CASE

Download full text FR

Case Name

TV c. MB, Droit de la famille 1222, 2012 QCCA 21

INCADAT reference

HC/E/CA 1158

Court

Country

CANADA

Name

Cour d'appel du Québec

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Marie-France Bich (J.C.A.), Jean Bouchard (J.C.A.), Richard Wagner (J.C.A)

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

CANADA - QUEBEC

Decision

Date

12 January 2012

Status

Subject to appeal

Grounds

Consent - Art. 13(1)(a) | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Interpretation of the Convention

Order

Appeal allowed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

1 13(1)(a) 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

1 13(1)(a) 13(1)(b)

Other provisions
Act respecting the Civil Aspects of International and Interprovincial Child Abduction
Authorities | Cases referred to
Droit de la famille - 2454, [1996] R.J.Q. 2509, p. 2526 (C.A.); RE E (Children) (FC), [2011] UKSC 27, paragr. 8; Friedrich v. Friedrich 78 F. 3d 1060 (6th Cir. 1996); [1996] 1 NZFLR 349 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ/ 246] p. 4; Caroline Harnois, « La Convention de La Haye du 25 octobre 1980 sur l'enlèvement international d'enfants : la nécessité d'agir de façon rapide et efficace », Développements récents en droit familial, Cowansville, Yvon Blais, 2008, p. 14, 18 et 19; Mario Provost, Droit de la famille québécois, CCH, section X.1 - L'enlèvement international et interprovincial d'enfants, p. 4,239, 4,242 et 4,243; Nigel Lowe, « International movement of children-law practice and procedures, Jordan Publishing Limited, 2004, p. 319; Droit de la famille - 09887, 2009 QCCS2021, paragr, 14 à 16 et 49 à 58; Droit de la famille - 092549, 2009 QCCA 1932 , paragr. 19 et 20; S. S.-C. c. G.C., 15 août 2003, 500-04-003270-035 (C.S.), paragr. 75.
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

General Issues
Limited Nature of the Exceptions
Consent
Establishing Consent
Grave Risk of Harm
Primary Carer Abductions

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The case concerned two children born in 2001 and 2005 to an American father and Canadian mother. The parents had cohabited for 10 years, until the father told the mother he had a mistress in June 2010. The parents' versions of subsequent events differed. According to the father, he had asked the mother, who was due to spend the summer with the children, to think about their situation.

According to the mother, he had demanded that she leave California finally. The mother and children left California as planned on 22 June 2010, but did not return when the summer ended. The mother had informed the father's mother, a week after her arrival in Quebec, that she would not return to the USA.

In September, counsel for the father applied for the children's return by means of a formal notice served on the mother. In March 2011, the action for child return was brought in Quebec. On 19 May 2011, the Superior Court, District of Frontenac, dismissed the return application. The father appealed against that ruling.

Ruling

Appeal allowed, return ordered.

Grounds

Consent - Art. 13(1)(a)

The mother asserted that the father had consented to the children's permanent removal. The Court of Appeal pointed out that the lower court had had to adjudicate between two diametrically-opposed versions of events.

It explained that, regarding the appraisal of evidence, the Court of Appeal could intervene only in the event of manifest and determining error, stressing, however, that as the exception is to be interpreted restrictively, "the regard normally to be paid to the lower court should be adapted according to these specific issues". It stated that the Act did not define consent, but that the case-law and legal authors recognized that consent needed to be "free and informed", but also "clear, positive and unequivocal".

Yet it could not be concluded that the father had consented, even impliedly, to the children's move to Quebec. The father had admittedly acted grossly and abusively in settling his mistress in the home on the very day of the mother and children's departure, but that did not imply his consent to a permanent relocation: immediately upon the announcement of the mother's decision to remain in Quebec, he had taken steps to be allowed to enter Canada (from which he was barred in principle owing to a criminal record), and as early as September, had responded to the mother's custody application by a formal notice to return the children.

He had never lost interest in the children's fate: to the extent of his ability, he had been "at all times concerned, proactive and sought to recover custody". The mother had left because she had no other option (she had no legal status in the USA, and worked in the family firm), then, once in Quebec, she had elected to stay, thereby converting the stay into a wrongful retention.

Admitting that returning the children to California was a difficult decision, the Court considered that it was nevertheless required: the Hague Convention of 1980 on child abduction was regarded as the best remedy against child abduction, and the exceptions affecting it were to be interpreted strictly.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The Court of Appeal held that the lower court had mistakenly concluded that the children's return to California would expose them to a grave risk. It considered that the court's concerns as to the children's diet were excessive since the mother herself was willing to leave the children in the father's custody for the whole summer. It added that application of the exceptions could not be based on tentative findings of fact.

It further stressed that the children's return to the State of their habitual residence necessarily exposed them to a risk of mental disturbance, connected with a further change in their living conditions, a risk shared by most if not all the children to whom the Act applied.

Accordingly, that risk could not constitute the harm or intolerable situation to which the exception refers. In addition, the exception connected with settlement in the new environment should be distinguished from the grave risk of harm. But the lower court had treated them as identical by taking into consideration that the children's balance would be upset by a return to California, whereas in fact the exception of settlement could not apply since less than a year had elapsed between the removal and initiation of the return application.

Interpretation of the Convention

The Court of Appeal considered that the lower court had been mistaken in extending to the Act respecting abduction the concept of the child's interest in the broad sense "because by doing so, it gave too extensive a scope to the exceptions provided for under the Act whereas a restrictive interpretation was mandated". Pointing out the terms of Article 1, the Court stressed that the starting point was that it was the court at the location of the children's residence which was best able to rule upon the terms of custody most conducive to their interest.

Accordingly, the "concept of the child's interests may not have the same scope as is applied on a daily basis by the Quebec courts in cases involving no diversity factor". Quoting Judge Chamberland and a judgment of the British Supreme Court, the Court stated that the child's best interest coincided with its return to the location of its habitual residence, except in cases where an exception applied. Thus, this narrower scope should be given to the concept of the child's interest when applying the statute implementing the Hague Convention of 1980 on child abduction.

It added that effective application of the Convention required close cooperation between the States parties: by acceding to the Hague Convention, Quebec had acknowledged that the State of habitual residence was best able to determine the rights of custody. By expressing the wish for an extension of the concept of the child's interests, the lower court "clearly ran counter to the Act's raison d'être, which had necessarily colored its reasoning".

Author of the summary: Aude Fiorini

INCADAT comment

See also the decision rendered by the Court of first instance: TV v. MB, Droit de la famille 111646, 2011 QCCS 2929 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 1023].

Limited Nature of the Exceptions

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Establishing Consent

Different standards have been applied when it comes to establishing the Article 13(1) a) exception based on consent.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In an early first instance decision it was held that ordinarily the clear and compelling evidence which was necessary would need to be in writing or at least evidenced by documentary material, see:

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37].

This strict view has not been repeated in later first instance English cases, see:

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 53];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 55].

In Re K. it was held that while consent must be real, positive and unequivocal, there could be circumstances in which a court could be satisfied that consent had been given, even though not in writing.  Moreover, there could also be cases where consent could be inferred from conduct.

Germany
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 491].

Convincing evidence is required to establish consent.

Ireland
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 817].

The Re K. approach was specifically endorsed by the Irish Supreme Court.

The Netherlands
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NL 318].

Consent need not be for a permanent stay.  The only issue is that there must be consent and that it has been proved convincingly.

South Africa
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

Consent could be express or tacit.

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841];

5P.380/2006 /blb; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 895];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung ) (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 896];

The Swiss Supreme Court has held that with regard to consent and acquiescence, the left behind parent must clearly agree, explicitly or tacitly, to a durable change in the residence of the child.  To this end the burden is on the abducting parent to show factual evidence which would lead to such a belief being plausible.

United States of America
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 808].

There must be a subjective assessment of what the applicant parent was actually contemplating. Consideration must also be given to the nature and scope of the consent.

Primary Carer Abductions

The issue of how to respond when a taking parent who is a primary carer threatens not to accompany a child back to the State of habitual residence if a return order is made, is a controversial one.

There are examples from many Contracting States where courts have taken a very strict approach so that, other than in exceptional situations, the Article 13(1)(b) exception has not been upheld where the non-return argument has been raised, see:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 764]

In this case, a non-return order was made since the facts were exceptional. There had been a genuine threat to the mother, which had put her quite obviously and rightfully in fear for her safety if she returned to Israel. The mother was taken to Israel on false pretences, sold to the Russian Mafia and re-sold to the father who forced her into prostitution. She was locked in, beaten by the father, raped and threatened. The mother was genuinely in a state of fear and could not be expected to return to Israel. It would be wholly inappropriate to send the child back without his mother to a father who had been buying and selling women and running a prostitution business.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 269]

However, in a more recent English Court of Appeal judgment, the C. v. C. approach has been refined:

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

In this case, it was ruled that a mother's refusal to return was capable of amounting to a defence because the refusal was not an act of unreasonableness, but came about as a result of an illness she was suffering from. It may be noted, however, that a return order was nevertheless still made. In this context reference may also be made to the decisions of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1068] and Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1147], in which it was accepted that the anxieties of a respondent mother about return, which were not based upon objective risk to her but nevertheless were of such intensity as to be likely, in the event of a return, to destabilise her parenting of the child to the point at which the child's situation would become intolerable, could in principle meet the threshold of the Article 13(1)(b) exception.

Germany
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Previously a much more liberal interpretation had been adopted:
Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 323]

Switzerland
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 1179]

New Zealand
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770]

United Kingdom - Scotland
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 26]

United States of America
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USs 97]

In other Contracting States, the approach taken with regard to non-return arguments has varied:

Australia
In Australia, early Convention case law exhibited a very strict approach adopted with regard to non-return arguments, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]
 
In State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 283], the Family Court of Australia at Melbourne did find the grave risk of harm exception to be established where the mother would not return, but in this case the mother had been denied entry into the United States of America, the child's State of habitual residence.

Following the judgment of the High Court of Australia (the highest court in the Australian judicial system) in the joint appeals DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 346, 347], greater attention has been focused on the post-return situation facing abducted children.

In the context of a primary-carer taking parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence see: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 544]. 

France
In French case law, a permissive approach to Article 13(1)(b) has been replaced with a much more restrictive interpretation. For examples of the initial approach, see:

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 498]

And for examples of the stricter interpretation, see:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
In Israeli case law there are contrasting examples of the judicial response to non-return arguments:
 
Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 832]

in contrast with:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 833]

Poland
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 700]

The Supreme Court noted that it would not be in the child's best interests if she were deprived of her mother's care, were the latter to choose to remain in Poland. However, it equally affirmed that if the child were to stay in Poland it would not be in her interests to be deprived of the care of her father. For these reasons, the Court concluded that it could not be assumed that ordering the return of the child would place her in an intolerable situation.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 701]

The Supreme Court specified that the frequently used argument of the child's potential separation from the taking parent, did not, in principle, justify the application of the exception. It held that where there were no objective obstacles to the return of a taking parent, then it could be assumed that the taking parent considered his own interest to be more important than those of the child.

The Court added that a taking parent's fear of being held criminally liable was not an objective obstacle to return, as the taking parent should have been aware of the consequences of his actions. The situation with regard to infants was however more complicated. The Court held that the special bond between mother and baby only made their separation possible in exceptional cases, and this was so even if there were no objective obstacles to the mother's return to the State of habitual residence. The Court held that where the mother of an infant refused to return, whatever the reason, then the return order should be refused on the basis of Article 13(1)(b). On the facts, return was ordered.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UY 1185]

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
There are decisions of the ECrtHR which have endorsed a strict approach with regard to the compatibility of Hague Convention exceptions and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Some of these cases have considered arguments relevant to the issue of grave risk of harm, including where an abductor has indicated an unwillingness to accompany the returning child, see:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1169]

In this case, the ECrtHR upheld a challenge by the left-behind father that the refusal of the Turkish courts to return his child led to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The ECrtHR stated that whilst very young age was a criterion to be taken into account to determine the child's interest in an abduction case, it could not be considered by itself a sufficient ground, in relation to the requirements of the Hague Convention, to justify dismissal of a return application.

Recourse has been had to expert evidence to assist in ascertaining the potential consequences of the child being separated from the taking parent

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1177]

However, it must equally be noted that since the Grand Chamber ruling in Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, there are examples of a less strict approach being followed. The latter ruling had emphasised the best interests of the individual abducted child in the context of an application for return and the ascertainment of whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation as well as a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, see:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]; and Grand Chamber ruling X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1171]

In this case, a majority found that the return of a child to the United States of America would lead to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The decision-making process of the Belgian Appellate Court as regards Article 13(1)(b) was held not to have met the procedural requirements inherent in Article 8 of the ECHR. The two dissenting judges noted, however, that the danger referred to in Article 13 should not consist only of the separation of the child from the taking parent.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Faits

L'affaire concernait deux enfants nées en 2001 et 2005 de père américain et de mère canadienne. Les parents avaient fait vie commune pendant 10 ans, jusqu'à ce que le père annonce à la mère qu'il avait une maîtresse en juin 2010. La version des parents différait quant à la suite des évènements. Selon le père il avait demandé à la mère, qui devait passer l'été avec les enfants, de réfléchir à leur situation.

Selon la mère, il l'avait mise en demeure de quitter définitivement la Californie. La mère et les enfants quittèrent comme prévu la Californie le 22 juin 2010 mais ne rentrèrent pas à la fin de l'été. La mère avait informé la mère du père une semaine après son arrivée au Québec qu'elle ne reviendrait pas aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique.

En septembre, l'avocat du père demanda le retour des enfants sous la forme d'une mise en demeure de la mère. En mars 2011, l'action en retour d'enfant fut intentée au Québec.Le 19 mai 2011, la Cour supérieure du district de Frontenac rejeta la demande de retour. Le père forma appel de cette décision.

Dispositif

Recours accueilli, retour ordonné.

Motifs

Consentement - art. 13(1)(a)


La mère faisait valoir que le père avait consenti au déplacement permanent des enfants. La Cour d'appel observa que le juge de première instance avait dû trancher entre deux versions des faits diamétralement opposées.

Elle expliqua que, s'agissant d'une appréciation des éléments de preuve, la Cour d'appel ne pouvait intervenir qu'en cas d'erreur manifeste et déterminante, soulignant toutefois que comme l'exception doit être interprétée restrictivement, « la déférence normalement due au juge de première instance doit être modulée en fonction de cette problématique particulière ». Elle indiqua que la Loi ne définissait pas la notion de consentement mais que jurisprudence et doctrine reconnaissaient que le consentement doit être donné « de manière libre et éclairée » mais aussi « claire, positive et sans équivoque ».

Or on ne pouvait conclure que le père avait donné son consentement, même implicite, au déménagement des enfants au Québec. Certes le père avait agi de manière odieuse et infamante en installant sa maitresse à la maison le jour même du départ de la mère et des enfants mais cela ne signifiait pas qu'il avait consenti à un déplacement permanent: il avait dès l'annonce de l'intention de la mère de rester au Québec amorcé des démarches pour pouvoir entrer au Canada (ce qui lui était en principe refusé étant donné un casier judiciaire) et avait dès septembre répondu à la demande de garde de la mère par une mise en demeure de renvoyer les enfants.

Il ne s'était jamais désintéressé du sort des enfants: dans la mesure de ses moyens il avait été « en tout temps pertinent, proactif et cherché à recouvrer la garde ». La mère était partie car elle n'avait pas le choix (elle n'avait aucun statut légal aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique et travaillait dans l'entreprise familiale), puis, une fois au Québec, elle avait décidé de rester, transformant ainsi le séjour en rétention illégale.

Reconnaissant que retourner les enfants en Californie était une décision difficile à prendre, la Cour estima qu'elle s'imposait néanmoins: la Convention de la Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants était considérée comme le meilleur moyen de contrer les enlèvements d'enfants et ses exceptions étaient d'interprétation stricte.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)


La Cour d'appel considéra que le premier juge avait commis une erreur en concluant que le retour des enfants en Californie les exposerait à un risque grave. Elle estima que les inquiétudes du juge quant au régime alimentaire des enfants étaient exagérées étant donné que la mère elle-même était disposée à laisser au père la garde des enfants pendant tout l'été. Elle ajouta que l'application des exceptions ne pouvait par ailleurs se fonder sur des conclusions factuelles hésitantes.

Elle souligna encore que le retour des enfants dans l'Etat de leur résidence habituelle les exposait nécessairement à un risque de trouble psychologique, lié à un nouveau changement dans leurs conditions de vie, risque commun à la plupart sinon tous les enfants visés par la Loi. Dès lors ce risque ne pouvait caractériser l'état de danger ni la situation intolérable visés par l'exception.

En outre, il convenait de distinguer l'exception liée à l'intégration dans le nouveau milieu du risque grave de danger. Or le premier juge avait confondu les deux en prenant en considération que l'équilibre des enfants serait brisé par un retour en Californie, alors d'ailleurs que l'exception de l'intégration ne pouvait s'appliquer puisqu'un an ne s'était pas écoulé entre le déplacement et l'introduction de la demande de retour.

Interprétation de la Convention


La Cour d'appel estima que le premier juge avait commis une erreur en important dans la Loi sur l'enlèvement la notion d'intérêt de l'enfant au sens large « car, ce faisant, elle se trouvait à donner une portée trop étendue aux exceptions prévues par la Loi alors qu'une interprétation restrictive était de mise ». Rappelant les termes de l'article 1, la Cour souligna que le point de départ était que c'est le tribunal du lieu de résidence des enfants qui est le mieux placé pour statuer sur les modalités de garde qui sont dans son meilleur intérêt.

Dès lors la « notion de l'intérêt de l'enfant ne saurait avoir la même portée que celle appliquée quotidiennement par les tribunaux québécois dans les cas où est absent tout élément d'extranéité ». Citant le juge Chamberland ainsi qu'un arrêt de la Cour suprême britannique, la Cour indiqua que le meilleur intérêt de l'enfant coïncidait avec son retour au lieu de sa résidence habituelle, sauf dans les cas où une des exceptions s'appliquait. C'était donc cette portée plus étroite qu'il fallait donner à la notion de l'intérêt de l'enfant lorsqu'on appliquait la loi mettant en œuvre la Convention de la Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants.

Elle ajouta que l'application efficace de la Convention de la Haye passait par une étroite coopération entre les Etats signataires: en adhérant à la Convention de la Haye, le Québec avait reconnu que l'Etat de la résidence habituelle était le mieux placé pour déterminer les droits de garde. En émettant le souhait d'un élargissement de la notion d'intérêt de l'enfant, le premier juge allait « clairement à l'encontre de la raison d'être de la Loi, ce qui avait nécessairement eu pour effet de teinter son raisonnement ».

Auteur du résumé : Aude Fiorini

Commentaire INCADAT

L'arrêt rendu en première instance dans cette affaire est disponible sur INCADAT: TV c. MB, Droit de la famille 111646, 2011 QCCS 2929 [Référence INCADAT HC/E/CA 1023].

Nature limitée des exceptions

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Établissement du consentement

Des exigences différentes ont été appliquées en matière d'établissement d'une exception de l'article 13(1) a) pour consentement.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans une décision de première instance ancienne, il fut considéré qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve claire et impérieuse et qu'en général cette preuve devait être écrite ou en tout cas soutenue par des éléments de preuve écrits. Voir :

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @37@].

Cette approche restrictive n'a pas été maintenue dans des décisions de première instance plus récentes au Royaume-Uni. Voir :

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @53@];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @55@].

Dans Re K. il fut décidé que si le consentement devait être réel, positif and non équivoque, il y avait des situations dans lesquelles le juge pouvait se satisfaire de preuves non écrites du consentement, et qu'il se pouvait même que le consentement fût déduit du comportement.

Allemagne
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE @491@].

Il fut décidé qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve convaincante du consentement.

Irlande
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @817@].

La Cour suprême irlandaise repris expressément les termes de Re K.

Pays-Bas
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL @318@].

Le consentement peut ne pas porter sur un séjour permanent, pourvu que le consentement à un séjour au moins temporaire soit établi de manière convaincante.

Afrique du Sud
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @900@].

Le consentement pouvait être exprès ou tacite.

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@] ;

5P.380/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @895@];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @896@].

Le Tribunal fédéral suisse estima qu'il y avait consentement et acquiescement du parent victime si celui-ci avait accepté, expressément ou implicitement, un changement durable de la résidence de l'enfant. Il appartenait au parent ravisseur d'apporter des éléments de preuve factuels rendant plausible qu'il avait pu croire à ce consentement.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @808@].

Il convenait de rechercher ce que le parent victime avait en tête et également de prendre en compte la nature et l'étendue du consentement.

Enlèvements par le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant

La question de la position à adopter dans les situations où le parent ravisseur est le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, et qu'il menace de ne pas rentrer avec l'enfant dans l'État de résidence habituelle si une ordonnance de retour est rendue, est controversée.

De nombreux États contractants ont adopté une position très stricte au terme de laquelle le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b) n'a été retenu que dans des circonstances exceptionnelles quand l'argument tendant au non-retour de l'enfant était invoqué. Voir :

Autriche
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

Dans cette affaire, les circonstances exceptionnelles ont résulté en une ordonnance de non-retour. La mère faisait face à une menace véritable qui lui faisait craindre légitimement pour sa sécurité si elle retournait en Israël. Elle avait été emmenée en Israël sous un faux prétexte, y avait été vendue à la mafia russe puis revendue au père, qui l'avait forcée à se prostituer. Elle avait alors été enfermée, battue par le père, violée et menacée. La mère était dans un réel état de peur, on ne pouvait attendre d'elle qu'elle retourne en Israël. Il aurait été complètement inapproprié de renvoyer l'enfant sans sa mère vers un père qui avait acheté et vendu des femmes, et dirigé des activités de prostitution.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

Toutefois, dans un jugement plus récent rendu par une Cour d'appel anglaise, la position adoptée en 1989 dans l'affaire C. v. C. fut précisée. Voir :

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Dans cette affaire, il fut décidé que le refus de la mère de retourner dans l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle était susceptible de déclencher le jeu de l'exception en ce qu'il n'était pas imputable à un comportement excessif mais à une maladie dont elle souffrait. Il convient de noter qu'une ordonnance de retour fut malgré tout rendue. On peut également mentionner à ce sujet les décisions de la Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni dans Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] et Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. Dans cette dernière affaire, il fut accepté que les angoisses d'une mère concernant son retour satisfaisaient le niveau de risque requis à l'article 13(1)(b) et justifiaient le jeu de cette exception quoiqu'elles n'étaient pas fondées sur un risque objectif. L'ampleur de ces angoisses était telle qu'elles lui auraient probablement causé des difficultés à assumer normalement son rôle de parent en cas de retour, au point de rendre la situation de l'enfant intolérable.

Allemagne
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Auparavant, une position beaucoup plus libérale avait été adoptée :

Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suisse
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Etats-Unis d'Amérique
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position adoptée quant aux arguments tendant au non-retour de l'enfant a varié :

Australie
En Australie, la jurisprudence ancienne témoigne d'une position initialement très stricte. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

Dans l'affaire State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], le Tribunal de Melbourne avait estimé qu'il y avait bien un risque grave de danger alors que la mère refusait de rentrer avec l'enfant. En l'espèce, toutefois, la mère ne pouvait pas retourner aux États-Unis, État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant, car les autorités de ce pays lui refusaient l'entrée sur le territoire.

Plus récemment, suite à la décision de la Cour suprême qui avait été saisie des appels joints dans D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], les tribunaux ont accordé une attention plus particulière à la situation à laquelle l'enfant allait devoir faire face après son retour.

Pour une illustration de ce phénomène dans une affaire où le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant refusait de rentrer avec lui dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle, voir : Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

France
Dans la jurisprudence française, l'interprétation permissive de l'article 13(1)(b) qui prévalait initialement a été remplacée par une interprétation beaucoup plus stricte. Pour une illustration de l'interprétation permissive initiale. Voir :

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

et pour une illustration de l'interprétation plus stricte, voir :

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israël
Il existe dans la jurisprudence israélienne des exemples contrastés du traitement des exceptions au retour :

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]  contrastant avec :

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Pologne
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Cour Suprême nota qu'il ne serait pas conforme à l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant de la priver des soins de sa mère, si celle-ci décidait de rester en Pologne. La Cour affirma cependant que si l'enfant devait rester en Pologne, il serait tout autant contraire à son intérêt d'être privée des soins de son père. Tenant compte de ces considérations, la Cour conclut qu'il ne pouvait pas être présumé qu'ordonner le retour de l'enfant la placerait dans une situation intolérable.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Cour suprême précisa que l'argument fréquemment avancé de la potentielle séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur ne justifiait pas, en principe, le jeu de l'exception. La Cour jugea qu'en l'absence d'obstacles objectifs au retour du parent ravisseur, on pouvait présumer que celui-ci accordait plus de valeur à ses propres intérêts qu'à ceux de l'enfant.

La Cour ajouta que la crainte pour le parent ravisseur de voir sa responsabilité pénale engagée ne constituait pas un obstacle objectif au retour, puisque celui-ci aurait dû avoir conscience des conséquences de ses actions. La situation était cependant plus compliquée s'agissant des nourrissons. La Cour estima que le lien spécial unissant la mère et le nourrisson ne rendait la séparation possible qu'en cas exceptionnel, et ce même en l'absence d'obstacle objectif au retour de la mère dans l'État de résidence habituelle. La Cour jugea que lorsque la mère d'un nourrisson refusait de revenir avec lui, quelles qu'en soient les raisons, alors le retour devait être refusé sur la base de l'article 13(1)(b). D'après les faits de l'espèce, le retour avait été ordonné.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
Il existe des décisions de la CourEDH adoptant une position stricte relativement à la compatibilité des exceptions de la Convention de La Haye avec la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH). Dans certaines de ces affaires, des arguments relatifs à l'exception pour risque grave étaient considérés, y compris lorsque le parent ravisseur indiquait son refus d'accompagner le retour de l'enfant. Voir :

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH confirma un recours du père à qui l'enfant avait été enlevé selon lequel les juridictions turques avaient commis une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH en refusant d'ordonner le retour de son enfant. La CourEDH jugea que, bien que le très jeune âge d'un enfant soit un critère à prendre en compte dans la détermination de son intérêt, cela ne constituait pas en soi, selon les exigences de la Convention de La Haye, un motif suffisant pour justifier le rejet d'une demande de retour.

Il a parfois été fait recours à des témoignages d'expert afin de faciliter l'évaluation des conséquences potentielles de la séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur. Voir :

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Cependant, il faut également noter que, depuis la décision de la Grande Chambre dans l'affaire Neulinger et Shuruk c Suisse, il est des exemples où une approche moins stricte est suivie. Dans le contexte d'une demande de retour, ce dernier jugement avait placé l'accent sur l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant enlevé et sur le fait de vérifier que les autorités nationales compétentes avaient conduit un examen détaillé de la situation familiale dans son ensemble ainsi qu'une appréciation équilibrée et raisonnable de tous les intérêts en jeu. Voir :

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; et décision de la Grand Chamber X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH estima à la majorité que le retour d'un enfant aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique entrainerait une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH. Il fut jugé que le processus de prise de décision de la Cour d'appel belge, en ce qui concerne l'article 13(1)(b), n'avait pas satisfait aux exigences procédurales posées par l'article 8 de la CEDH. Les deux juges dissidents notèrent cependant que le danger visé par l'article 13 ne saurait résulter de la seule séparation de l'enfant et du parent ravisseur.

(Auteur: Peter McEleavy, avril 2013)