CASE

Case Name

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber

INCADAT reference

HC/E/CH 1323

Court

Name

European Court of Human Rights

Level

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

Judge(s)
Jean-Paul Costa (President); Nicolas Bratza, Peer Lorenzen, Françoise Tulkens, Josep Casadevall, Ireneu Cabral Barreto, Corneliu Bîrsan, Boštjan M. Zupan?i?, Elisabet Fura, Egbert Myjer, Danut? Jo?ien?, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Päivi Hirvelä, Giorgio Malinverni, András Sajó, Nona Tsotsoria, Zdravka Kalaydjieva (Judges); Vincent Berger (Jurisconsult)

States involved

Requesting State

ISRAEL

Requested State

SWITZERLAND

Decision

Date

6 July 2010

Status

Final

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) | Procedural Matters

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(1)(b)

Other provisions
Articles 6(1) and 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights
Authorities | Cases referred to
Court of Cassation, First Civil Division, 14 June 2005, appeal no. 04-16942 [27 December 1996] Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 Re D (a child), [2006] UKHL 51 C. v. C. (England and Wales Court of Appeal; [1989] 1 WLR 654 José García Resina and Muriel Ghislaine Henriette Resina, [1991] FamCA 33 Foxman v. Foxman, Israeli Supreme Court, 1992 Re F [1995] 3 WLR 339 Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133, (2nd Cir., 2000) K. and T. v. Finland [GC], no. 25702/94, § 141, ECHR 2001 VII Maire v. Portugal, no. 48206/99, § 68, ECHR 2003 VII Waite and Kennedy v. Germany [GC], no. 26083/94, § 54, ECHR 1999 I, Korbely v. Hungary [GC], no. 9174/02, § 72, ECHR 2008 Bianchi v. Switzerland (no. 7548/04, § 77, 22 June 2006) Maumousseau and Washington v. France (no. 39388/05, ECHR 2007 XIII) Golder v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1975, § 29, Series A no. 18; Streletz, Kessler and Krenz v. Germany [GC], nos. 34044/96, 35532/97 and 44801/98, § 90, ECHR 2001-II; Al-Adsani v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 35763/97, § 55, ECHR 2001-XI) Iglesias Gil and A.U.I. v. Spain, no. 56673/00, § 51, ECHR 2003-V, Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, no. 31679/96, § 95, ECHR 2000-I Loizidou v. Turkey 23 March 1995, § 93, Series A no. 310 Carlson v. Switzerland, no. 49492/06, § 76, ECHR 2008 Gnahoré v. France, no. 40031/98, § 59, ECHR 2000 IX Sahin v. Germany [GC], no. 30943/96, § 66, ECHR 2003 VIII Haase v. Germany, no. 11057/02, § 89, ECHR 2004 III, Kutzner v. Germany, no. 46544/99, § 58, ECHR 2002 I Elsholz v. Germany [GC], no. 25735/94, § 50, ECHR 2000 VIII, Maršálek v. the Czech Republic, no. 8153/04, § 71, 4 April 2006 Hokkanen v. Finland, 23 September 1994, § 55, Series A no. 299 A, Eskinazi and Chelouche v. Turkey (dec.), no. 14600/05, ECHR 2005 XIII Tiemann v. France and Germany (dec.), nos. 47457/99 and 47458/99, ECHR 2000 IV Sylvester v. Austria, nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, 24 April 2003 Maslov v. Austria [GC], no. 1638/03, § 91, ECHR 2008 Koons v. Italy, no. 68183/01, §§ 51 et seq., 30 September 2008 Emre v. Switzerland, no. 42034/04, § 68, 22 May 2008 Üner v. the Netherlands [GC], no. 46410/99, § 57, ECHR 2006 XII Paradis and Others v Germany (dec.), no. 4783/03, 15 May 2003 Zimmermann and Steiner v. Switzerland, 13 July 1983, § 36, Series A no. 66, Hertel v. Switzerland, 25 August 1998, § 63, Reports 1998 VI Bottazzi v. Italy [GC], no. 34884/97, § 30, ECHR 1999 V Linnekogel v. Switzerland, no. 43874/98, § 49, 1 March 2005.

INCADAT comment

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR)
European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Primary Carer Abductions

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to a child born in Israel in 2003 to a Swiss mother and an Israeli father. The parents had married in Israel in 2001. After the birth, the mother alleged that the father had joined a radical, ultra-orthodox Jewish sect. Given her fears that the father would take the child abroad to a community of the sect, the mother sought and obtained in June 2004 an order prohibiting the removal of the child from the jurisdiction. The order was to endure throughout the minority of the child. The parents divorced in February 2005. The pre-existing provisional custody order of 27 June 2004 was not amended. This recognized both parents as guardians, but the mother was given custody, the father access.

On 20 March 2005 an arrest warrant was issued against the father for non-payment of maintenance. On 27 March the mother failed in an attempt to have the non-removal order lifted. On 24 June 2005 the mother secretly took the child to Switzerland. Their location was discovered in May 2006. On 30 May 2006 the family Court in Tel Aviv issued an order confirming the removal to have been wrongful. On 8 June 2006 the father filed his return petition.

On 29 August 2006 the justice of the peace for the district of Lausanne (Switzerland) declined to order the return of the child, finding the grave risk of harm exception to have been established. On 27 May 2007 the cantonal court in Vaud (Switzerland) dismissed the father's appeal, again relying on Article 13(1)(b) of the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention. On 16 August 2007 the Swiss Federal Court ordered the return of the child, finding no basis for a grave risk of harm: 5A_285/2007/frs, Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955].

On 26 September 2007 mother and child petitioned the European Court of Human Rights. On 27 September 2007 the President of the Chamber indicated to the Swiss Government, on the basis of Article 39 of the Rules of the Court (Interim Measures), not to proceed with the return of the child. On 1 October the father withdrew his application for enforcement.

On 8 January 2009, by a 4:3 majority, the European Court on Human Rights ruled that there had not been a breach of the mother and child's right to family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR): Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1001]. On 31 March 2009 the applicants requested that the case be referred to the Grand Chamber. This was granted by the panel of the Grand Chamber on 5 June 2009 and the application of the interim measures was confirmed.

Ruling

The European Court of Human Rights held by sixteen votes to one that, in the event of the enforcement of the return order, there would be a violation of the mother and child's right to family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3


Mother and child argued that the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention was not implicated, as the removal from Israel had not been wrongful.

The European Court of Human Rights, which reviewed a selection of foreign case law on the meaning of "rights of custody" for the purposes of the 1980 Hague Convention, agreed with the Chamber and the three domestic courts which had reviewed the case, that the removal had indeed been wrongful. In this it noted that the Israeli institution of "guardianship" incorporated the right to determine the child's place of residence. This right had been breached because it was to be exercised jointly by both parents.

Moreover, the mother had taken the child in breach of an order prohibiting his removal from Israel that had been made by the competent Israeli Court at her own request. The Court noted that courts in certain States had taken the view that breaches of such orders gave rise to the application of the 1980 Hague Convention. The Court further noted that the removal had hindered the possible exercise of access rights by the father.

European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)


The European Court of Human Rights, sitting in the Grand Chamber formation, noted that the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) had to be interpreted in harmony with the general principles of international law.

In matters of child abduction, the obligations of Article 8 of the ECHR (right to respect to family and private life) had to be interpreted taking into account the 1980 Hague Convention and the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. However, it was recalled that the ECHR had a special character as an instrument of European public order for the protection of individual human beings.

The Court was competent to review the procedure followed by domestic courts, particularly to ascertain whether in applying and interpreting the 1980 Hague Convention they had secured the guarantees of the ECHR, especially of Article 8 of the ECHR.

In this area the decisive issue was whether a fair balance had been struck between the competing interests at stake, those of the child, of the two parents, as well as of public order, and that this was within the margin of appreciation afforded to States. In such matters the child's best interests were though the primary consideration.

The Court suggested that this was also apparent from the Preamble to the 1980 Hague Convention: "the interests of children are of paramount importance in matters relating to their custody". It added that the child's best interests may, depending on their nature and seriousness, override those of the parents, but the parents' interests, especially in having regular contact with their child, remained a factor when balancing the various interests at stake.

The Court held that child's interest comprised two limbs. First the child's ties with his family must be maintained, except in cases where the family had proved particularly unfit. Family ties could only be severed in very exceptional circumstances and everything must be done to preserve personal relations and, if and when appropriate, to "rebuild" the family.

On the other hand, and secondly, it was also in the child's interest to ensure its "development in a sound environment". A parent could not be entitled under Article 8 of the ECHR to have such measures taken as would harm the child's health and development. The Court noted that the same philosophy was found within the 1980 Hague Convention, in that the prompt return mechanism was balanced against the exceptions to return, notably Article 13(1)(b), grave risk of harm.

The Court concluded this analysis of the principles by noting that it followed from Article 8 of the ECHR that a child's return could not be ordered automatically or mechanically when the 1980 Hague Convention was applicable. The child's best interests, from a personal development perspective, would depend on a variety of individual circumstances, in particular his age and level of maturity, the presence or absence of his parents and his environment and experiences.

Consequently, those best interests had to be assessed in each individual case. This was primarily a task for domestic authorities, and in that they enjoyed a certain margin of appreciation, but this was subject to a European supervision whereby the Court would review under the ECHR the decisions that those authorities have taken in the exercise of that power.

The Court added that it had to ensure that the domestic decision-making process was fair and allowed those concerned to present their case fully. It was for the Court to ascertain whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation and made a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, with a constant concern for determining what the best solution would be for the abducted child in the context of an application for his return to his country of origin.

In respect of the enforcement of return orders the Court re-stated the principles it had elaborated in the case of Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No 39388/05 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]. Applying these principles to the facts of the case, the Court noted in the first instance that the domestic courts had not been unanimous as to the appropriate outcome, and only the Federal Court had ordered the child's return. Additionally, a number of experts' reports had concluded that there would be a risk for the child in the event of his return to Israel.

The Court found that in any event the child's return could only be envisaged as taking place were the mother to accompany him. In making its return order the Federal Court had found that there were no grounds objectively justifying the mother's refusal to return to Israel, therefore she could reasonably be expected to return to that country with her child.

The Court held that it must determine whether the latter conclusion was compatible with Article 8 of the ECHR, particularly whether the forced return of the child accompanied by the mother, even though she had ruled out this possibility, would represent a proportionate interference with the right of each to respect for their family life. It noted that the matter was within the margin of appreciation held by the national authorities.

The Court also held that developments occurring since the Federal Court's judgment had to be considered. It further noted that where a return order was to be enforced some time after the abduction, that may undermine the pertinence of the 1980 Hague Convention, which was essentially an instrument of a procedural nature and not a human rights treaty protecting individuals on an objective basis.

The Court held that guidance could be sought in its case law on the expulsion of aliens, according to which, in order to assess the proportionality of an expulsion measure concerning a child who had settled in the host country, it was necessary to take into account the child's best interests and well-being, and in particular the seriousness of the difficulties which he would be likely to encounter in the country of destination and the solidity of social, cultural and family ties both with the host country and with the country of destination. Account was also to be taken of the seriousness of any difficulties which might be encountered in the destination country by accompanying family members.

The Court noted that the child had Swiss nationality, had arrived in the country in 2005, aged two, and had lived there continuously ever since. Whilst he was at an age at which he still had a certain capacity for adaptation, being uprooted again would probably have serious consequences, especially if he were to return on his own. His return to Israel could not therefore be regarded as beneficial. The significant disturbance the child's forced return would be likely to cause in his mind, was though to be weighed against any benefit that he may gain from it. In this the Court noted that the Israeli courts had imposed a limited, supervised right of access on the father. And criminal proceedings against the mother in Israel could not be ruled out entirely.

The Court held that the mother's refusal to return to Israel did not appear totally unjustified. Even if she agreed to return there would be an issue as to who would take care of the child in the event of criminal proceedings and her subsequent imprisonment. The father's capacity to provide care could be called into question, in view of his past conduct and limited financial resources. He had never lived alone with the child and had not seen him since 2005.

In the light of all the foregoing considerations, particularly the subsequent developments in the situation of mother and child, the Court ruled that it was not convinced it would be in the child's best interests for him to return to Israel. Moreover, the mother would sustain a disproportionate interference with her right to respect for her family life if she were forced to return to Israel. Consequently, there would be a violation of Article 8 of the ECHR in respect of both applicants if the decision ordering the child's return to Israel were to be enforced.

The judgment of the Court was adopted by 16 votes to 1, although certain members of the majority delivered supplementary judgments. A dissenting judgment was given by Judge Zupan?i? on the basis that the violation of Article 8 of the ECHR was not conditional, but had already occurred. Furthermore he questioned the reasoning of the majority and its reliance on the previous comparable case of Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No 39388/05 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]. He submitted that the Court had in fact reversed the latter decision and "its logic".

Procedural Matters


The Court unanimously awarded mother and child 15,000 Euros in respect of costs and expenses. No claim had been made in respect of pecuniary damage.

INCADAT comment

The Court, in asserting that the child's best interests were the primary consideration, sought to draw a parallel with the 1980 Hague Convention and in this referred to the latter's Preamble, in which it is affirmed that: "the interests of children are of paramount importance in matters relating to their custody". The use of the plural form in the 1980 Hague Convention Preamble is however significant for the instrument draws a clear distinction between the interests of children in general, who should be protected from the harm resulting from unilateral removals and retentions, and the interests of the individual child which may be considered within the exercise of the various discretionary exceptions to a summary return order. See also Re S. (A Child) [2012] UKSC 10 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/UKe 1147].

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Primary Carer Abductions

The issue of how to respond when a taking parent who is a primary carer threatens not to accompany a child back to the State of habitual residence if a return order is made, is a controversial one.

There are examples from many Contracting States where courts have taken a very strict approach so that, other than in exceptional situations, the Article 13(1)(b) exception has not been upheld where the non-return argument has been raised, see:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 764]

In this case, a non-return order was made since the facts were exceptional. There had been a genuine threat to the mother, which had put her quite obviously and rightfully in fear for her safety if she returned to Israel. The mother was taken to Israel on false pretences, sold to the Russian Mafia and re-sold to the father who forced her into prostitution. She was locked in, beaten by the father, raped and threatened. The mother was genuinely in a state of fear and could not be expected to return to Israel. It would be wholly inappropriate to send the child back without his mother to a father who had been buying and selling women and running a prostitution business.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 269]

However, in a more recent English Court of Appeal judgment, the C. v. C. approach has been refined:

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

In this case, it was ruled that a mother's refusal to return was capable of amounting to a defence because the refusal was not an act of unreasonableness, but came about as a result of an illness she was suffering from. It may be noted, however, that a return order was nevertheless still made. In this context reference may also be made to the decisions of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1068] and Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1147], in which it was accepted that the anxieties of a respondent mother about return, which were not based upon objective risk to her but nevertheless were of such intensity as to be likely, in the event of a return, to destabilise her parenting of the child to the point at which the child's situation would become intolerable, could in principle meet the threshold of the Article 13(1)(b) exception.

Germany
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Previously a much more liberal interpretation had been adopted:
Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 323]

Switzerland
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 1179]

New Zealand
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770]

United Kingdom - Scotland
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 26]

United States of America
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USs 97]

In other Contracting States, the approach taken with regard to non-return arguments has varied:

Australia
In Australia, early Convention case law exhibited a very strict approach adopted with regard to non-return arguments, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]
 
In State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 283], the Family Court of Australia at Melbourne did find the grave risk of harm exception to be established where the mother would not return, but in this case the mother had been denied entry into the United States of America, the child's State of habitual residence.

Following the judgment of the High Court of Australia (the highest court in the Australian judicial system) in the joint appeals DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 346, 347], greater attention has been focused on the post-return situation facing abducted children.

In the context of a primary-carer taking parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence see: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 544]. 

France
In French case law, a permissive approach to Article 13(1)(b) has been replaced with a much more restrictive interpretation. For examples of the initial approach, see:

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 498]

And for examples of the stricter interpretation, see:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
In Israeli case law there are contrasting examples of the judicial response to non-return arguments:
 
Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 832]

in contrast with:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 833]

Poland
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 700]

The Supreme Court noted that it would not be in the child's best interests if she were deprived of her mother's care, were the latter to choose to remain in Poland. However, it equally affirmed that if the child were to stay in Poland it would not be in her interests to be deprived of the care of her father. For these reasons, the Court concluded that it could not be assumed that ordering the return of the child would place her in an intolerable situation.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 701]

The Supreme Court specified that the frequently used argument of the child's potential separation from the taking parent, did not, in principle, justify the application of the exception. It held that where there were no objective obstacles to the return of a taking parent, then it could be assumed that the taking parent considered his own interest to be more important than those of the child.

The Court added that a taking parent's fear of being held criminally liable was not an objective obstacle to return, as the taking parent should have been aware of the consequences of his actions. The situation with regard to infants was however more complicated. The Court held that the special bond between mother and baby only made their separation possible in exceptional cases, and this was so even if there were no objective obstacles to the mother's return to the State of habitual residence. The Court held that where the mother of an infant refused to return, whatever the reason, then the return order should be refused on the basis of Article 13(1)(b). On the facts, return was ordered.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UY 1185]

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
There are decisions of the ECrtHR which have endorsed a strict approach with regard to the compatibility of Hague Convention exceptions and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Some of these cases have considered arguments relevant to the issue of grave risk of harm, including where an abductor has indicated an unwillingness to accompany the returning child, see:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1169]

In this case, the ECrtHR upheld a challenge by the left-behind father that the refusal of the Turkish courts to return his child led to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The ECrtHR stated that whilst very young age was a criterion to be taken into account to determine the child's interest in an abduction case, it could not be considered by itself a sufficient ground, in relation to the requirements of the Hague Convention, to justify dismissal of a return application.

Recourse has been had to expert evidence to assist in ascertaining the potential consequences of the child being separated from the taking parent

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1177]

However, it must equally be noted that since the Grand Chamber ruling in Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, there are examples of a less strict approach being followed. The latter ruling had emphasised the best interests of the individual abducted child in the context of an application for return and the ascertainment of whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation as well as a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, see:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]; and Grand Chamber ruling X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1171]

In this case, a majority found that the return of a child to the United States of America would lead to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The decision-making process of the Belgian Appellate Court as regards Article 13(1)(b) was held not to have met the procedural requirements inherent in Article 8 of the ECHR. The two dissenting judges noted, however, that the danger referred to in Article 13 should not consist only of the separation of the child from the taking parent.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Faits

La demande concernait un enfant né en Israël en 2003 d'une mère suisse et d'un père israélien. Les parents s'étaient mariés en Israël en 2001. Après la naissance de l'enfant, la mère a affirmé que le père avait rejoint une secte juive ultra-orthodoxe radicale. En juin 2004, craignant que le père n'emmène l'enfant à l'étranger dans une communauté rattachée à la secte, la mère a demandé et obtenu une ordonnance interdisant le déplacement de ce dernier en dehors de la juridiction. L'ordonnance était établie jusqu'à la majorité de l'enfant. Les parents ont divorcé en février 2005. L'ordonnance de garde provisoire préexistante du 27 juin 2004 n'a pas été modifiée ; elle reconnaissait une autorité parentale conjointe mais la mère avait la garde et le père un droit de visite.

Le 20 mars 2005, un mandat d'arrêt a été émis contre le père pour non-paiement de la pension alimentaire. Le 27 mars, la mère a voulu faire lever l'ordonnance de non-déplacement ; sa demande a été rejetée. Le 24 juin 2005, la mère a secrètement emmené l'enfant en Suisse. Elle a été localisée en mai 2006. Le 30 mai 2006, le Tribunal de la famille de Tel Aviv a émis une ordonnance confirmant que le déplacement était illicite. Le 8 juin 2006, le père a introduit une demande de retour.

Le 29 août 2006, le juge de paix du district de Lausanne (Suisse) a refusé d'ordonner le retour de l'enfant, estimant que l'exception de risque grave était établie. Le 27 mai 2007, le Tribunal cantonal de Vaud (Suisse) s'est également fondé sur l'article 13(1) b) de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants pour rejeter l'appel formé par le père. Le 16 août 2007, le Tribunal fédéral suisse a ordonné le retour de l'enfant, estimant que le risque grave n'était pas fondé, 5A_285/2007 /frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIe cour de droit civil, 16 août 2007 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 955].

Le 26 septembre 2007, la mère et l'enfant ont porté l'affaire devant la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme. Le 27 septembre 2007, le Président de la Chambre a fait savoir au Gouvernement suisse qu'il ne devait pas poursuivre la procédure de retour, conformément à l'article 39 du Règlement de la Cour (Mesures provisoires). Le 1er octobre, le père a retiré sa demande d'exécution.

Le 8 janvier 2009, à la majorité de quatre voix contre trois, la Cour a jugé qu'il n'y avait pas eu violation du droit de la mère et de l'enfant au respect de leur vie familiale tel que visé à l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des droits de l'homme (CEDH) : Neulinger et Shuruk c. Suisse, No 41615/07 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1001]. Le 31 mars 2009, les requérants ont demandé le renvoi de l'affaire devant la Grande Chambre. Le collège de la Grande Chambre a accueilli la demande le 5 juin 2009 et a confirmé l'application des mesures provisoires.

Dispositif

Par 16 voix contre une, la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a estimé qu'en cas d'exécution de l'ordonnance de retour, il y aurait violation du droit de la mère et de son enfant au respect de leur vie familiale tel que prévu par l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des droits de l'homme.

Motifs

Droit de garde - art. 3

La mère et l'enfant ont affirmé que la Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants ne pouvait être invoquée dans la mesure où le déplacement en Israël n'était pas illicite.

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme, ayant examiné la jurisprudence étrangère concernant l'interprétation du « droit de garde » au sens de la Convention de La Haye de 1980, a suivi l'approche de la Chambre et des trois tribunaux internes saisis de l'affaire, estimant que le déplacement était bel et bien illicite. Elle a noté que l'« autorité parentale » telle que prévue par l'institution israélienne conférait le droit de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant. Ce droit, devant être exercé conjointement par les parents, avait donc été violé.

De plus, en emmenant l'enfant, la mère avait violé l'ordonnance interdisant qu'il soit déplacé d'Israël, délivrée par le tribunal israélien compétent à sa demande. La Cour a noté que dans certains États, les juridictions étaient parties du principe que la Convention de La Haye de 1980 s'appliquait dès lors que de telles ordonnances étaient violées. La Cour a également souligné que le déplacement avait empêché le père d'exercer son droit de visite.

Droits de l'homme - art. 20
La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme, siégeant en Grande Chambre, a fait remarquer que la Convention européenne des droits de l'homme (CEDH) devait être interprétée en harmonie avec les principes généraux du droit international.

En matière d'enlèvement d'enfants, les obligations en vertu de l'article 8 de la CEDH (droit au respect de la vie privée et familiale) doivent s'interpréter en tenant compte de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 et de la Convention des Nations Unies de 1989 relative aux droits de l'enfant. Toutefois, la Cour a également rappelé la nature particulière de la CEDH, instrument de l'ordre public européen pour la protection des êtres humains.

La Cour était compétente pour contrôler la procédure suivie par les tribunaux internes, en particulier pour rechercher si, dans l'application et l'interprétation de la Convention de La Haye de 1980, ils ont respecté les garanties de la CEDH, et notamment de son article 8.

Dans ce domaine, le point décisif consiste à savoir si le juste équilibre devant exister entre les intérêts concurrents en jeu (ceux de l'enfant, des deux parents et de l'ordre public) a été ménagé, dans les limites de la marge d'appréciation dont jouissent les États. Toutefois, l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant doit constituer la considération déterminante.

La Cour a suggéré que, comme en atteste le Préambule de la Convention de La Haye de 1980, « l'intérêt de l'enfant est d'une importance primordiale pour toute question relative à sa garde ». Elle a ajouté que l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant peut, selon sa nature et sa gravité, l'emporter sur celui des parents, mais leur intérêt, notamment à bénéficier d'un contact régulier avec l'enfant, reste néanmoins un facteur dans la balance des différents intérêts.

La Cour a estimé que l'intérêt de l'enfant présente un double aspect. D'une part, les liens entre l'enfant et sa famille doivent être maintenus, sauf dans les cas où celle-ci se serait montrée particulièrement indigne. Seules des circonstances tout à fait exceptionnelles peuvent conduire à une rupture du lien familial et tout doit être mis en œuvre pour maintenir les relations personnelles et, le cas échéant, le moment venu, « reconstituer » la famille.

D'autre part, garantir à l'enfant une « évolution dans un environnement sain » relève également de cet intérêt. L'article 8 ne saurait autoriser un parent à prendre des mesures préjudiciables à la santé et au développement de son enfant. La Cour a noté que la même philosophie se trouve à la base de la Convention de La Haye de 1980, qui prévoit un mécanisme de retour immédiat mis en balance avec les exceptions au retour visées à l'article 13(1)(b) et impliquant un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant.

La Cour a conclu cette analyse des principes en expliquant qu'il découle de l'article 8 que le retour de l'enfant ne saurait être ordonné de façon automatique ou mécanique dès lors que le Convention de La Haye de 1980 s'applique. L'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant, du point de vue de son développement personnel, dépend en effet de plusieurs circonstances individuelles, notamment de son âge et de sa maturité, de la présence ou de l'absence de ses parents, de l'environnement dans lequel il vit et de son histoire personnelle, c'est pourquoi il doit s'apprécier au cas par cas.

Cette tâche revient en premier lieu aux autorités nationales, qui jouissent pour ce faire d'une certaine marge d'appréciation, laquelle s'accompagne toutefois d'un contrôle européen en vertu duquel la Cour examine sous l'angle de la CEDH les décisions qu'elles ont rendues dans l'exercice de ce pouvoir.

En outre, la Cour doit s'assurer que le processus décisionnel des juridictions nationales a été équitable et a permis aux intéressés de faire valoir pleinement leurs droits. À cette fin, elle doit vérifier si les juridictions nationales se sont livrées à un examen approfondi de l'ensemble de la situation familiale et ont procédé à une évaluation équilibrée et raisonnable des intérêts de chacun, avec le souci constant de déterminer quelle était la meilleure solution pour l'enfant enlevé dans le cadre d'une demande de retour dans son pays d'origine.

S'agissant de l'exécution des ordonnances de retour, la Cour a réaffirmé les principes qu'elle avait déjà posés dans l'affaire Maumousseau et Washington c. France, No 39388/05 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 942].

En vertu de ces principes, la Cour a tout d'abord noté que les juridictions nationales saisies du dossier n'avaient pas été unanimes quant à la suite à lui donner, faisant remarquer que seul le Tribunal fédéral avait ordonné le retour de l'enfant. Par ailleurs, plusieurs rapports d'expertise ont conclu à l'existence d'un danger pour l'enfant en cas de retour en Israël. La Cour a estimé qu'en tout état de cause, seul un retour de l'enfant avec sa mère était envisageable. Le Tribunal fédéral a d'ailleurs lui-même considéré qu'en l'absence de motifs qui justifieraient objectivement un refus de la mère de rentrer en Israël, on pouvait raisonnablement attendre de celle-ci qu'elle retourne dans cet État avec l'enfant.

La Cour a estimé qu'elle devait déterminer si cette dernière conclusion était compatible avec l'article 8 de la CEDH, et notamment si le retour forcé de l'enfant, accompagné de sa mère, bien que cette dernière semble exclure cette possibilité, représenterait une ingérence proportionnée dans le droit au respect de la vie familiale de chacun. Elle a fait remarquer que cette mesure était dans la marge d'appréciation des autorités nationales.

La Cour a également jugé qu'il convenait de tenir compte des développements qui se sont produits depuis l'arrêt du Tribunal fédéral, estimant que si l'exécution de l'ordonnance de retour intervenait un certain temps après l'enlèvement, cela pouvait affecter la pertinence de la Convention de La Haye de 1980, qui est essentiellement un instrument de nature procédurale, et non un traité relatif à la protection des droits de l'homme, protégeant les individus de manière objective.

La Cour a estimé qu'elle pouvait s'inspirer ici de sa jurisprudence sur l'expulsion des étrangers, en vertu de laquelle, pour apprécier la proportionnalité d'une mesure d'expulsion visant un mineur intégré dans le pays d'accueil, il y a lieu de prendre en compte son intérêt et son bien-être, en particulier la gravité des difficultés qu'il est susceptible de rencontrer dans le pays de destination, ainsi que la solidité des liens sociaux, culturels et familiaux avec la pays hôte, d'une part, et avec le pays de destination, d'autre part. Entre également en ligne de compte la gravité des difficultés que l'un des membres de la famille, accompagnant la personne menacée d'expulsion, risque de rencontrer dans le pays vers lequel elle doit être expulsée.

La Cour a noté que l'enfant avait la nationalité suisse, était arrivé dans le pays en 2005, à l'âge de deux ans, et y avait vécu depuis lors sans interruption. Même s'il était à un âge où la capacité d'adaptation est encore grande, le fait d'être une nouvelle fois déraciné de son milieu habituel aurait sans doute des conséquences graves pour lui, en particulier s'il rentrait seul. Son retour en Israël ne saurait donc être considéré comme bénéfique.

Le trouble important que le retour forcé de l'enfant risque de provoquer dans son esprit doit être pesé par rapport au bénéfice qu'il est susceptible d'en retirer. À cet égard, la Cour a relevé que des restrictions avaient été imposées par les tribunaux israéliens au droit de visite sous surveillance du père. Sans compter que la mère pourrait être exposée à des sanctions pénales, un risque qu'il est impossible d'exclure entièrement.

La Cour a estimé que le refus de la mère de retourner en Israël n'était pas entièrement injustifié. À supposer même qu'elle consente à retourner en Israël, se pose alors la question de savoir qui prendrait en charge l'enfant dans l'hypothèse où elle serait poursuivie puis incarcérée. Il est permis de douter des capacités du père à cet égard, compte tenu de son comportement passé et de ses ressources financières limitées. Il n'a jamais habité seul avec l'enfant et ne l'a pas vu depuis 2005.

À la lumière de ces considérations, notamment des changements survenus quant à la situation de la mère et de l'enfant, la Cour n'était pas convaincue qu'il soit dans l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant de retourner en Israël. En outre, la mère subirait une ingérence disproportionnée dans son droit au respect de la vie familiale si elle était contrainte de rentrer en Israël. En conséquence, il y aurait violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH dans le chef des deux requérants si la décision ordonnant le retour en Israël de l'enfant était exécutée.

Ce jugement a été adopté par 16 voix contre une, bien que certains membres de la majorité aient exposé des opinions séparées. Le juge Zupan?i? a exprimé une opinion dissidente, en votant contre le constat d'une violation conditionnelle de l'article 8, car il estimait que cet article était déjà violé. Il a également mis en doute le raisonnement suivi par la majorité et a jugé qu'il était erroné de s'appuyer sur l'affaire Maumousseau et Washington c. France, No 39388/05 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 942], estimant que le jugement constituait un revirement complet par rapport à la précédente affaire analogue et à sa « logique ».

Question procédurales
À l'unanimité, la Cour a octroyé à la mère et à l'enfant la somme de 15 000 euros au titre des frais et dépens. Les requérants n'avaient rien demandé au titre du dommage matériel.

Convention européenne des droits de l’homme (CEDH)

-

Questions procédurales

-

Commentaire INCADAT

En affirmant que l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant était primordial, la Cour a cherché à établir un parallèle avec la Convention de La Haye de 1980 et s'est pour ce faire référée à son Préambule, disposant que « l'intérêt de l'enfant est d'une importance primordiale pour toute question relative à sa garde ». Cette formulation est significative dans la mesure où le Préambule de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 distingue clairement l'intérêt de l'enfant au sens général, en ce que l'enfant devrait être protégé d'un déplacement ou d'une rétention illicite, et l'intérêt particulier de chaque enfant, devant être envisagé au regard des différentes exceptions au retour, par l'exercice d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire. Voir aussi Re S. (A Child) [2012] UKSC 10 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1147].

Jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CourEDH)

Enlèvements par le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant

La question de la position à adopter dans les situations où le parent ravisseur est le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, et qu'il menace de ne pas rentrer avec l'enfant dans l'État de résidence habituelle si une ordonnance de retour est rendue, est controversée.

De nombreux États contractants ont adopté une position très stricte au terme de laquelle le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b) n'a été retenu que dans des circonstances exceptionnelles quand l'argument tendant au non-retour de l'enfant était invoqué. Voir :

Autriche
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

Dans cette affaire, les circonstances exceptionnelles ont résulté en une ordonnance de non-retour. La mère faisait face à une menace véritable qui lui faisait craindre légitimement pour sa sécurité si elle retournait en Israël. Elle avait été emmenée en Israël sous un faux prétexte, y avait été vendue à la mafia russe puis revendue au père, qui l'avait forcée à se prostituer. Elle avait alors été enfermée, battue par le père, violée et menacée. La mère était dans un réel état de peur, on ne pouvait attendre d'elle qu'elle retourne en Israël. Il aurait été complètement inapproprié de renvoyer l'enfant sans sa mère vers un père qui avait acheté et vendu des femmes, et dirigé des activités de prostitution.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

Toutefois, dans un jugement plus récent rendu par une Cour d'appel anglaise, la position adoptée en 1989 dans l'affaire C. v. C. fut précisée. Voir :

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Dans cette affaire, il fut décidé que le refus de la mère de retourner dans l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle était susceptible de déclencher le jeu de l'exception en ce qu'il n'était pas imputable à un comportement excessif mais à une maladie dont elle souffrait. Il convient de noter qu'une ordonnance de retour fut malgré tout rendue. On peut également mentionner à ce sujet les décisions de la Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni dans Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] et Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. Dans cette dernière affaire, il fut accepté que les angoisses d'une mère concernant son retour satisfaisaient le niveau de risque requis à l'article 13(1)(b) et justifiaient le jeu de cette exception quoiqu'elles n'étaient pas fondées sur un risque objectif. L'ampleur de ces angoisses était telle qu'elles lui auraient probablement causé des difficultés à assumer normalement son rôle de parent en cas de retour, au point de rendre la situation de l'enfant intolérable.

Allemagne
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Auparavant, une position beaucoup plus libérale avait été adoptée :

Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suisse
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Etats-Unis d'Amérique
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position adoptée quant aux arguments tendant au non-retour de l'enfant a varié :

Australie
En Australie, la jurisprudence ancienne témoigne d'une position initialement très stricte. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

Dans l'affaire State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], le Tribunal de Melbourne avait estimé qu'il y avait bien un risque grave de danger alors que la mère refusait de rentrer avec l'enfant. En l'espèce, toutefois, la mère ne pouvait pas retourner aux États-Unis, État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant, car les autorités de ce pays lui refusaient l'entrée sur le territoire.

Plus récemment, suite à la décision de la Cour suprême qui avait été saisie des appels joints dans D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], les tribunaux ont accordé une attention plus particulière à la situation à laquelle l'enfant allait devoir faire face après son retour.

Pour une illustration de ce phénomène dans une affaire où le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant refusait de rentrer avec lui dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle, voir : Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

France
Dans la jurisprudence française, l'interprétation permissive de l'article 13(1)(b) qui prévalait initialement a été remplacée par une interprétation beaucoup plus stricte. Pour une illustration de l'interprétation permissive initiale. Voir :

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

et pour une illustration de l'interprétation plus stricte, voir :

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israël
Il existe dans la jurisprudence israélienne des exemples contrastés du traitement des exceptions au retour :

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]  contrastant avec :

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Pologne
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Cour Suprême nota qu'il ne serait pas conforme à l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant de la priver des soins de sa mère, si celle-ci décidait de rester en Pologne. La Cour affirma cependant que si l'enfant devait rester en Pologne, il serait tout autant contraire à son intérêt d'être privée des soins de son père. Tenant compte de ces considérations, la Cour conclut qu'il ne pouvait pas être présumé qu'ordonner le retour de l'enfant la placerait dans une situation intolérable.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Cour suprême précisa que l'argument fréquemment avancé de la potentielle séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur ne justifiait pas, en principe, le jeu de l'exception. La Cour jugea qu'en l'absence d'obstacles objectifs au retour du parent ravisseur, on pouvait présumer que celui-ci accordait plus de valeur à ses propres intérêts qu'à ceux de l'enfant.

La Cour ajouta que la crainte pour le parent ravisseur de voir sa responsabilité pénale engagée ne constituait pas un obstacle objectif au retour, puisque celui-ci aurait dû avoir conscience des conséquences de ses actions. La situation était cependant plus compliquée s'agissant des nourrissons. La Cour estima que le lien spécial unissant la mère et le nourrisson ne rendait la séparation possible qu'en cas exceptionnel, et ce même en l'absence d'obstacle objectif au retour de la mère dans l'État de résidence habituelle. La Cour jugea que lorsque la mère d'un nourrisson refusait de revenir avec lui, quelles qu'en soient les raisons, alors le retour devait être refusé sur la base de l'article 13(1)(b). D'après les faits de l'espèce, le retour avait été ordonné.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
Il existe des décisions de la CourEDH adoptant une position stricte relativement à la compatibilité des exceptions de la Convention de La Haye avec la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH). Dans certaines de ces affaires, des arguments relatifs à l'exception pour risque grave étaient considérés, y compris lorsque le parent ravisseur indiquait son refus d'accompagner le retour de l'enfant. Voir :

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH confirma un recours du père à qui l'enfant avait été enlevé selon lequel les juridictions turques avaient commis une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH en refusant d'ordonner le retour de son enfant. La CourEDH jugea que, bien que le très jeune âge d'un enfant soit un critère à prendre en compte dans la détermination de son intérêt, cela ne constituait pas en soi, selon les exigences de la Convention de La Haye, un motif suffisant pour justifier le rejet d'une demande de retour.

Il a parfois été fait recours à des témoignages d'expert afin de faciliter l'évaluation des conséquences potentielles de la séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur. Voir :

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Cependant, il faut également noter que, depuis la décision de la Grande Chambre dans l'affaire Neulinger et Shuruk c Suisse, il est des exemples où une approche moins stricte est suivie. Dans le contexte d'une demande de retour, ce dernier jugement avait placé l'accent sur l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant enlevé et sur le fait de vérifier que les autorités nationales compétentes avaient conduit un examen détaillé de la situation familiale dans son ensemble ainsi qu'une appréciation équilibrée et raisonnable de tous les intérêts en jeu. Voir :

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; et décision de la Grand Chamber X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH estima à la majorité que le retour d'un enfant aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique entrainerait une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH. Il fut jugé que le processus de prise de décision de la Cour d'appel belge, en ce qui concerne l'article 13(1)(b), n'avait pas satisfait aux exigences procédurales posées par l'article 8 de la CEDH. Les deux juges dissidents notèrent cependant que le danger visé par l'article 13 ne saurait résulter de la seule séparation de l'enfant et du parent ravisseur.

(Auteur: Peter McEleavy, avril 2013)

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.