CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316

INCADAT reference

HC/E/CNh 234

Court

Country

CHINA (HONG KONG, SAR)

Name

High Court of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Waung J.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Requested State

CHINA (HONG KONG, SAR)

Decision

Date

4 March 1998

Status

Final

Grounds

Aims of the Convention - Preamble, Arts 1 and 2 | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Undertakings | Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2) | Procedural Matters

Order

Return ordered with undertakings offered

HC article(s) Considered

3 4 11 12 13(1)(b) 13(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(1)(b) 13(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Emmett v. Perry (1995) FLC 82-519; Gazi v. Gazi (1993) FLC 92-341; Re K. (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1995] 1 FLR 977; Re M. (Abduction: Undertakings) [1995] 1 FLR 1021.

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Convention Aims
Convention Aims

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse
Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection
Extreme Reaction to a Return Order

Implementation & Application Issues

Measures to Facilitate the Return of Children
Undertakings
Procedural Matters
Oral Evidence

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child, a boy, was 6 1/2 at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. He had lived in England all of his life. The parents were separated and the mother had physical custody of the child.

On 23 July 1997 an application by the mother to relocate with the child to Hong Kong was rejected by the Leicester County Court.
 
On 6 December 1997, the mother took the child to Hong Kong, her State of origin. On 24 January 1998, the Hong Kong Central Authority initiated return proceedings.

Ruling

Return ordered and undertakings offered; the removal was wrongful and the standard required under Article 13(1)(b) to indicate that the child would face a grave risk of physical harm had not been met.

Grounds

Aims of the Convention - Preamble, Arts 1 and 2

The principle governing the Convention is for immediate return of abducted children to their home jurisdictions. The procedure is summary and speed is of the essence. It differs entirely from purely domestic proceedings concerned with making orders based upon the best interests of the child principle.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The risk of physical harm must be weighty and of substantial or severe, not trivial, harm. A very high degree of intolerability of physical harm must be established. The test is a stringent one and will only be satisfied in exceptional circumstances. The assertion that the child, who suffered from a respiratory illness, would face a grave risk of harm by exposure to turkeys on the family farm in England was rejected.

Undertakings

The father was ordered to obtain a report on the condition of the child and proper medical steps to be taken, to supply the medical report to the mother, to apply to the Leicester County Court for directions on the residence of the child and the health measures necessary, to maintain close supervision of child, and to meet with the Hong Kong doctors prior to departure to the United Kingdom to discuss any protective measures that should be implemented at the farm.

Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

The court noted that in general a child of 6 was too young for his views to be taken into account. Having interviewed the child the court concluded that he was not sufficiently mature. The court applied the finding in the Australian decision Emmett v. Perry that the relevant time for a child's objection was the time the removal took place. On that basis, according to the father's diary for December 1997/January 1998, the preference of the child would probably have been for a return to the United Kingdom.

Procedural Matters

The court refused to admit oral evidence. It noted that oral evidence was very rare in Convention cases and should be allowed only sparingly for otherwise it would defeat the primary purpose of speed.

INCADAT comment

On 13 April 1998, one day before he was to be returned to the United Kingdom, the child was killed by a lethal injection administered by the mother. The mother subsequently committed suicide.

The position in the instant case and in the Australian case Emmett v. Perry (1996) 92-645 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 280], with regard to the moment when the views of a child should be operative has not been adopted or considered elsewhere.

Convention Aims

Courts in all Contracting States must inevitably make reference to and evaluate the aims of the Convention if they are to understand the purpose of the instrument, and so be guided in how its concepts should be interpreted and provisions applied.

The 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention, explicitly and implicitly, embodies a range of aims and objectives, positive and negative, as it seeks to achieve a delicate balance between the competing interests of the central actors; the child, the left behind parent and the abducting parent, see for example the discussion in the decision of the Canadian Supreme Court: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 17].

Article 1 identifies the core aims, namely that the Convention seeks:
"a) to secure the prompt return of children wrongfully removed to or retained in any Contracting State; and
 b) to ensure that rights of custody and of access under the law of one Contracting State are effectively respected in the other Contracting States."

Further clarification, most notably to the primary purpose of achieving the return of children where their removal or retention has led to the breach of actually exercised rights of custody, is given in the Preamble.

Therein it is recorded that:

"the interests of children are of paramount importance in matters relating to their custody;

and that States signatory desire:

 to protect children internationally from the harmful effects of their wrongful removal or retention;

 to establish procedures to ensure their prompt return to the State of their habitual residence; and

 to secure protection for rights of access."

The aim of return and the manner in which it should best be achieved is equally reinforced in subsequent Articles, notably in the duties required of Central Authorities (Arts 8-10) and in the requirement for judicial authorities to act expeditiously (Art. 11).

Article 13, along with Articles 12(2) and 20, which contain the exceptions to the summary return mechanism, indicate that the Convention embodies an additional aim, namely that in certain defined circumstances regard may be paid to the specific situation, including the best interests, of the individual child or even taking parent.

The Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report draws (at para. 19) attention to an implicit aim on which the Convention rests, namely that any debate on the merits of custody rights should take place before the competent authorities in the State where the child had his habitual residence prior to its removal, see for example:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AR 362]
 
Finland
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 839]

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 214]

Netherlands
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NL 316]

Switzerland
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 986]

United Kingdom - Scotland
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 996]

United States of America
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 125]
 
The Pérez-Vera Report equally articulates the preventive dimension to the instrument's return aim (at paras. 17, 18, 25), a goal which was specifically highlighted during the ratification process of the Convention in the United States (see: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) and which has subsequently been relied upon in that Contracting State when applying the Convention, see:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 741]

Applying the principle of equitable tolling where an abducted child had been concealed was held to be consistent with the purpose of the Convention to deter child abduction.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 578]

In contrast to other federal Courts of Appeals, the 11th Circuit was prepared to interpret a ne exeat right as including the right to determine a child's place of residence since the goal of the Hague Convention was to deter international abduction and the ne exeat right provided a parent with decision-making authority regarding the child's international relocation.

In other jurisdictions, deterrence has on occasion been raised as a relevant factor in the interpretation and application of the Convention, see for example:

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 754]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 50]

Aims and objectives may equally rise to prominence during the life of the instrument, such as the promotion of transfrontier contact, which it has been submitted will arise by virtue of a strict application of the Convention's summary return mechanism, see:

New Zealand
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 296]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 60]

There is no hierarchy between the different aims of the Convention (Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report, at para. 18).  Judicial interpretation may therefore differ as between Contracting States as more or less emphasis is placed on particular objectives.  Equally jurisprudence may evolve, whether internally or internationally.

In United Kingdom case law (England and Wales) a decision of that jurisdiction's then supreme jurisdiction, the House of Lords, led to a reappraisal of the Convention's aims and consequently a re-alignment in court practice as regards the exceptions:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

Previously a desire to give effect to the primary goal of promoting return and thereby preventing an over-exploitation of the exceptions, had led to an additional test of exceptionality being added to the exceptions, see for example:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 901]

It was this test of exceptionality which was subsequently held to be unwarranted by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

- Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine:

In United States Convention case law different approaches have been taken in respect of applicants who have or are alleged to have themselves breached court orders under the "fugitive disentitlement doctrine".

In Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 150], the fugitive disentitlement doctrine was applied, the applicant father in the Convention application having left the United States to escape his criminal conviction and other responsibilities to the United States courts.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July 25, 2000) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 326]

In the instant case the father was a fugitive. Secondly, it was arguable there was some connection between his fugitive status and the petition. But the court found that the connection not to be strong enough to support the application of the doctrine. In any event, the court also held that applying the fugitive disentitlement doctrine would impose too severe a sanction in a case involving parental rights.

In March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 386], the doctrine was not applied where the applicant was in breach of civil orders.

In the Canadian case Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 760], the father's fugitive status was held to be a factor in there being a grave risk of harm facing the child.

Author: Peter McEleavy

Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse

Courts have responded in different ways when faced with allegations that the left-behind parent has acted inappropriately or sexually abused the wrongfully removed or retained children. In the most straightforward cases the accusations may simply be dismissed as unfounded. Where this is not possible courts have been divided as to whether a detailed investigation should be undertaken in the State of refuge, or, whether the relevant assessment should be conducted in the State of habitual residence, with interim measures being taken to attempt to protect the child on his return.

- Accusations Dismissed:

Belgium

Civ. Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/BE 706]

The father claimed that the mother sought the return of the child to have her declared mentally incapable and to sell her organs. The Court held, however, that even if the father's accusations were firmly held, they were not backed up by any evidence.
 
Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 666]
 
The Court held that if the mother had serious concerns with regard to her son, then she would not have left him in the care of the father on holiday after what she claimed there had been a serious incident.
 
J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, No 500-04-046027-075 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 968]

The mother claimed that a grave risk arose because the father was a sexual predator.
The Court noted that such allegations had been rejected in foreign proceedings. It equally drew attention to the fact that Convention proceedings concerned the return of the child and not the issue of custody. The fears of the mother and of the maternal grandparents were deemed to be largely irrational. There was also no proof that the judicial authorities in the State of habitual residence were corrupt. The Court instead expressed concerns about the actions of members of the maternal family (who had abducted the child notwithstanding the existence of three court orders to the contrary) as well as the mental state of the mother, who had kept the child in a state of fear of the father.

France
CA Amiens, 4 mars 1998, No de RG 5704759 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 704]

The Court rejected the allegation of physical violence against the father; if there had been violence, it was not of the level required to activate Article 13(1)(b).

New Zealand
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 303]

The Court rejected arguments by the mother that the father's alleged sexual practices would place the child at a grave risk of harm. The Court held that there was no evidence a return would expose the child to the level of harm contemplated under Article 13(1)(b).

Switzerland
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Appellate Court of the Canton Zurich), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 426]

The mother argued that the father was a danger to the children because, inter alia, he had sexually abused the daughter. In rejecting this accusation, the Court noted that the mother had previously been willing to leave the children in the father's sole care whilst she went abroad.

- Return ordered with investigation to be carried out in the State of habitual residence:

United Kingdom - England and Wales

N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 19]

The possible risk to the daughter needed to be investigated in the pending custody proceedings in Australia. In the interim, the child needed protection. However, this protection did not require the refusal of the application for her return. Such risk of physical harm as might exist was created by unsupervised contact to the father, not by return to Australia.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 361]

It was argued that the allegations of sexual abuse by the mother's cohabitee were of such a nature as to activate the Article 13(1)(b) exception. This was rejected by the Court. In doing this the Court noted that the Swedish authorities were aware of the case and had taken steps to ensure that the child would be protected upon her return: she would be placed in an analysis home with her mother. If the mother did not agree to this, the child would be placed in care. The Court also noted that the mother had now separated from her cohabitee.

Finland
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 360]

When considering whether the allegations of the father's sexual abuse of his daughter constituted a barrier to returning the children, the Court noted that one of the objectives of the Hague Child Abduction Convention was that the forum for the determination of custody issues was not to be changed at will and that the credibility of allegations as to the personal characteristics of the petitioner were most properly investigated in the spouses' common State of habitual residence. In addition, the Court noted that a grave risk of harm did not arise if the mother were to return with the children and saw to it that their living conditions were arranged in their best interests. Accordingly, the Court found that there was no barrier to the return of the children.

Ireland
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IE 389]

The Irish Supreme Court accepted that there was prima facie evidence of sexual abuse by the father and that the children should not be returned into his care. However, it found that the trial judge had erred in concluding that this amounted to a grave risk of harm in returning the children to England per se. In the light of the undertakings given by the father, there would be no grave risk in returning the children to live in the former matrimonial home in the sole care of their mother.

- Investigation to be undertaken in the State of refuge:

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/HK 595]

The Court of Appeal criticised the fact that the return order had been made conditional on the acts of a third party (the Swiss Central Authority) over whom China's (Hong Kong SAR) Court had neither jurisdiction nor control. The Court ruled that unless and until the allegations could be discounted altogether or after investigation could be found to have no substance, it was almost inconceivable that the trial court's discretion could reasonably and responsibly be exercised to return the child to the environment in which the alleged abuse took place.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. 2002) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 459]

The Court of Appeals for the First Circuit ruled that great care had to be exercised before returning a child where there existed credible evidence of the child having suffered sexual abuse. It further stated that a court should be particularly wary about using potentially unenforceable undertakings to try to protect a child in such situations.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 971]

The District Court had appointed an independent expert in paediatrics, child abuse, child sexual abuse and child pornography, to assess whether the photographs of the sons constituted child pornography and whether the behaviour problems suffered by the children were indications of sexual abuse. The expert reported that there was no evidence to suggest that the father was a paedophile, that he was sexually aroused by children, or that the pictures were pornographic. The expert approved of the German investigations and stated that they were accurate assessments and that their conclusions were consistent with their reported observations. The expert determined that the symptoms that the boys displayed were consistent with the stress in their lives caused by the acrimonious custody dispute and recommended that the boys not undergo further sexual abuse evaluation because it would increase their already-dangerous stress levels.

- Return Refused:

United Kingdom - Scotland

Q., Petitioner [2001] SLT 243 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 341]

The Court held that there was a possibility that the allegations of abuse were true. It was also possible that the child, if returned, could be allowed into the unsupervised company of the alleged abuser. The Court equally noted that a court in another Hague Convention country would be able to provide adequate protection. Consequently it was possible for a child to be returned where an allegation of sexual abuse had been made. However, on the facts, the Court ruled that in light of what had happened in France during the course of the various legal proceedings, the courts there might not be able or willing to provide adequate protection for the children. Consequently, the risk amounted to a grave risk that the return of the girl would expose her to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place her in an intolerable situation.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 597]

Having found that sexual abuse had occurred, the Court of Appeals ruled that this rendered immaterial the father's arguments that the courts of Sweden could take ameliorative actions to prevent further harm once the children had been returned. The Court of Appeals held that in such circumstances, Article 13(1)(b) did not require separate consideration either of undertakings or of the steps which might be taken by the courts of the country of habitual residence.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Extreme Reaction to a Return Order

In a certain number of cases the reaction of children to a proposed return to the State of habitual residence goes beyond a mere objection and may manifest itself in physical opposition to being sent back or the threat of suicide. There have also been examples of an abducting parent threatening to commit suicide if forced to return to the child's State of habitual residence.


Physical Resistance

There are several examples of cases where the views of the children concerned were not gathered or were initially not acted upon and this resulted in the children taking steps to prevent the return order being enforced; in each case the return order was subsequently overturned or dismissed, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 56];

The children attempted to open the door of the aircraft taking them back to Australia as it taxied for take off at London's Heathrow airport.

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1998] 1 FLR 422 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 167];

The younger of two siblings, a girl aged 12, refused to board a plane to take her back to Denmark. Ironically, the older brother had only been made subject to the return order to ensure the siblings would not be separated.

Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 420];

The children attacked the court officers sent to take them to Heathrow airport for their flight back to New Zealand.

Australia
Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864];

An 11 year old boy resisted attempts to place him on a plane to the United States of America.


Threat of Suicide

Where it is alleged at trial that the child or abducting parent will commit suicide if forced to return, it is for the court seized to decide on the veracity of the claim in the light of the available evidence and the circumstances of the case.

The issue of course may not always be raised, as happened in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region case S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 234] where after a return order was made the mother killed her child and then committed suicide.


Threat of Suicide - Child

Evidence that the child concerned had threatened to commit suicide was central to a non-return order being made in the following cases:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re R. (A Minor Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 105 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 59].

Israel
Evidence that a child had previously made a suicide attempt in the State of habitual residence was not accepted as justifying a non-return order in:

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 834].

A submission that a child would commit suicide was not accepted as justifying a non-return order in:

B. v. G., Supreme Court 8 April 2008 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 923].

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 213].


Threat of Suicide - Abducting parent

Evidence that the abducting parent may commit suicide if forced to return to the child's State of habitual residence has been upheld as creating a situation where the child concerned would be at a grave risk of harm and should not therefore be sent back, see:

Australia
J.L.M. v. Director-General NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 347];

Director-General, Department of Families v. RSP [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 544].


Illness

New Zealand
Secretary for Justice v. C., ex parte H., 28/04/2000, transcript, District Court at Otahuhu [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 534].

The latter meeting, during which the child's counsel was present, terminated when the boy became unwell and vomited as a result of the judge mentioning the possibility of a return to Australia.

Undertakings

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Oral Evidence

To ensure that Convention cases are dealt with expeditiously, as is required by the Convention, courts in a number of jurisdictions have restricted the use of oral evidence, see:

Australia
Gazi v. Gazi (1993) FLC 92-341, 16 Fam LR 18; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 277]

It should be noted however that more recently Australia's supreme jurisdiction, the High Court, has cautioned against the ‘inadequate, albeit prompt, disposition of return applications', rather a ‘thorough examination on adequate evidence of the issues' was required, see:

M.W. v. Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] HCA 12, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 988].

Canada
Katsigiannis v. Kottick-Katsigianni (2001), 55 O.R. (3d) 456 (C.A.); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 758].

The Court of Appeal for Ontario held that if credibility was a serious issue, courts should consider hearing viva voce evidence of witnesses whose credibility is in issue.

China - Hong Kong
S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 234];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 40];

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37].

In the above case it was accepted that a situation where oral evidence should be allowed was where the affidavit evidence was in direct conflict.

Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWCA Civ 1366, [2005] 1 FLR 727; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 771]

In the above case the Court of Appeal ruled that a trial judge could consider of his own motion to allow oral evidence where he conceived that oral evidence might be determinative of the case.

However, to warrant oral exploration of written evidence as to the existence of a grave risk of harm which was only embryonic on the written material, a judge must be satisfied that there was a realistic possibility that oral evidence would establish an Article 13(1) b) case.

Re F. (Abduction: Child's Wishes) [2007] EWCA Civ 468, [2007] 2 FLR 697; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 906]

Here the Court of Appeal affirmed that where the exception of acquiescence was alleged oral evidence was more commonly allowed because of the necessity to ascertain the applicant's subjective state of mind, as well as his communications in response to knowledge of the removal or retention.

Finland
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FI 839].

Ireland
In the Matter of M. N. (A Child) [2008] IEHC 382; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 992].

The trial judge noted that applications were heard on affidavit evidence only, except where the Court, in exceptional circumstances, directed or permitted oral evidence.

New Zealand
Secretary for Justice v. Abrahams, ex parte Brown; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 492];

Hall v. Hibbs [1995] NZFLR 762; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 248];

South Africa
Pennello v. Pennello [2003] 1 All SA 716; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 497];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

In the above case the Supreme Court of Appeal noted that even where the parties had not requested that oral evidence be admitted, it might be required where a finding on the issue of consent could not otherwise be reached.

United States of America
Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (Cal. App. 3d. Dist., 2005); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 797]

The father argued that the trial court denied him a fair hearing because it determined disputed issues of fact without hearing oral evidence from the parties.

The Court of Appeal rejected this submission noting that nothing in the Hague Convention entitled the father to an evidentiary hearing with sworn witness testimony. Moreover, it noted that under California law declarations could be used in place of witness testimony in various situations.

The Court further ruled that the father could not question the propriety of the procedure used with regard to evidence on appeal because he did not object to the use of affidavits in evidence at trial.

For a consideration of the use of oral evidence in Convention proceedings see: Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 257 et seq.

Under the rules applicable within the European Union for intra-EU abductions (Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 (Brussels II a)) Convention applications are now subject to additional provisions, including the requirement that an applicant be heard before a non-return order is made [Article 11(5) Brussels II a Regulation], and, that the child be heard ‘during the proceedings unless this appears inappropriate having regard to his or her age or degree of maturity' [Article 11(2) Brussels II a Regulation].

Faits

L'enfant, un garçon, était âgé de 6 ans ½ à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Il avait vécu en Angleterre toute sa vie. Ses parents étaient séparés et la mère disposait de la garde physique de l'enfant.

Le 23 juillet 1997, le juge du Comté de Leicester rejeta la demande de la mère tendant à s'établir à Hong Kong avec l'enfant.
 
Le 6 décembre 1997, la mère emmena l'enfant à Hong Kong, dont elle était originaire. Le 24 janvier 1998, l'Autorité Centrale de Hong Kong entama une procédure de retour.

Dispositif

Retour ordonné, des engagements étant proposés ; le déplacement était illicite et les conditions exigées par l'article 13(1)(b) pour indiquer que l'enfant serait exposé à un risque grave de danger physique n'étaient pas remplies.

Motifs

Objectifs de la Convention - Préambule, art. 1 et 2

El principio fundamental del Convenio es realizar la restitución inmediata de los menores sustraídos a su jurisdicción. El proceso es inmediato y la celeridad es de fundamental importancia. Absolutamente difiere de los procedimientos puramente internos preocupados por la toma de decisiones basadas en el principio de bienestar del menor.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

El riesgo de daño físico debe ser importante e implicar un daño substancial o severo y no trivial. Debe establecerse un alto grado de intolerabilidad de daño físico. El test es riguroso y solo será convincente en circunstancias excepcionales. La declaración de que el menor, que padecía una enfermedad respiratoria, enfrentaría un riesgo de daño al ser expuesto a los pavos en la granja familiar en Inglaterra fue rechazada

Engagements

Se le ordenó al padre conseguir un informe de la enfermedad del menor y los pasos médicos a seguir, para suministrarle a la madre el informe médico, para solicitarle al Tribunal del Condado de Leicester (Leicester County Court) instrucciones sobre la residencia del menor y las medidas sanitarias necesarias, para realizar supervisión del menor, y para reunirse con los doctores de Hong Kong antes de su partida para el Reino Unido para discutir cualquier medida de protección que debería ser implementada en la granja.

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)

El tribunal observó que en general un menor de seis años de edad era demasiado joven para que sus opiniones fuesen consideradas. Luego de entrevistar al menor el tribunal concluyó que el mismo no tenía la madurez suficiente. El tribunal aplicó el fallo del caso Australiano Emmett vs. Perry de que el momento relevante para la objeción del menor era el momento en el que se llevó a cabo el traslado. Sobre esa base, según la agenda del padre para diciembre 1997/ enero 1998, elección del menor hubiera probablemente sido ser restituido al Reino Unido.

Questions procédurales

El tribunal se negó a admitir la prueba oral. Observó que la prueba oral no era muy común en los casos del Convenio y debería ser permitida solo con moderación, caso contrario podría frustrar el propósito principal de celeridad.

Commentaire INCADAT

Le 13 avril 1998, la veille de son retour au Royaume-Uni, l'enfant fut assassiné par la mère par injection. Elle se suicida ensuite.

La position de la Cour sur le moment auquel il convient de tirer argument de l'opinion d'un enfant, telle qu'elle apparaît en l'espèce et dans l'affaire australienne Emmett v. Perry (1996) 92-645 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 280], n'a été ni reprise ni discutée dans d'autres espèces.

Objectifs de la Convention

Les juridictions de tous les États contractants doivent inévitablement se référer aux objectifs de la Convention et les évaluer si elles veulent comprendre le but de cet instrument et être ainsi guidées quant à la manière d'interpréter ses notions et d'appliquer ses dispositions.

La Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants comprend explicitement et implicitement toute une série de buts et d'objectifs, positifs et négatifs, car elle cherche à établir un équilibre délicat entre les intérêts concurrents des principaux acteurs : l'enfant, le parent délaissé et le parent ravisseur. Voir, par exemple, le débat sur cette question dans la décision de la Cour suprême du Canada: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 17].

L'article 1 identifie les principaux objectifs, à savoir que la Convention a pour objet :
a) d'assurer le retour immédiat des enfants déplacés ou retenus illicitement dans tout État contractant et
b) de faire respecter effectivement dans les autres États contractants les droits de garde et de visite existant dans un État contractant.

De plus amples détails sont fournis dans le préambule, notamment au sujet de l'objectif premier d'obtenir le retour des enfants, lorsque leur déplacement ou leur rétention a donné lieu à une violation des droits de garde effectivement exercés.  Il y est indiqué que :

L'intérêt de l'enfant est d'une importance primordiale pour toute question relative à sa garde ;

Et les États signataires désirant :
protéger l'enfant, sur le plan international, contre tous les effets nuisibles d'un déplacement ou d'un non-retour illicites et établir des procédures en vue de garantir le retour immédiat de l'enfant dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle et d'assurer la protection du droit de visite.

L'objectif du retour et la manière dont il doit s'effectuer au mieux sont également renforcés dans les articles suivants, notamment en ce qui concerne les obligations des Autorités centrales (art. 8 à 10) et l'obligation faite aux autorités judiciaires de procéder d'urgence (art. 11).

L'article 13, avec les articles 12(2) et 20, qui énonce les exceptions au mécanisme de retour sommaire, indique que la Convention comporte un objectif supplémentaire, à savoir que dans certaines circonstances définies, la situation propre à chaque enfant devrait être prise en compte, notamment l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant ou même du parent ayant emmené l'enfant. 

Le rapport explicatif de Mme Pérez-Vera attire l'attention au paragraphe 9 sur un objectif implicite sur lequel repose la Convention, à savoir que l'examen au fond des questions relatives aux droits de garde doit se faire par les autorités compétentes de l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle avant d'être déplacé, voir par exemple :

Argentine
W. v. O., 14 June 1995, Argentine Supreme Court of Justice, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AR 362];

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 839];

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 January 2007, No 06/002739, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 947];

Israël
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 214];

Pays-Bas
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL 316];

Suisse
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 125].

Le rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera associe également la dimension préventive à l'objectif de retour de l'instrument (para. 17, 18 et 25), un objectif dont il a beaucoup été question pendant le processus de ratification de la Convention aux États-Unis d'Amérique (voir : Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) et sur lequel des juges se sont fondés dans cet État contractant dans leur application de la Convention. Voir :

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1023].

Le fait d'appliquer le principe d'« equitable tolling » lorsqu'un enfant enlevé a été dissimulé a été considéré comme cohérent avec l'objectif de la Convention de décourager l'enlèvement d'enfants.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

À l'inverse des autres instances d'appel fédérales, le tribunal du 11e ressort était prêt à interpréter un droit ne exeat comme incluant le droit de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant, étant donné que le but de la Convention de La Haye est de prévenir l'enlèvement international et que le droit ne exeat donne au parent le pouvoir de décider du pays où l'enfant prendrait résidence.

Dans d'autres juridictions, la prévention a parfois été invoquée comme facteur pertinent dans l'interprétation et l'application de la Convention. Voir par exemple :

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 754] ;

Royaume-Uni  - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 50].

Des buts et objectifs de la Convention peuvent également se trouver au centre de l'attention pendant la vie de l'instrument, comme la promotion du contact transfrontière, qui, selon des arguments avancés en ce sens, découlent d'une application stricte du mécanisme de retour sommaire de la Convention, voir :

Nouvelle-Zélande
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 296];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 60].

Il n'y a pas de hiérarchie entre les différents objectifs de la Convention (para. 18 du rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera). L'interprétation judiciaire peut ainsi diverger selon les États contractants en fonction de l'accent plus ou moins important qui sera placé sur certains objectifs. La jurisprudence peut également évoluer, sur le plan interne ou international.

Dans la jurisprudence britannique du Royaume-Uni (Angleterre et Pays de Galles), une décision de l'instance suprême de cette juridiction, la Chambre des lords, a donné lieu à une ré-évaluation des objectifs de la Convention et, partant, à un réalignement de la pratique judiciaire en ce qui concerne les exceptions :

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Précédemment, la volonté de donner effet à l'objectif premier d'encourager le retour et de prévenir ainsi un recours abusif aux exceptions, avait donné lieu à l'ajout d'un critère additionnel du « caractère exceptionnel », voir par exemple :

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

C'est ce critère du caractère exceptionnel qui fut par la suite considéré comme non fondé par la Chambre des lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, des approches différentes ont été suivies dans la jurisprudence de la Convention à l'égard de demandeurs qui n'ont pas ou n'auraient pas respecté une décision de justice en vertu de la « doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif ».

Dans Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 150], la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif a été appliquée, le père demandeur ayant fui les États-Unis pour échapper à sa condamnation pénale et d'autres responsabilités devant des tribunaux américains.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. 2000), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 326].

Dans l'espèce, le père était un fugitif. Deuxièmement, on pouvait soutenir qu'il y avait un lien entre son statut de fugitif et la demande. Mais la juridiction conclut que le lien n'était pas assez fort pour que la doctrine ait à s'appliquer. En tout état de cause, la juridiction estima également que le fait d'appliquer la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif imposerait une sanction trop sévère dans une affaire de droits parentaux.

Dans March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 386], la doctrine n'a pas été appliquée pour ce qui est du non-respect par le demandeur d'ordonnances civiles.

Dans l'affaire canadienne Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 760], le statut de fugitif du père a été considéré comme un facteur à prendre en compte, en ce sens qu'il y avait là un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant.

Allégations de mauvais traitement et abus sexuel

Les tribunaux ont adopté des positions variables lorsqu'ils ont été confrontés à des allégations selon lesquelles le parent délaissé avait fait subir des mauvais traitements ou abus sexuels à l'enfant déplacé ou retenu illicitement. Dans les affaires les plus simples, les accusations ont pu être rejetées comme non fondées. Lorsqu'il n'était pas évident que l'allégation était manifestement non fondée, les tribunaux se sont montrés divisés quant à savoir si une enquête poussée devait être menée dans l'État de refuge ou bien dans l'État de la résidence habituelle, auquel cas des mesures de protection provisoires seraient prises en vue de protéger l'enfant en cas de retour.

- Accusations déclarées non fondées :

Belgique

Civ Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 706]

Le père prétendait que la mère ne voulait le retour de l'enfant que pour la faire déclarer folle et vendre ses organes. Toutefois, le juge releva que si les déclarations du père relevaient d'une profonde conviction, elles n'étaient pas étayées d'éléments de preuve.

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 666]

La Cour décida que si la mère avait eu des craintes sérieuses à propos de son fils, elle ne l'aurait pas laissé aux soins du père pendant les vacances, après ce qu'elle présentait comme un incident sérieux.

J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, N°500-04-046027-075 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 968]

La mère faisait valoir un risque grave au motif que le père était un prédateur sexuel. La Cour rappela que toutes les procédures étrangères avaient rejeté ces allégations, et indiqua qu'il fallait garder en mémoire que la question posée était celle du retour et non de la garde. Elle constata que les craintes de la mère et de ses parents étaient largement irraisonnées, et que la preuve de la corruption des autorités judiciaires de l'État de résidence habituelle n'était pas davantage rapportée. La Cour exprima au contraire une crainte face à la réaction de la famille de la mère (rappelant qu'ils avaient enlevé l'enfant en dépit de 3 interdictions judiciaires de ce faire), ainsi qu'une critique concernant les capacités mentales de la mère, qui avait maintenu l'enfant dans un climat de peur de son père.

France
CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° RG 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation de violence physique du père à l'égard de l'enfant. S'il pouvait y avoir eu des épisodes violents, ils n'étaient pas de nature à caractériser le risque nécessaire à l'application de l'article 13(1)(b).

Nouvelle Zélande
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 303]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation selon laquelle les habitudes sexuelles du père étaient de nature à causer un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant. Elle ajouta que la preuve n'avait pas été apportée que le retour exposerait l'enfant à un risque tel que l'article 13(1)(b) serait applicable.

Suisse
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Cour d'appel du canton de Zurich) (Suisse), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 426]

La mère prétendait que le père constituait un danger pour les enfants parce qu'il avait entre autres abusé sexuellement de l'enfant. Pour rejeter cet argument, la Cour fit observer que la mère avait jusqu'alors laissé l'enfant vivre seul avec son père pendant qu'elle voyageait à l'étranger.

Retour ordonné et enquête à mener dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 19]

Le risque encouru par l'enfant devait faire l'objet d'une enquête dans le cadre de la procédure de garde en cours en Australie.  Il convenait de protéger l'enfant jusqu'à la conclusion de cette enquête. Toutefois cette nécessité de protection ne devait pas mener au rejet de la demande de retour car le risque était lié non pas au retour en Australie mais à un droit de visite et d'hébergement non surveillé.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 361]

La Cour rejeta les allégations selon lesquelles l'enfant était victime d'abus sexuels de la part du concubin de la mère de nature à déclencher le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b). Pour rejeter l'application de l'article 13(1)(b), la Cour avait relevé que les autorités suédoises étaient conscientes de ce risque d'abus et avaient pris des mesures précises de nature à protéger l'enfant à son retour : elle serait placée dans un foyer d'analyse avec sa mère. Si la mère refusait, alors l'enfant serait ôtée à sa famille et placée dans un foyer. Elle fit également remarquer que la mère s'était séparée de son concubin.

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 360]

Lors de son analyse concernant la question de savoir si l'allégation selon laquelle le père aurait abusé sexuellement de sa fille constituait une barrière au retour de l'enfant, la Cour a fait observer, d'une part, qu'un des objectifs de la Convention de La Haye était d'empêcher que le for devant se prononcer sur le retour de l'enfant soit choisi arbitrairement. La Cour observa, d'autre part, que la crédibilité des allégations devrait être analysée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle des époux car il s'agissait de l'État le mieux placé, et qu'aucun risque grave de danger n'existait si la mère accompagnait les enfants et organisait des conditions de vie dans leur meilleur intérêt. Dans ces conditions le retour pouvait être ordonné.

Irlande
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 389]

La Cour suprême irlandaise a noté qu'à première vue la preuve avait été apportée que les enfants avaient été victimes d'abus sexuels de la part du père et ne devaient pas être placés sous sa garde. Cependant, le tribunal avait estimé à tort que le retour des enfants en lui-même constituerait un risque grave. Au vu des engagements pris par le père, il n'y aurait pas de risque grave à renvoyer les enfants dans leur foyer familial sous la seule garde de la mère.

- Enquête à mener dans l'État de refuge :

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 595]

La Cour d'appel critiqua le fait que le retour était soumis à une condition sur laquelle les juridictions de la Chine (RAS Hong Kong) n'avaient aucun contrôle (ni aucune compétence). La condition posée étant l'action d'un tiers (l'Autorité centrale suisse). La Cour estima que jusqu'à ce que les allégations se révèlent dénuées de fondement, il n'était pas admissible que la cour, dans l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire, décide de renvoyer l'enfant dans le milieu dans lequel les abus s'étaient produits.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir.2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 459]

La Cour d'appel du premier ressort estima que le premier juge aurait dû faire preuve d'une grande prudence avant de renvoyer un enfant alors même qu'il y avait de sérieuses raisons de croire qu'il avait fait l'objet d'abus sexuels. La Cour d'appel ajouta que les juges devaient se montrer particulièrement prudents dans leur tentative de garantir la protection de l'enfant par la voie d'engagements dans des situations analogues.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 971]

Le Tribunal fédéral avait demandé à un pédiatre spécialisé dans les questions de maltraitance, d'abus sexuels sur enfants et de pédopornographie de se prononcer sur la question de savoir si les photos des enfants constituaient des photos pornographiques et si les troubles comportementaux des enfants traduisaient un abus sexuel. L'expert conclut qu'aucun élément ne permettait de déduire que le père était pédophile, qu'il était attiré sexuellement par des enfants ni que les photos étaient pornographiques. Elle approuva l'enquête allemande et constata que les conclusions allemandes étaient conformes aux observations effectuées. Elle ajouta que les symptômes développés par les enfants étaient causés par le stress que la séparation très difficile des parents leur causait. Elle ajouta encore que les enfants ne devaient pas être soumis à d'autres évaluations en vue d'établir un abus sexuel car cela ne ferait qu'ajouter à leur niveau de stress déjà dangereusement élevé.

- Retour refusé :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Q., Petitioner, [2001] SLT 243, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 341]

Le juge estima qu'il était possible que les allégations d'abus fussent exactes. De même, il n'était pas impossible qu'en cas de retour, l'enfant puisse être amené à avoir un contact non surveillé avec l'auteur potentiel de ces abus. Elle observa toutefois que les autorités d'autres États parties à la Convention de La Haye sont susceptibles de fournir une protection adéquate à l'enfant. En conséquence, le retour d'un enfant pouvait être ordonné même en cas d'allégations d'abus sexuels. En l'espèce cependant, le juge estima qu'au regard des différentes procédures ouvertes en France, il semblait que les juridictions compétentes n'étaient pas en mesure de protéger l'enfant, ou pas disposées à le faire. Elle en a déduit que le retour de l'enfant l'exposerait à un risque grave de danger physique ou psychologique ou la placerait de toute autre manière dans une situation intolérable.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 597]

Ces conclusions rendaient inopérants les arguments du père selon lequel les autorités suédoises pourraient prendre des mesures pour limiter tout danger supplémentaire une fois les enfants rentrées dans ce pays. La Cour d'appel décida qu'en ces circonstances, l'application de l'article 13(1)(b) n'exigeait pas que la question des engagements du père soit posée, pas davantage que celle des mesures à prendre par les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle.

(Auteur : Peter McEleavy, Avril 2013)

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Réactions extrêmes à une ordonnance de retour

Dans un certain nombre d'affaires, la réaction des enfants à un possible retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle va bien au-delà d'une simple opposition au retour et peut s'exprimer sous la forme de rébellion physique ou de menaces de suicide. Dans d'autres cas, c'est le parent ravisseur qui menace de se suicider en cas de retour avec l'enfant dans l'État de résidence habituelle.


Résistance physique

Dans certaines affaires où l'opposition des enfants n'avait pas été prise en compte (soit que les enfants n'aient pas été entendus soit que leur opposition ait été ignorée), les enfants prirent des mesures afin d'empêcher l'exécution de la décision de retour ; dans chacune de ces affaires l'ordonnance a été soit annulée soit rejetée, voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 56]:

Les enfants tentèrent d'ouvrir les portes de l'avion les ramenant en Australie alors que celui-ci s'apprêtait à décoller de l'aéroport d'Heathrow.

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1998] 1 FLR 422 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 167] :

La cadette des enfants, une fille âgée de 12 ans, refusa de monter dans l'avion qui devait la ramener au Danemark. Ironiquement son frère aîné n'avait été renvoyé au Danemark par la cour que pour que la fratrie ne soit pas séparée.

Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 420] :

Les enfants s'attaquèrent au personnel judiciaire chargé de les escorter à l'aéroport afin qu'ils retournent en Nouvelle-Zélande.

Australie
Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864] :

Le garçon de 11 ans refusa d'obtempérer au moment où il allait être installé dans un avion en partance pour les États-Unis d'Amérique.


Menaces de Suicide

Lorsque l'enfant ou le parent ravisseur menace de se suicider en cas de retour forcé vers l'État de résidence, il appartient au juge saisi de décider du sérieux de la menace à la lumière de l'ensemble des éléments de preuve dont il dispose.

La menace peut être bien réelle sans avoir été exprimée, comme dans une affaire jugée dans la Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong : S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 234] dans laquelle la mère tua l'enfant et se suicida après le prononcé de l'ordonnance de retour.


Menaces de Suicide - Enfant

La preuve de ce que l'enfant en cause menace de se suicider a été au cœur des affaires suivantes :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re R. (A Minor Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 105 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 59].

Israël
La preuve qu'un enfant avait par le passé fait une tentative de suicide dans l'État de résidence habituelle ne fut pas considérée comme un élément suffisant à justifier le prononcé d'une ordonnance de non-retour. Voir :

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 834].

L'affirmation selon laquelle un enfant commettrait un suicide en cas de retour n'a pas été considérée comme suffisante pour justifier une décision de non-retour dans l'affaire suivante:

B. v. G., Supreme Court 8 April 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 923].

Australie
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 213].


Menaces de Suicide - Parent ayant emmené l'enfant

La preuve de ce que le parent ayant emmené l'enfant pourrait attenter à ses jours en cas de retour de l'enfant a été reconnue comme créant une situation de risque grave de danger pour l'enfant de sorte que le juge n'ordonna pas le retour. Voir :

Australie
J.L.M. v. Director-General NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39 [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/AU 347] ;

Director-General, Department of Families v. RSP [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 544].


Maladie

Nouvelle-Zélande

Secretary for Justice v. C., ex parte H., 28/04/2000, transcript, District Court at Otahuhu [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 534].

La dernière rencontre, pendant laquelle l'avocat de l'enfant était présent, prit fin lorsque le garçon se sentit mal et vomit après que le juge ait mentionné la possibilité d'un retour en Australie.

Engagements

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Preuve présentée oralement

Pour permettre que les affaires relevant de la Convention fassent l'objet d'un traitement rapide, ainsi que le requiert la Convention, les juridictions d'un certain nombre d'États contractants ont restreint l'usage de procédés de preuve orale. Voir :

Australie
Gazi v. Gazi (1993) FLC 92-341, 16 Fam LR 18; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 277]

Il convient toutefois de noter que plus récemment, la Cour suprême d'Australie, la (High Court) a mis en garde contre un traitement « diligent mais inadéquat des demandes de retour », soulignant l'importance d'une « analyse sérieuse, basée sur des éléments de preuve adéquats ». Voir :

M.W. v. Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] HCA 12; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 988].

Canada
Katsigiannis v. Kottick-Katsigianni (2001), 55 O.R. (3d) 456 (C.A.); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 758].

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 234] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 40] ;

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 37] ;

En l'espèce, il fut précisé qu'on pouvait admettre une procédure orale lorsque les témoignages et éléments de preuve écrite étaient contradictoires.

Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWCA Civ 1366, [2005] 1 FLR 727; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 771] ;

En l'espèce, la Cour d'appel décida que le juge du premier degré pouvait admettre d'office des preuves présentées oralement lorsqu'il estimait que cela aurait une influence sur l'issue de l'affaire.

Toutefois, le juge devait être convaincu d'une possibilité réelle d'application de l'exception de l'article 13(1) b) pour justifier la recherche de déclarations orales portant sur des preuves écrites quant à l'existence d'un risque grave de danger, qui n'était que sous-jacente dans les preuves écrites.

Re F. (Abduction: Child's Wishes) [2007] EWCA Civ 468, [2007] 2 FLR 697; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 906] ;

En l'espèce, la Cour d'appel affirma que lorsqu'un acquiescement est allégué, le recours à des preuves présentées oralement était plus communément autorisé car il est nécessaire de s'assurer de l'état d'esprit subjectif du demandeur, ainsi que de ses communications en réaction au déplacement ou au non-retour une fois qu'il en a connaissance. 

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 839].

Irlande
In the Matter of M. N. (A CHILD) [2008] IEHC 382; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 992].

Le juge indiqua que les demandes étaient traitées sur la base d'éléments de preuve écrite, sauf si un juge imposait ou permettait, dans des circonstances exceptionnelles, le recours à la preuve orale.

Nouvelle-Zélande
Secretary for Justice v. Abrahams, ex parte Brown; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 492] ;

Hall v. Hibbs [1995] NZFLR 762; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 248] ;

Afrique du Sud
Pennello v. Pennello [2003] 1 All SA 716; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 497] ;

Central Authority v. Houwert [2007] SCA 88 (RSA); [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 900].

En l'espèce la Cour suprême observa que même si le recours à des preuves présentées oralement n'a pas été requis par les parties, ce procédé pouvait s'imposer lorsque la cour ne parvient pas à établir autrement l'existence d'un consentement.

États-Unis d’Amérique
Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (Cal. App. 3d. Dist., 2005); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 797].

Pour un exemple d'étude concernant l'utilisation de preuves présentées oralement dans les affaires relevant de la Convention, voir : P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 257 et seq.

Les règles applicables aux enlèvements d'enfants dans le cadre de l'Union européenne uniquement (RÈGLEMENT (CE) No 2201/2003 Du Conseil (Bruxelles II bis)) impliquent que lors des demandes conventionnelles le demandeur doit être entendu pour qu'une décision de non-retour soit rendue (art. 11(5) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis), et que l'enfant en cause soit entendu « au cours de la procédure, à moins que cela n'apparaisse inapproprié eu égard à son âge ou à son degré de maturité. » (art. 11(2) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis).

Hechos

El menor, tenía 6 años y medio en la fecha del supuesto traslado ilícito. Él había vivido en Inglaterra toda su vida. Los padres estaban separados y la madre tenía la custodia física del menor.

El 23 de julio de 1997, una solicitud de la madre para reubicarse con el menor en Hong Kong fue rechazada por el Tribunal del Condado de Leicester (Leicester County Court).
 
El 6 de diciembre de 1997, la madre se llevó al menor a Hong Kong, su Estado de origen. El 24 de enero de 1998, la Autoridad Central de Hong Kong (Hong Kong Central Authority) inició los trámites de restitución.

Fallo

Restitución ordenada y compromisos ofrecidos; el traslado fue ilícito y no se cumplió con el requisito de que el menor enfrentaría un riesgo grave de daño físico en virtud del artículo 13(1)(b).

Fundamentos

Finalidad del Convenio - Preámbulo, arts. 1 y 2

El principio fundamental del Convenio es realizar la restitución inmediata de los menores sustraídos a su jurisdicción. El proceso es inmediato y la celeridad es de fundamental importancia. Absolutamente difiere de los procedimientos puramente internos preocupados por la toma de decisiones basadas en el principio de bienestar del menor.

Grave riesgo - art. 13(1)(b)

El riesgo de daño físico debe ser importante e implicar un daño substancial o severo y no trivial. Debe establecerse un alto grado de intolerabilidad de daño físico. El test es riguroso y solo será convincente en circunstancias excepcionales. La declaración de que el menor, que padecía una enfermedad respiratoria, enfrentaría un riesgo de daño al ser expuesto a los pavos en la granja familiar en Inglaterra fue rechazada

Compromisos

Se le ordenó al padre conseguir un informe de la enfermedad del menor y los pasos médicos a seguir, para suministrarle a la madre el informe médico, para solicitarle al Tribunal del Condado de Leicester (Leicester County Court) instrucciones sobre la residencia del menor y las medidas sanitarias necesarias, para realizar supervisión del menor, y para reunirse con los doctores de Hong Kong antes de su partida para el Reino Unido para discutir cualquier medida de protección que debería ser implementada en la granja.

Objeciones del niño a la restitución - art. 13(2)

El tribunal observó que en general un menor de seis años de edad era demasiado joven para que sus opiniones fuesen consideradas. Luego de entrevistar al menor el tribunal concluyó que el mismo no tenía la madurez suficiente. El tribunal aplicó el fallo del caso Australiano Emmett vs. Perry de que el momento relevante para la objeción del menor era el momento en el que se llevó a cabo el traslado. Sobre esa base, según la agenda del padre para diciembre 1997/ enero 1998, elección del menor hubiera probablemente sido ser restituido al Reino Unido.

Cuestiones procesales

El tribunal se negó a admitir la prueba oral. Observó que la prueba oral no era muy común en los casos del Convenio y debería ser permitida solo con moderación, caso contrario podría frustrar el propósito principal de celeridad.

Comentario INCADAT

El 13 de abril de 1998, un día antes de ser restituido al Reino Unido, el menor murió como consecuencia de una inyección letal aplicada por su madre. Acto seguido ella se suicidó.
 
La posición en el caso que nos ocupa y en el caso australiano Emmett v. Perry (1996) 92-645 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 280], con respecto al momento en el que las opiniones del menor deberían ser operativas no han sido adoptadas o consideradas en ninguna otra parte.

Objetivos del Convenio

Los órganos jurisdiccionales de todos los Estados contratantes deben inevitablemente referirse a los objetivos del Convenio y evaluarlos si pretenden comprender la finalidad del Convenio y contar con una guía sobre la manera de interpretar sus conceptos y aplicar sus disposiciones.

El Convenio de La Haya de 1980 sobre Sustracción de Menores comprende explícita e implícitamente una gran variedad de objetivos ―positivos y negativos―, ya que pretende establecer un equilibrio entre los distintos intereses de las partes principales: el menor, el padre privado del menor y el padre sustractor. Véanse, por ejemplo, las opiniones vertidas en la sentencia de la Corte Suprema de Canadá: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 17].

En el artículo 1 se identifican los objetivos principales, a saber, que la finalidad del Convenio consiste en lo siguiente:

"a) garantizar la restitución inmediata de los menores trasladados o retenidos de manera ilícita en cualquier Estado contratante;

b) velar por que los derechos de custodia y de visita vigentes en uno de los Estados contratantes se respeten en los demás Estados contratantes."

En el Preámbulo se brindan más detalles al respecto, en especial sobre el objetivo primordial de obtener la restitución del menor en los casos en que el traslado o la retención ha dado lugar a una violación de derechos de custodia ejercidos efectivamente. Reza lo siguiente:

"Los Estados signatarios del presente Convenio,

Profundamente convencidos de que los intereses del menor son de una importancia primordial para todas las cuestiones relativas a su custodia,

Deseosos de proteger al menor, en el plano internacional, de los efectos perjudiciales que podría ocasionarle un traslado o una retención ilícitos y de establecer los procedimientos que permitan garantizar la restitución inmediata del menor a un Estado en que tenga su residencia habitual, así como de asegurar la protección del derecho de visita".

El objetivo de restitución y la mejor manera de acometer su consecución se ven reforzados, asimismo, en los artículos que siguen, en especial en las obligaciones de las Autoridades Centrales (arts. 8 a 10), y en la exigencia que pesa sobre las autoridades judiciales de actuar con urgencia (art. 11).

El artículo 13, junto con los artículos 12(2) y 20, que contienen las excepciones al mecanismo de restitución inmediata, indican que el Convenio tiene otro objetivo más, a saber, que en ciertas circunstancias se puede tener en consideración la situación concreta del menor (en especial su interés superior) o incluso del padre sustractor.

El Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera dirige el foco de atención (en el párr. 19) a un objetivo no explícito sobre el que descansa el Convenio que consiste en que el debate respecto del fondo del derecho de custodia debería iniciarse ante las autoridades competentes del Estado en el que el menor tenía su residencia habitual antes del traslado. Véanse por ejemplo:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AR 362]

Finlandia
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 839]

Francia
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 214]

Países Bajos

X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NL 316]

Suiza
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986]

Reino Unido – Escocia

N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996]

Estados Unidos de América

Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 125]

El Informe Pérez-Vera también especifica la dimensión preventiva del objetivo de restitución del Convenio (en los párrs. 17, 18 y 25), objetivo que fue destacado durante el proceso de ratificación del Convenio en los Estados Unidos (véase: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)), que ha servido de fundamento para aplicar el Convenio en ese Estado contratante. Véase:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 741]

Se ha declarado que en los casos en que un menor sustraído ha sido mantenido oculto, la aplicación del principio de suspensión del plazo de prescripción derivado del sistema de equity (equitable tolling) es coherente con el objetivo del Convenio que consiste en prevenir la sustracción de menores.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 578]

A diferencia de otros tribunales federales de apelaciones, el Tribunal del Undécimo Circuito estaba listo para interpretar que un derecho de ne exeat comprende el derecho a determinar el lugar de residencia habitual del menor, dado que el objetivo del Convenio de La Haya consiste en prevenir la sustracción internacional y que el derecho de ne exeat atribuye al progenitor la facultad de decidir el país de residencia del menor.

En otros países, la prevención ha sido invocada a veces como un factor relevante para la interpretación y la aplicación del Convenio. Véanse por ejemplo:

Canadá
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 754]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 50]

Los fines y objetivos del Convenio también pueden adquirir prominencia durante la vigencia del instrumento, por ejemplo, la promoción de las visitas transfronterizas, que, según los argumentos que se han postulado, surge de una aplicación estricta del mecanismo de restitución inmediata del Convenio. Véanse:

Nueva Zelanda

S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 296]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 60]

No hay jerarquía entre los distintos objetivos del Convenio (párr. 18 del Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera). Por tanto, la interpretación de los tribunales puede variar de un Estado contratante a otro al adjudicar más o menos importancia a determinados objetivos. Asimismo, la doctrina puede evolucionar a nivel nacional o internacional.

En la jurisprudencia británica (Inglaterra y País de Gales), una decisión de la máxima instancia judicial de ese momento, la Cámara de los Lores, dio lugar a una revalorización de los objetivos del Convenio y, por consiguiente, a un cambio en la práctica de los tribunales con respecto a las excepciones:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]

Anteriormente, la voluntad de dar efecto al objetivo principal de promover el retorno y evitar que se recurra de forma abusiva a las excepciones había dado lugar a un nuevo criterio sobre el "carácter excepcional" de las circunstancias en el establecimiento de las excepciones. Véanse por ejemplo:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901]

Este criterio relativo al carácter excepcional de las circunstancias fue posteriormente declarado infundado por la Cámara de los Lores en el asunto Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937].

- Teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo (Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine):

En Estados Unidos la jurisprudencia ha optado por diferentes enfoques con respecto a los demandantes que no han respetado, o no habrían respetado, una resolución judicial dictada en aplicación de la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo.

En el asunto Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 150] se aplicó la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo, ya que el padre demandante había dejado los Estados Unidos para escapar de una condena penal y de otras responsabilidades ante los tribunales estadounidenses.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July25, 2000) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 326]

En este asunto el padre era un fugitivo. En segundo lugar, se podía sostener que había una conexión entre su estatus de fugitivo y la solicitud. Sin embargo, el tribunal declaró que la conexión no era lo suficientemente importante como para se pudiera aplicar la teoría. En todo caso, estimó que su aplicación impondría una sanción demasiado severa en un caso de derechos parentales.

En el asunto March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 386] no se aplicó la teoría en un caso en que el demandante no había respetado resoluciones civiles.

En un asunto en Canadá, Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 760], el estatus de fugitivo del padre fue declarado un factor a tener en cuenta, en el sentido de representar un riesgo grave para el menor.

Autor: Peter McEleavy

Alegación de comportamiento inadecuado/abuso sexual

Los tribunales han respondido de diferentes maneras al enfrentarse a alegaciones de que el padre privado del menor se ha comportado en forma inadecuada o ha abusado sexualmente de los menores víctimas de traslado o retención ilícitos. En los casos más claros, las acusaciones pueden simplemente desestimarse por resultar infundadas. Cuando ello no es posible, la opinión de los tribunales se ha dividido en cuanto a si una investigación exhaustiva debería llevarse a cabo en el Estado de refugio o si la evaluación pertinente debería efectuarse en el Estado de residencia habitual, conjuntamente con la adopción de medidas provisorias a fin de proteger al menor al momento de su restitución.

- Acusaciones desestimadas

Bélgica
Civ Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 706]

El padre afirmaba que la madre pretendía la restitución de la menor a fin de lograr que la declararan mentalmente incapaz y de vender sus órganos. El Tribunal resolvió, sin embargo, que si bien el padre era firme en sus acusaciones, ellas carecían de sustento probatorio.

Canadá (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 666]
 
El tribunal sostuvo que si la madre hubiera estado seriamente preocupada por su hijo, no lo habría dejado al cuidado del padre en vacaciones luego de lo que ella afirmaba había sido un incidente grave.

J.M. c. H.A., No500-04-046027-075 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 968]

La madre sostuvo que surgía un riesgo grave debido a que el padre era un predador sexual. El Tribunal destacó que dichas alegaciones habían sido rechazadas en procesos extranjeros. Del mismo modo, resaltaba que los procesos en aplicación del Convenio se ocupaban de la restitución del menor y no de la cuestión de la custodia. Se consideró que los temores de la madre y los abuelos maternos eran muy irracionales, y que se carecía de pruebas que acreditaran el accionar corrupto de las autoridades judiciales del Estado de residencia habitual. En cambio, el tribunal expresó su preocupación por los actos de los miembros de la familia materna (que había sustraído al menor a pesar de la existencia de tres órdenes judiciales en contrario), al igual que por el estado mental de la madre, quien había mantenido al menor en un estado de temor hacia el padre.

Francia
CA Amiens, 4 mars 1998, No de RG 5704759 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 704]

El Tribunal rechazó la alegación de violencia física contra el padre, que de haber existido, no era del nivel exigido para activar el artículo 13(1)(b).

Nueva Zelanda
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 303]

El Tribunal rechazó los argumentos de la madre según los cuales las supuestas prácticas sexuales del padre pondrían al menor en grave riesgo de daño. El Tribunal sostuvo que no había evidencia alguna de que la restitución expondría al menor al nivel de riesgo exigido para que activar la aplicación del artículo 13(1)(b).

Suiza
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (tribunal de apelaciones del cantón de Zurich), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [Referencia  INCADAT: HC/E/CH 426]

La madre alegó que el padre representaba un peligro para los menores, ya que, entre otras cosas, había abusado sexualmente de la hija. Al rechazar la acusación, el Tribunal destacó que la madre anteriormente había estado dispuesta a dejar a los menores al cuidado exclusivo del padre mientras ella viajaba al exterior.

Orden de restitución e investigación a llevarse a cabo en el Estado de residencia habitual

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 19]

El riesgo al que podía estar expuesta la hija debía investigarse en el marco del proceso de custodia en curso en Australia. Mientras tanto, la menor necesitaba protección. No obstante, tal protección no requería el rechazo de la solicitud de su restitución. El riesgo de daño físico que podía existir surgía del contacto permanente con el padre sin supervisión, y no de la restitución a Australia.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 361]

Se argumentó que las acusaciones de abuso sexual por parte del concubino de la madre eran de naturaleza tal como para activar la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b). Este argumento fue rechazado por el Tribunal. El Tribunal señaló que las autoridades suecas habían tomado conocimiento del caso y adoptado las medidas necesarias para asegurarse de que la menor estaría protegida desde el momento de su restitución: se la colocaría en un hogar de análisis con su madre. Si la madre no estuviera de acuerdo con esto, la menor quedaría bajo la guarda del Estado. El Tribunal también señaló que para ese momento la madre se había separado de su concubino.

Finlandia
Corte Suprema de Finlandia 1996:151, S96/2489 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 360]

Al considerar si las acusaciones de abuso sexual de una hija por parte de su padre constituían una barrera para la restitución de los menores, el Tribunal destacó que uno de los objetivos del Convenio de La Haya es que el foro para la determinación de cuestiones de custodia no ha de cambiarse a voluntad, y que la credibilidad de las alegaciones respecto de las características personales del demandante sea investigada más adecuadamente en el Estado de residencia habitual en común de los esposos. Asimismo, el Tribunal destacó que no surgía un grave riesgo de daño si la madre regresaba con los menores y procuraba que sus condiciones de vida se organizaran en aras de su interés superior. En consecuencia, el Tribunal determinó que no existía barrera alguna para la restitución de los menores.

Irlanda
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 389]

La Corte Suprema irlandesa aceptó que existían pruebas que demostraban, prima facie, el abuso sexual por parte del padre y que las menores no debían ser restituidas a su cuidado. Sin embargo, determinó que el juez de primera instancia se había equivocado al concluir que restituir a las menores a Inglaterra representaba un riesgo grave. A la luz de los compromisos otorgados por el padre, restituir a las menores para que vivieran en el hogar anterior del matrimonio bajo el cuidado exclusivo de la madre no las expondría a ningún riesgo grave.

- Investigación en el Estado de refugio

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HK 595]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones criticó el hecho de que la resolución de restitución había sido condicionada a los actos de una tercera parte (la Autoridad Central de Suiza) sobre la cual el tribunal de Hong Kong no tiene jurisdicción ni ejerce control. El Tribunal dictaminó que a menos que las declaraciones pudieran ser descartadas absolutamente, o que luego de la investigación dichas declaraciones no resultaran ser sustanciosas, era casi inconcebible que el tribunal de primera instancia, ejerciendo su discreción en forma razonable y responsable, decidiera restituir a la menor al ambiente en el cual el supuesto abuso había tenido lugar.

Estados Unidos de América
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. 2002) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 459]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones para el Primer Circuito resolvió que debía tenerse extremo cuidado antes de restituir al menor cuando existían pruebas contundentes de que había sido víctima de abuso sexual. Asimismo, afirmó que todo tribunal debería ser particularmente cauteloso acerca del uso de compromisos potencialmente inexigibles para intentar proteger a un menor en tales situaciones.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 971]

El Tribunal de Distrito había designado a una experta independiente en pediatría, abuso de menores, abuso sexual de menores y pornografía infantil a efectos de evaluar si las fotografías de los hijos constituían pornografía infantil y si los problemas de conducta que sufrían los menores eran signos de abuso sexual. La experta informó que no había pruebas que sugirieran que el padre fuera pedófilo, que le atrajeran sexualmente los menores o que las fotografías fueran pornográficas. Aprobó las investigaciones alemanas y afirmó que constituían evaluaciones precisas y que sus conclusiones eran congruentes con sus observaciones. Determinó que los síntomas que los niños mostraban eran congruentes con el estrés de sus vidas ocasionado por la áspera batalla por su custodia. Recomendó que los niños no fueran sometidos a más evaluaciones de abuso sexual, dado que ello incrementaría sus ya peligrosos niveles de estrés.

- Restitución denegada

Reino Unido - Escocia
Q., Petitioner [2001] SLT 243 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 341]

El Tribunal sostuvo que existía una posibilidad de que las acusaciones de abuso fueran ciertas. También era posible que se permitiera, si la menor era restituida, que estuviera en compañía del supuesto abusador sin supervisión. El Tribunal igualmente observó que un tribunal de otro Estado contratante del Convenio de La Haya podría proporcionar la protección adecuada. Por consiguiente, era posible que un menor fuera restituido cuando se había hecho una acusación de abuso sexual. Sin embargo, en función de los hechos del caso, el Tribunal decidió que, a la luz de lo que había sucedido en Francia durante el curso de las distintas actuaciones legales, los tribunales del lugar posiblemente no podían o no querían brindar la protección adecuada a los menores. Por lo tanto, la restitución de la niña implicaría un grave riesgo de exponerla a daño físico o psicológico, o bien someterla a una situación intolerable.

Estados Unidos de América
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 597]

Luego de pronunciarse por la existencia de abuso sexual, el Tribunal de Apelaciones resolvió que ello tornaba irrelevantes los argumentos del padre según los cuales los tribunales de Suecia podían adoptar medidas atenuantes a fin de impedir mayores daños luego de la restitución de los menores. El Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que, en dichas circunstancias, el artículo 13(1)(b) no requería la consideración por separado ni de los compromisos ni de las medidas que los tribunales del país de residencia habitual podrían adoptar.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Naturaleza y tenor de la oposición

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

La máxima instancia de Australia (la High Court) adoptó una interpretación literal del término "objeción". Sin embargo, una reforma legislativa cambió la interpretacion posteriormente. Véase:

Art. 111B(1B) de la Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975) incorporada por la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000).

El artículo 13(2), incorporado al derecho australiano mediante la reg. 16(3) de las Regulaciones de Derecho de Familia (Sustracción de Menores) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), establece en la actualidad no solo que el menor debe oponerse a la restitución, sino que la objeción debe demostrar un sentimiento fuerte más allá de la mera expresión de una preferencia o simples deseos.

Véanse, por ejemplo:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 904].

La cuestión acerca de si un menor debe plantear una objeción expresamente al Estado de residencia habitual no ha sido resuelta. Véase:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 8/10/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 549].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 546].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Canadá
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 1028].

Para probar que un menor se opone a la restitución, ha de demostrarse que el menor "expresó un fuerte desacuerdo a regresar al pais de su residencia habitual. Su oposición ha de ser categórica. No puede determinarse simplemente pesando las ventajas y desventajas de los dos Estados en cuestión, como en el caso del análisis de su interés superior. Debe tratarse de algo más fuerte que de una mera expresión de preferencia".


Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En el caso Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 87], el Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la restitución a la que un menor se opone debe ser una restitución inmediata al país del que fue ilícitamente sustraído. El artículo 13 no contiene disposición alguna que permita considerar si el menor se opone a la restitución en ciertas circunstancias.

En Re M. (A Minor)(Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 56], se aceptó, sin embargo, que una objeción a la vida con el progenitor solicitante puede distinguirse de una objeción a la vida en el país de origen previo.

En Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], Lord Justice Ward planteó una serie de preguntas a fin de ayudar a determinar si es adecuado tener en cuenta las objeciones de un menor.

Estas preguntas fueron respaldadas por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el marco del caso Re M. (A Child)(Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901].

Para comentarios académicos ver: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

Francia
Las objeciones basadas exclusivamente en una preferencia por la vida en Francia o la vida con el padre sustractor no fueron admitidas, ver:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. c. F. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 63].

Reino Unido - Escocia
En el caso Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs79], se adoptó una interpretación amplia. La Inner House of the Court of Session (tribunal de apelaciones) aceptó que una fuerte preferencia por permanecer con el padre sustractor y por la vida en Escocia implicaba una objeción a la restitución a los Estados Unidos de América.

En W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 805], la Inner House of the Court of Session, que aceptó el criterio inicial de Re T. [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], sostuvo que las objeciones relativas a cuestiones de bienestar debían ser tratadas exclusivamente por las autoridades del Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

En el posterior caso de primera instancia: M, Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith destacó la división en la jurisprudencia de apelación y decidió seguir la línea de autoridad previa ejemplificada en Urness v. Minto. Rechazó expresamente los criterios iniciales de Re T.

La jueza dejó asentado en su sentencia que habría habido un intento de impugnar la sentencia de la Inner House of the Court of Session en W. v. W. ante la Cámara de los Lores pero que el caso se había resuelto en forma amigable.

Más recientemente, se ha seguido un enfoque más estricto en cuanto a las objeciones, ver: C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]; ratificado en instancia de apelación: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996].

Suiza
El máximo tribunal suizo ha resaltado la importancia de que los menores sean capaces de distinguir entre las cuestiones vinculadas a la custodia y las cuestiones vinculadas a la restitución. Véanse:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 894].

La mera preferencia por la vida en el Estado de refugio, incluso motivada, no satisfará los términos del artículo 13(2):

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986].

Para comentarios académicos generales, véase: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia, 2008).

Reacción extrema a una orden de restitución

En determinadas ocasiones, la reacción de los menores ante la propuesta de restitución al Estado de residencia habitual excede la mera objeción y puede manifestarse como oposición física a la restitución o amenaza de suicidio. También ha habido ejemplos de padres sustractores que amenazan con suicidarse si se les obliga a regresar al Estado de la residencia habitual del menor.

Resistencia física

Existen varios ejemplos de casos en los que no se reunieron las opiniones de los menores en cuestión o estas no se tuvieron en mira en principio y, en consecuencia, los menores tomaron medidas para evitar que se ejecutara la orden de restitución. En cada uno de estos casos, la orden de restitución fue posteriormente anulada o rechazada. Véanse:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 56].

Los menores intentaron abrir la puerta del avión que los llevaba de regreso a Australia mientras éste carreteaba por el aeropuerto de Londres - Heathrow para el despegue.

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1998] 1 FLR 422, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 167].

La menor de dos hermanos, una niña de 12 años, se negó a abordar un avión que la llevaría de regreso a Dinamarca. Irónicamente, se habia ordenado la restitución del hermano mayor para asegurar que los hermanos no fueran separados.

Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 420].

Los menores atacaron a los funcionarios del tribunal que habían sido enviados para llevarlos al aeropuerto de Londres - Heathrow para que tomaran un vuelo de regreso a Nueva Zelanda.

Australia
Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections)
[2006] FamCA 685, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 864].

Un niño de 11 años se resistió a intentos de subirlo a un avión con destino a los Estados Unidos de América.


Amenazas de suicidio

Cuando se alega en el proceso que el menor o el padre sustractor se suicidarán si se les obliga a regresar, el tribunal que entiende en el caso debe determinar la veracidad de la afirmación a la luz de las pruebas disponibles y de las circunstancias del caso.

Por supuesto, esta cuestión no puede invocarse siempre, tal como sucedió en el caso de la Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong caratulado S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HK 234] en el que, luego de emitida la orden de restitución, la madre asesinó a su hijo y, posteriormente, se suicidó.


Amenazas de suicidio - Menor

En los siguientes casos, la presentación de pruebas de que el menor en cuestión había amenazado con suicidarse fue fundamental para la emisión de una orden de no restitución:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re R. (A Minor Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 105, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 59].

Israel
Las pruebas de que el menor había tenido previamente un intento de suicidio en el Estado de su residencia habitual fueron rechazadas para justificar una orden de no restitución en:

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L., [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 834].

La alegación de que un niño cometería suicidio no fue aceptada para justificar una orden de no restitución en:

B. v.  G., Supreme Court 8 April 2008, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 923].

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 213].


Amenazas de suicidio - Padre sustractor

Se afirmó que las pruebas de que un padre sustractor podía suicidarse si le obligaban a regresar al Estado de la residencia habitual del menor daban lugar a una situación en la que se expondría al menor involucrado a un grave riesgo de daño y que, por lo tanto, éste no debía ser restituido. Véanse:

Australia
J.L.M .v. Director-General NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 347];

Director-General, Department of Families v. RSP [2003] FamCA 623, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Enfermedad

Nueva Zelanda
Secretary for Justice v. C., ex parte H., 28/04/2000, transcript, District Court at Otahuhu, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 534].

La última entrevista, durante la cual el abogado del niño estuvo presente, terminó cuando el niño comenzó a sentirse mal y vomitó, cuando el juez mencionó la posibilidad de un regreso a Australia.

Compromisos

Preparación del análisis de jurisprudencia de INCADAT en curso.

Prueba presentada oralmente

Para garantizar que los casos tramitados con arreglo al Convenio sean tratados con celeridad, como lo exige el Convenio, los tribunales en varias jurisdicciones han restringido el uso de la prueba testimonial. Véanse:

Australia
Gazi v. Gazi (1993) FLC 92-341, 16 Fam LR 18, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 277]

Debe observarse, sin embargo, que más recientemente la máxima instancia de Australia, la High Court, ha advertido contra la "resolución inadecuada, aunque pronta, de solicitudes de restitución", en cambio se exije un "examen minucioso respecto de las pruebas adecuadas". Véase:

M.W. v. Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] HCA 12, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 988].

Canadá
Katsigiannis v. Kottick-Katsigianni (2001), 55 O.R. (3d) 456 (C.A.), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 758]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones de Ontario sostuvo que si la credibilidad era un problema serio, los tribunales debían considerar escuchar las declaraciones de los testigos cuya credibilidad estuviera cuestionada en un procedimiento oral.

China - Hong Kong
S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HK 234]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 40];

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 37].

En el caso anteriormente mencionado se aceptó que una situación en la que debería permitirse la prueba testimonial era aquella en la que la prueba documental se encontraba en conflicto directo.

Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWCA Civ 1366, [2005] 1 FLR 727, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 771];

En el caso anterior, el Tribunal de Apelación falló que un juez de primera instancia podría considerar de oficio el permitir la prueba testimonial cuando considerara que la prueba testimonial puede resultar determinante para el caso.

Sin embargo, para garantizar la exploración verbal respecto de la existencia de un grave riesgo de daño que era solo embrionario en la prueba escrita, un juez debía estar convencido de que existía una posibilidad realista de que la prueba testimonial configurara un caso del artículo 13(1)(b).

Re F. (Abduction: Child's Wishes) [2007] EWCA Civ 468, [2007] 2 FLR 697, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 906];

En este caso el Tribunal de Apelación afirmó que cuando se alegaba la excepción de aceptación posterior, se permitía de manera más general la prueba testimonial debido a la necesidad de asegurar el estado mental subjetivo del solicitante, así como también sus comunicaciones en respuesta al conocimiento del traslado o retención.

Finlandia
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 839].

Irlanda
In the Matter of M. N. (A Child) [2008] IEHC 382, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 992].

El juez de primera instancia observó que las solicitudes eran consideradas solo en relación a la prueba documental, excepto cuando el tribunal, en circunstancias excepcionales, ordenaba o permitía la prueba testimonial.

Nueva Zelanda
Secretary for Justice v. Abrahams, ex parte Brown, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 492];

Hall v. Hibbs [1995] NZFLR 762, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 248]

Sudáfrica
Pennello v. Pennello [2003] 1 All SA 716, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 497];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 900].

En el caso que antecede la Corte Suprema de Apelaciones observó que incluso cuando las partes no habían solicitado que se admitiera la prueba testimonial, esta se podría exigir cuando la cuestión del consentimiento no pudiera resolverse de otro modo. 

Estados Unidos de América
Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (Cal. App. 3d. Dist., 2005), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 797].

El padre argumentó que el juzgado de primera instancia le había negado una audiencia justa, dado que había determinado los asuntos de hecho en disputa sin escuchar la prueba testimonial de las partes.

El Tribunal de Apelaciones rechazó su planteo, destacando que nada en el Convenio de La Haya da al padre el derecho a una audiencia de prueba con declaración jurada de testigos. También destacó que, de conformidad con la legislación de California, los alegatos podían ser usados en lugar de la declaración testimonial en varias situaciones.

El Tribunal además estableció que el padre no podía cuestionar la procedencia del procedimiento utilizado con relación a la prueba en la apelación, porque no había objetado el uso de declaraciones juradas como prueba en el juicio.

Para la consideración del uso de la prueba testimonial en los procedimientos del Convenio, ver: Beaumont P.R. y McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 en p. 257 y ss.

En virtud de las normas aplicables en la Unión Europea para las sustracciones entre Estados de la UE (Reglamento del Consejo (CE) Nº 2201/2003 (Bruselas II bis)), las solicitudes en virtud del Convenio actualmente están sujetas a disposiciones adicionales, entre ellas el requisito de que se escuche al solicitante antes de denegar la restitución [artículo 11(5) Reglamento de Bruselas II bis], y, que se escuche al niño "durante el proceso, a menos que esto no se considere conveniente habida cuenta de su edad o grado de madurez' [artículo 11(2) Reglamento de Bruselas II bis].