CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Re R (A Child) [2014] EWHC 2802 (Fam)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/UKe 1289

Court

Country

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Name

Family Division of the High Court

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Finnerty J.

States involved

Requesting State

JAPAN

Requested State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Decision

Date

22 July 2014

Status

Final

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3 | Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a) | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

Order

Return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1) a) 13(1) b) 13(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(1) a) 13(1) b) 13(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Re R Abduction Habitual Residence [2004] 1FLR 216; Re HK Children [2011] EWCA Civ.1100; Re S (A Minor: Child Abduction) [1992] 1FLR 548; Re H & Ors (Minors Abduction (Acquiescence)) [1998] AC 72; Re S (Minors Abduction (Acquiescence)) [1994] 1 FLR 819; Re E (Children Abduction Custody Appeal) [2011] 2 FLR 578.

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Habitual Residence
Time Limited Moves

Exceptions to Return

Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | ES

Facts

The proceedings related to a Japanese child aged 7 who was born to Japanese parents. The parents married in September 2005 and separated in April 2013, whereupon they reached an agreement through mediation with the Family Court in Tokyo. This was entered onto the court record and provided that the mother would have primary care, the father regular overnight contact.

No consensus was reached about the removal of the child from Japan. Following further mediation, the parents had a disagreement about the mother's wish to take the child to the United Kingdom for a year whilst she took up an academic post.

In late 2013 / early 2014, the father advised the British Embassy in Japan of his opposition to the mother securing a visa for the child. On 31 March 2014, the mother applied to the Tokyo Family Court for a variation of the mediation agreement in order to take the child to Britain for one year.

On the same day, the mother took the child to the United Kingdom. The child arrived without an entry visa. The father was contacted by a UK official as to whether he permitted the child to enter the country. The father gave his consent. He subsequently submitted that this was for a four week visit (the mother had purchased return tickets dated 28 April).

On 1 May, the father filed a return petition with the Japanese and English central authorities. On 20 May, the mother sent an email to the father seeking his consent for the child to remain in the United Kingdom during her stay. On 6 June 2014, the mother issued a second set of proceedings in the Tokyo Family Court seeking sole custody of the child.

Ruling

Retention wrongful and return ordered; none of the exceptions had been established.

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3


The High Court rejected the mother's submission that by the time the return petition was issued the child had become habitually resident in the United Kingdom.

In this it referred, inter alia, to the mother's issuing of substantive proceedings in Japan and the fact the child had entered the United Kingdom under a tourist visa and was entitled to stay for a period of six months.

Rights of Custody - Art. 3


The Court held that as the parents remained married they had joint custody of the child.

Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a)


The Court found that the evidence demonstrated unequivocally that the father never acquiesced in the child remaining in the United Kingdom for longer than one month.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)


The Court held that the issues raised by the mother were more properly described as the sort of welfare issues and concerns which may fall to be considered by the Tokyo Family Court concerned with determining the future of the child.

Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)


The Court noted that the child did not object to return to Japan, but wanted very much to remain in the United Kingdom temporarily whilst the mother undertook research.

Author of the summary: Peter McEleavy

INCADAT comment

Time Limited Moves

Where a move abroad is time limited, even if it is for an extended period of time, there has been acceptance in certain Contracting States that the existing habitual residence can be maintained throughout, see:

Denmark
Ø.L.K., 5. April 2002, 16. afdeling, B-409-02 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DK 520];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. (Abduction: Habitual Residence: Consent) [2000] 2 FLR 294; [2000] 3 FCR 412 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 478];

United States of America
Morris v. Morris, 55 F. Supp. 2d 1156 (D. Colo., Aug. 30, 1999) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 306];

Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 301].

However, where a move was to endure for two years the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit found that a change of habitual residence occurred shortly after the move, see:

Whiting v. Krassner 391 F.3d 540 (3rd Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/US 778].

In an English first instance decision it was held that a child had acquired a habitual residence in Germany after five months even though the family had only moved there for a six month secondment, see:

Re R. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [2003] EWHC 1968 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 580].

The Court of Appeal of China (Hong Kong SAR) found that a 21 month move led to a change in habitual residence:

B.L.W. v. B.W.L. [2007] 2 HKLRD 193, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 975].

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Hechos

La causa involucró a un menor japonés de siete años de edad, hijo de padres japoneses. Los padres contrajeron matrimonio en septiembre de 2005 y se separaron en abril de 2013. Llegaron a un acuerdo en una audiencia de mediación que se llevó a cabo ante un tribunal con competencia en materia de familia de Tokio.

El acuerdo quedó asentado en los registros del juzgado y establecía que el cuidado primordial del menor estaría a cargo de la madre y que el menor pasaría una noche con su padre a intervalos periódicos. No se llegó a ningún acuerdo respecto del traslado del menor a Japón. Tras audiencias de mediación que se realizaron con posterioridad, los padres no pudieron llegar a un acuerdo con respecto al deseo de la madre de llevarse al menor al Reino Unido durante un año, que era el período de tiempo en que ella ejercería un cargo académico en dicho país.

A fines de 2013 y principios de 2014, el padre informó en la embajada británica con sede en Japón que estaba en desacuerdo con que la madre tramitara una visa para el menor. El 31 de marzo de 2014, la madre solicitó al tribunal con competencia en materia de familia de Tokio que se realizara una modificación en el acuerdo al que se había llegado en la audiencia de mediación con respecto al traslado del menor al Reino Unido durante un año.

Ese mismo día, la madre se llevó al menor al Reino Unido. El menor llegó al país sin visa de ingreso. Un funcionario del Reino Unido se contactó con el padre para saber si había autorizado la entrada del menor al país. El padre dio su consentimiento, pero posteriormente alegó que solo con respecto a una visita de cuatro semanas (la madre había comprado los pasajes aéreos de regreso con fecha para el 28 de abril).

El 1 de mayo, el padre presentó una solicitud de restitución ante las Autoridades Centrales de Japón y el Reino Unido. El 20 de mayo, la madre le envió un correo electrónico al padre con el fin de que autorizara al menor a permanecer en el Reino Unido durante la estadía de la madre. El 6 de junio de 2014, la madre inició un procedimiento ante el tribunal con competencia en materia de familia en Tokio con el fin de obtener la custodia exclusiva del menor.

Fallo

Retención ilícita y restitución ordenada; no se había configurado ninguna de las excepciones del Convenio.

Fundamentos

Residencia habitual - art. 3


El tribunal de primera instancia (High Court) desestimó el argumento de la madre de que el menor se había convertido en residente habitual del Reino Unido para el momento en que se presentó la solicitud de restitución.

El argumento fue desestimado, entre otros motivos, por el hecho de que la madre había iniciado un procedimiento sobre el fondo de la cuestión en Japón y el niño había ingresado al Reino Unido con una visa de turista y solo tenía derecho a permanecer en el país durante un período de seis meses.

Derechos de custodia - art. 3


El tribunal sostuvo que, como el matrimonio de los padres aún tenía vigencia, ambos compartían la custodia del menor.

Aceptación posterior ? art. 13(1)(a)
El tribunal concluyó que las pruebas efectivamente demostraban que el padre nunca había estado de acuerdo con que el menor permaneciera en el Reino Unido durante más de un mes.

Aceptación posterior - art. 13(1)(a)

-

Grave riesgo - art. 13(1)(b)


El tribunal sostuvo que las cuestiones planteadas por la madre eran cuestiones que, básicamente, se relacionaban con el bienestar del menor y que correspondía fueran consideradas por el tribunal con competencia en materia de familia de Tokio, cuyo objetivo era determinar el futuro del menor.

Objeciones del niño a la restitución - art. 13(2)


El tribunal observó que el menor no tenía objeciones con respecto a la restitución a Japón pero realmente quería permanecer en el Reino Unido de forma temporal durante el período en que la madre llevara a cabo su investigación.

Autor del resumen : Peter McEleavy

Comentario INCADAT

Instalación en el extranjero por un tiempo limitado

Cuando la instalación en el extranjero es por un tiempo limitado, aunque sea por un período extenso, ciertos Estados contratantes han aceptado que la residencia habitual anterior pueda conservarse durante ese período. Véase:


Dinamarca
Ø.L.K., 5. Abril 2002, 16. afdeling, B-409-02 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DK 520];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re H. (Abduction: Habitual Residence: Consent) [2000] 2 FLR 294; [2000] 3 FCR 412 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 478];

Estados Unidos de América
Morris v. Morris, 55 F. Supp. 2d 1156 (D. Colo., Aug. 30, 1999) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 306];

Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 301].

No obstante, en un caso en que una mudanza había de extenderse por dos años, el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones para el Tercer Circuito concluyó que se había producido un cambio de residencia habitual poco después de la mudanza. Véase:

Whiting v. Krassner, 391 F.3d 540 (3rd Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 778].

En un fallo inglés de primera instancia, se sostuvo que un menor había adquirido residencia habitual en Alemania luego de cinco meses si bien la familia se había mudado allí sólo por un contrato temporal de seis meses. Véase:

Re R. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [2003] EWHC 1968 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 580].

El Tribunal de Apelaciones de China (RAE de Hong Kong) consideró que una mudanza por un período de meses había prducido el cambio de residencia habitual:

B.L.W. v. B.W.L. [2007] 2 HKLRD 193, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HK 975].

Naturaleza y tenor de la oposición

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

La máxima instancia de Australia (la High Court) adoptó una interpretación literal del término "objeción". Sin embargo, fue posteriormente revocada por una reforma legislativa. Véase:

Art. 111B(1B) de la Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975) incorporada por la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000).

El artículo 13(2), incorporado al derecho australiano mediante la reg. 16(3) de las Regulaciones de Derecho de Familia (Sustracción de Menores) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989) establece en la actualidad no solo que el menor debe oponerse a la restitución, sino que la objeción debe demostrar un sentimiento fuerte más allá de la mera expresión de una preferencia o de deseos comunes.

Véanse, por ejemplo:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 904].

La cuestión acerca de si un menor debe plantear una objeción expresamente al Estado de residencia habitual no ha sido resuelta. Véase:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 8/10/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 549].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 546].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Canadá
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 1028].

Para probar que un menor se opone a la restitución, ha de demostrarse que el menor "expresó un fuerte desacuerdo a regresar al pais de su residencia habitual. Su oposición ha de ser categórica. No puede determinarse simplemente pesando las ventajas y desventajas de los dos Estados en cuestión, como en el caso del análisis de su interes superior. Debe tratarse de algo más fuerte que de una mera expresión de preferencia".


Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En el caso Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 87], el Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la restitución a la que un menor se opone debe ser una restitución inmediata al país del que fue ilícitamente sustraído. El artículo 13 no contiene disposición alguna que permita considerar si el menor se opone a la restitución en ciertas circunstancias.

En Re M. (A Minor)(Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 56], se aceptó, sin embargo, que una objeción a la vida con el progenitor solicitante puede distinguirse de una objeción a la vida en el país de origen previo.

En Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], Lord Justice Ward plantea una serie de preguntas a fin de ayudar a determinar si era adecuado tomar en cuenta las objeciones de un menor.

Estas preguntas fueron respaldadas por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el marco del caso Re M. (A Child)(Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901].

Para comentarios académicos ver: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

Francia
Las objeciones basadas exclusivamente en una preferencia por la vida en Francia o la vida con el padre sustractor no fueron admitidas, ver:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. c. F. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 63].

Reino Unido - Escocia
En el caso Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs79], se adoptó una interpretación amplia. La Cámara Interna (Inner House) aceptó que una fuerte preferencia por permanecer con el padre sustractor y por la vida en Escocia implicaba una objeción a la restitución a los Estados Unidos de América.

En W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 805], la Cámara Interna, que aceptó el criterio inicial de Re T. [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], sostuvo que las objeciones relativas a cuestiones de bienestar debían ser tratadas exclusivamente por las autoridades del Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

En el posterior caso de primera instancia: M, Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith destacó la división en la jurisprudencia de apelación y decidió seguir la línea de autoridad previa ejemplificada en Urness v. Minto.  Rechazó expresamente los criterios iniciales de Re T.

La jueza dejó asentado en su sentencia que habría habido un intento de impugnar la sentencia de la Cámara Interna en W. v. W. ante la Cámara de los Lores pero que el caso se había resuelto en forma amigable.

Más recientemente, se ha seguido un enfoque más estricto en cuanto a las objeciones, ver: C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]; ratificado en instancia de apelación: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996].

Suiza
El máximo tribunal suizo ha resaltado la importancia de que los menores sean capaces de distinguir entre las cuestiones vinculadas a la custodia y las cuestiones vinculadas a la restitución, ver:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 894].

La mera preferencia por la vida en el Estado de refugio, aun razonada, no satisfará los términos del Artículo 13(2):

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986].

Para comentarios académicos generales, ver: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia, 2008).