 1995 (Pourvoi N° 93-20140), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 514] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, (N° de pourvoi : 98-17902), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 498] ;

Et comparer avec:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 25 janvier 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 02-17411), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 708] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 juin 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 04-16942), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 844] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 13 juillet 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 05-10519), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 845] ;

CA. Amiens 4 mars 1998, n°5704759, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704] ;

CA. Grenoble 29 mars 2000 M. c. F., [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

CA. Paris 7 février 2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2001/21768), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 849] ;

CA. Paris, 20/09/2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2002/13730), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 850] ;

CA. Aix en Provence 8 octobre 2002, L c. Ministère Public, Mme B. et Mesdemoiselles L. (N° de rôle 02/14917) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 509] ;

CA. Paris 27 octobre 2005, 05/15032 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 décembre 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 05-12934) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @889@] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 November 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-15692) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @890@].

Pour des exemples récents où le retour a été refusé sur le fondement de l'article 13(1) b) :

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 Décembre 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-22119) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @891@] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 17 Octobre 2007 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @946@]. 

L'interprétation donnée à l'article 13(1) b) par la Cour d'appel de Rouen en 2006, quoique simplement obiter, rappelle l'interprétation permissive qui était constante au début des années 1990. Voir :

CA. Rouen, 9 Mars 2006, N°05/04340 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @897@].

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Influence parentale sur l'opinion de l'enfant

Les juridictions appliquant l'article 13(2) ont reconnu qu'il était essentiel de définir si l'opposition de l'enfant au retour avait été influencée par le parent ravisseur.

Les juges de nombreux États contractants ont rejeté les arguments fondés sur l'article 13(2) lorsqu'il était clair que l'enfant n'exprimait pas une opinion indépendante.

Voir notamment :

Australie
Director General of the Department of Community Services v. N., 19 août 1994, transcription, Family Court of Australia (Sydney), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 231] ;

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 754] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 87].

Bien que la question ne se soit pas posée en l'espèce, la Cour d'appel a affirmé que peu ou pas de poids devait être accordé à l'opposition d'un enfant si celui-ci a été influencé par le parent ravisseur ou toute autre personne.

Finlande
Cour d'appel d'Helsinki: No. 2933, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 863].

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947].

Une juridiction d'appel modéra la force probante de l'opposition au motif que les enfants avaient vécu longuement avec le parent ravisseur et sans contact avec le parent victime avant d'être entendus, observant également que les faits dénoncés par les enfants avaient par ailleurs été pris en compte par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle.

Allemagne
4 UF 223/98, Oberlandesgericht Düsseldorf, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 820] ;

Hongrie
Mezei v. Bíró 23.P.500023/98/5. (27. 03. 1998, Central District Court of Budapest; First Instance); 50.Pkf.23.732/1998/2. 16. 06. 1998., (Capital Court as Appellate Court) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HU 329] ;

Israël
Appl. App. Dist. Ct. 672/06, Supreme Court 15 October 2006 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 885] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
A.Q. v. J.Q., 12 December 2001, transcript, Outer House of the Court of Session (Scotland) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 415] ;

Espagne
Auto Audiencia Provincial Nº 133/2006 Pontevedra (Sección 1ª), Recurso de apelación Nº 473/2006 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 887] ;

Restitución de Menores 534/1997 AA [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 908].

Suisse
Le Tribunal fédéral suisse a estimé que l'opposition des enfants ne pouvait jamais être entièrement indépendante. Dès lors il convenait de distinguer selon que l'enfant avait ou non été manipulé. Voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Robinson v. Robinson, 983 F. Supp. 1339 (D. Colo. 1997), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 128].

Dans cette espèce, la District Court estima qu'il ne serait pas réaliste de prétendre qu'un parent aimant n'influence pas la préférence de l'enfant dans une certaine mesure de sorte que la question de savoir si l'un des parents a indûment influencé l'enfant ne devrait pas se poser.

Toutefois il a été décidé dans deux affaires que la preuve de l'influence parentale ne devrait pas empêcher l'audition d'un enfant. Voir :

Allemagne
2 BvR 1206/98, Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal Constitutional Court),[Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 233] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
Winters v. Cowen [2002] NZFLR 927, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 473].

Il se peut également que l'influence d'un parent n'ait que peu d'effet sur la position de l'enfant. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

La Cour d'appel ne rejeta pas la suggestion selon laquelle l'opinion de l'enfant avait été influencée ou que celui-ci avait été entraîné à penser d'une certaine façon du fait de son immersion dans une atmosphère hostile au père, mais n'y accorda que peu d'importance.

Dans une affaire israélienne, le juge estima que l'enfant avait subi un véritable lavage de cerveau de la part de la mère de sorte que son opinion ne devait pas être prise au sérieux. Toutefois le juge considéra que la nature extrême des réactions de l'enfant interrogé sur un possible retour (menace de suicide) était telle que son opinion ne pouvait être ignorée. Le juge estima dans ce cas que le retour exposerait l'enfant à un risque grave de danger. Voir :

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 834].

Frais

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.