CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 290

Court

Country

AUSTRALIA

Name

Full Court of the Family Court of Australia at Brisbane

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Ellis A.C.J., Kay and Chisholm JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

31 March 1999

Status

Final

Grounds

Consent - Art. 13(1)(a) | Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2) | Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a)

Order

Appeal dismissed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(a) 12(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

12(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
De L; The Director-General NSW Department of Community Services (1996) 20 Fam LR 390; (1996) FLC 92-706; Graziano and Daniels (1991) Fam LR 697; (1991) FLC 92-212; Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M and C and the Child Representative (1998) 24 Fam LR 178; (1998) FLC 92-829; State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746; Director General, Department of Community Services v. Apostolakis (1996) FLC 92-718; Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413; Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1.

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

General Issues
Discretionary Nature of Article 13
Acquiescence
Acquiescence
Settlement of the child
Settlement of the Child

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The children, two girls, were 4 and 3 at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. They had lived in both Australia and the United States. The parents married following the birth of the second child and had joint rights of custody in respect of both girls.

On 2 February 1995 the family moved to the United States. On 1 May 1997 the mother returned with the children to Australia, her State of origin. The father travelled to Australia three times to attempt a reconciliation. On 25 December 1997 he moved into the family home in Australia. On 19 March 1998 he returned to the United States.

On 22 September 1998 the Australian Central Authority filed an application for the return of the children. On 21 January 1999 the Family Court ordered the return of the children, finding they were not "settled" in their new environment within the meaning of Article 12(2). The mother appealed.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed, removal wrongful and return ordered; the standard required under Article 12(2) had not been met to show the children were settled in their new environment. The standard required had been met under Article 13(1)(a) to show that the father had acquiesced in the removal, however, the court exercised its discretion to make a return order.

Grounds

Consent - Art. 13(1)(a)

-

Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2)

The court considered the nature of the test to be applied to determine whether a child was "settled in his new environment". It rejected the approach previously adopted in Graziano v. Daniels (1991) FLC 92-212 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 259] and agreed with that accepted in Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 291].

The court stated that the approach endorsed in Graziano, namely that there must be a degree of settlement more than mere adjustment to surroundings, or that there is both a physical element and an emotional constituent of settlement, amounted to an unnecessary gloss on the legislation. The only test to be applied is whether the children have settled in their new environment. On the facts the court found that the mother had not established that the children were so settled.

Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a)

The father negotiated for over a year with the mother, even visiting her in Australia several times, in an attempt to persuade her to return with the children to the United States. Only after she took proceedings in Australia did he obtain legal advice and was told about the Convention.

The court did not disturb the finding by the trial judge that he had acquiesced. The court upheld the trial judge's exercise of discretion in ordering the return of the children. It held that it would not be contrary to the interests and welfare of the children to be returned to the United States. That being so, the policy of the Convention favoring return was held to be of particular significance.

INCADAT comment

The instant case represents a rare example of an Article 13(1)(a) exception being established but a return order nevertheless being made. For a further example see: Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 267].

Discretionary Nature of Article 13

The drafting of Article 13 makes clear that where one of the constituent exceptions is established to the standard required by the Convention, the making of a non-return order is not inevitable, rather the court seised of the return petition has a discretion whether or not to make a non-return order.

The most extensive recent overview of the exercise of the discretion to return in child abduction cases has come in the decision of the supreme United Kingdom jurisdiction, the House of Lords, in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].

In that case Baroness Hale affirmed that it would be wrong to import any test of exceptionality into the exercise of discretion under the Hague Convention. The circumstances in which a return might be refused were themselves exceptions to the general rule. It was neither necessary nor desirable to import an additional gloss into the Convention.

The manner in which the discretion would be exercised would differ depending on the facts of the case; general policy considerations, including not only the swift return of abducted children, but also comity between Contracting States, mutual respect for judicial processes and deterrence of abductions, had to be weighed against the interests of the child in the individual case. A court would be entitled to take into account the various aspects of the Convention policy, alongside the circumstances which gave the court a discretion in the first place and the wider considerations of the child's rights and welfare. Sometimes Convention objectives would be given more weight than the other considerations and sometimes they would not.

The discretionary nature of the exceptions is seen most commonly within the context of Article 13(2) - objections of a mature child - but there are equally examples of return orders being granted notwithstanding other exceptions being established.


Consent

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 995];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267].


Acquiescence

New Zealand
U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529 [INCADAT Cite: HC/E/NZ @472@].


Grave Risk

New Zealand
McL. v. McL., 12/04/2001, transcript, Family Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [INCADAT Cite: HC/E/NZ @538@].

It may be noted that in the English appeal Re D. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 AC 619 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ UKe @880@] Baroness Hale held that it was inconceivable that a child might be returned where a grave risk of harm was found to exist.

Acquiescence

There has been general acceptance that where the exception of acquiescence is concerned regard must be paid in the first instance to the subjective intentions of the left behind parent, see:

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 213];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 345];

Austria
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 981].

Considering the issue for the first time, Austria's supreme court held that acquiescence in a temporary state of affairs would not suffice for the purposes of Article 13(1) a), rather there had to be acquiescence in a durable change in habitual residence.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 545];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 851];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

In this case the House of Lords affirmed that acquiescence was not to be found in passing remarks or letters written by a parent who has recently suffered the trauma of the removal of his children.

Ireland
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

Israel
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 807];

New Zealand
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 533];

United Kingdom - Scotland
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 500];

South Africa
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 499];

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841].

In keeping with this approach there has also been a reluctance to find acquiescence where the applicant parent has sought initially to secure the voluntary return of the child or a reconciliation with the abducting parent, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [INCADAT cite:  HC/E/UKe 179];

Ireland
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

United States of America
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 84];

In the Australian case Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 290] negotiation over the course of 12 months was taken to amount to acquiescence but, notably, in the court's exercise of its discretion it decided to make a return order.

Settlement of the Child

A uniform interpretation has not emerged with regard to the concept of settlement; in particular whether it should be construed literally or rather in accordance with the policy objectives of the Convention.  In jurisdictions favouring the latter approach the burden of proof on the abducting parent is clearly greater and the exception is more difficult to establish.

Jurisdictions in which a heavy burden of proof has been attached to the establishment of settlement include:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 106]

In this case it was held that settlement is more than mere adjustment to surroundings. It involves a physical element of relating to, being established in, a community and an environment. It also has an emotional constituent denoting security and stability.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598]

For academic criticism of Re N. see:

Collins L. et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws, 14th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell, London, 2006, paragraph 19-121.

However, it may be noted that a more recent development in England has been the adoption of a child-centric assessment of settlement by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  This ruling may impact on the previous case law.

However there was no apparent weakening of the standard in the non-Convention case Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649,[INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 982].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107]

For Article 12(2) to be activated the interest of the child in not being uprooted must be so cogent that it outweighs the primary purpose of the Convention, namely the return of the child to the proper jurisdiction so that the child's future may be determined in the appropriate place.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 963]

A settled situation was one which could reasonably be relied upon to last as matters stood and did not contain indications that it was likely to change radically or to fall apart. There had therefore to be some projection into the future.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]

United States of America
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf  134]

A literal interpretation of the concept of settlement has been favoured in:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 291];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

The impact of the divergent interpretations is arguably most marked where very young children are concerned.

It has been held that settlement is to be considered from the perspective of a young child in:

Austria
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 378];

Australia
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 823];

State Central Authority v. C.R [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

Israel
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 938];

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/MC 510];

Switzerland
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (District Court of St. Gallen) (Switzerland), decision of 8 September 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 431].

A child-centric approach has also been adopted in several significant appellate decisions with regard to older children, with emphasis placed on the children's views.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

In contrast, a more objective assessment was favoured in the United States decision:

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S.2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 208]
The children, aged 3 and 1 1/2, had not established significant ties to their community in Brooklyn; they were not involved in school, extra-curricular, community, religious or social activities which children of an older age would be.

Faits

Les enfants, deux filles, étaient âgées de 4 et 3 ans à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Elles avaient vécu à la fois en Australie et aux Etats-Unis. Les parents s'étaient mariés après la naissance de leur deuxième enfant et en avaient la garde conjointe.

Le 2 février 1995, la famille s'installa aux Etats-Unis. le 1er mai 1997, la mère ramena les enfants en Australie, son Etat d'origine. Le père alla en Australie trois fois pour y tenter de se réconcilier avec la mère. Le 25 décembre 1997, il s'installa dans la maison familiale en Australie. Le 19 mars 1998, il retourna aux Etats-Unis.

Le 22 septembre 1998, l'Autorité Centrale australienne demanda le retour des enfants. Le 21 janvier 1999, le juge aux affaires familiales ordonna le retour des enfants, estimant qu'ils n'étaient pas intégrés à leur nouveau milieu au sens de l'article 12 alinéa 2. La mère interjeta appel.

Dispositif

L'appel a été rejeté ; déplacement de caractère illicite; retour ordonné ; les conditions posées par l'article 12 alinéa 2 pour montrer que les enfants étaient intégrés dans leur nouveau milieu n'étaient pas remplies. Les conditions requises par l'article 13 alinéa 1 a pour montrer que le père avait acquiescé qu déplacement étaient remplies, mais la cour usa de son pouvoir d'appréciation pour décider d'ordonner le retour.

Motifs

Consentement - art. 13(1)(a)

-

Intégration de l'enfant - art. 12(2)

La Cour s’interrogea sur la nature des conditions à remplir pour que l’enfant puisse être considéré comme intégré dans son nouveau milieu. Elle rejeta l’approche préalablement adoptée dans l’affaire Graziano v. Daniels (1991) FLC 92-212 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 259] et suivit celle de la décision Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 291]. La cour estima que l’approche privilégiée dans l’affaire Graziano, à savoir que l’intégration suppose davantage que l’adaptation au nouvel environnement, ou que l’intégration comporte à la fois un élément physique et un élément émotionnel, constituait un ajout superflu à la réglementation. La seule question à se poser est celle de savoir si les enfants se sont intégrés dans leur nouveau milieu. En l’espèce, la Cour considéra que la mère n’avait pas rapporté la preuve de ce que les enfants s’étaient intégrés dans leur nouveau milieu.

Acquiescement - art. 13(1)(a)

Le père négocia avec la mère plus d'un an, allant jusqu'à lui rendre visite en Australie plusieurs fois, afin de la persuader de rentrer aux Etats-Unis avec les enfants. C'est seulement après qu'elle eut entamé une procédure en Australie qu'il obtint une assistance juridique et entendit parler de la Convention.

La cour ne remit pas en cause la solution du premier juge qui avait conclu à l'acquiescement. Elle confirma l'exercice par le premier juge de son pouvoir d'appréciation le conduisant à ordonner le retour des enfants. Elle estima que leur retour aux Etats-Unis ne serait pas contraire à l'intérêt et au bien-être des enfants. Ceci étant, le système de la Convention, favorable au retour des enfants, fut considéré comme d'une importance particulière.

Intégration de l'enfant - art. 12(2)
La Cour s'interrogea sur la nature des conditions à remplir pour que l'enfant puisse être considéré comme intégré dans son nouveau milieu. Elle rejeta l'approche préalablement adoptée dans l'affaire Graziano v. Daniels (1991) FLC 92-212 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 259] et suivit celle de la décision Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 291].

La cour estima que l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Graziano, à savoir que l'intégration suppose davantage que l'adaptation au nouvel environnement, ou que l'intégration comporte à la fois un élément physique et un élément émotionnel, constituait un ajout superflu à la réglementation. La seule question à se poser est celle de savoir si les enfants se sont intégrés dans leur nouveau milieu. En l'espèce, la Cour considéra que la mère n'avait pas rapporté la preuve de ce que les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur nouveau milieu.

Commentaire INCADAT

L'espèce est une illustration d'un des rares exemples dans lesquels les conditions de l'article 13 alinéa 1 a étant remplies, la juridiction a néanmoins ordonné le retour des enfants. Pour un autre exemple, voy. : Re D. (Abduction : Discretionary return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 267].

Nature discrétionnaire de l'article 13

Selon les termes de l'article 13, il est clair que lorsque les conditions d'application d'une exception sont établies, le non-retour n'est pas forcément ordonné : le tribunal saisi de la demande de retour a un pouvoir discrétionnaire.

Ce pouvoir discrétionnaire a été étudié très en détail par une toute récente décision de la juridiction suprême britannique, la Chambre des Lords, dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Dans cette affaire, le juge Hale a affirmé qu'il convenait de rejeter toute mention d'exception lors de l'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire en vertu de la Convention de La Haye,  dans la mesure où les circonstances dans lesquelles le retour pourrait être refusé sont elles-mêmes des exceptions au principe général du retour. Le caractère exceptionnel étant donc inhérent au mécanisme; il n'était ni utile ni désirable d'importer une exigence supplémentaire.

Dans l'exercice de leur pouvoir discrétionnaire, il convenait pour les juges de prendre en compte, outre l'intérêt des enfants en cause, plusieurs principes généraux, l'objectif de retour immédiat des enfants enlevés mais également la courtoisie internationale, le respect mutuel pour les procédures menées dans les États contractants et l'importance de la prévention des enlèvements. Une juridiction pouvait tenir compte des divers principes sous-tendant la Convention, des circonstances de l'affaire et d'éléments liés aux droits et au bien-être de l'enfant. Dans certains cas, les principes conventionnels étaient amenés à primer, dans d'autres cas non.

La nature discrétionnaire des exceptions se rencontre le plus fréquemment dans le contexte de l'article 13(2) (opposition d'un enfant mûr), mais il existe également des exemples de demandes de retour auxquelles il a été fait droit nonobstant l'établissement d'exceptions supplémentaires.


Consentement

Australie
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 995] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 267].


Acquiescement

Nouvelle-Zélande
U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @472@].

Risque Grave

Nouvelle-Zélande
McL. v. McL., 12/04/2001, transcript, Family Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @538@].

Il convient de noter que dans l'arrêt de la cour d'appel anglaise Re D. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ UKe @880@] le juge Hale avait estimé qu'il était inconcevable d'ordonner le retour d'un enfant si un risque grave de danger était établi.

Acquiescement

On constate que la plupart des tribunaux considèrent que l'acquiescement se caractérise en premier lieu à partir de l'intention subjective du parent victime :

Australie
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @213@];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @345@];

Autriche
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT @981@].

Dans cette affaire la Cour suprême autrichienne, qui prenait position pour la première fois sur l'interprétation de la notion d'acquiescement, souligna que l'acquiescement à état de fait provisoire ne suffisait pas à faire jouer l'exception et que seul l'acquiescement à un changement durable de la résidence habituelle donnait lieu à une exception au retour au sens de l'article 13(1) a).

Belgique
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE @545@];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 851];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

En l'espèce la Chambre des Lords britannique décida que l'acquiescement ne pouvait se déduire de remarques passagères et de lettres écrites par un parent qui avait récemment subi le traumatisme de voir ses enfants lui être enlevés par l'autre parent. 

Irlande
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

Israël
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL @807@] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @533@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @500@];

Afrique du Sud
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @499@];

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@].

De la même manière, on remarque une réticence des juges à constater un acquiescement lorsque le parent avait essayé d'abord de parvenir à un retour volontaire de l'enfant ou à une réconciliation. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @179@ ];

Irlande
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @84@];

Dans l'affaire australienne Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @290@] des négociations d'une durée de 12 mois avaient été considérées comme établissant un acquiescement, mais la cour décida, dans le cadre de son pouvoir souverain d'appréciation, de ne pas ordonner le retour.

Intégration de l'enfant

La notion d'intégration ne fait pas encore l'objet d'une interprétation uniforme. La question se pose notamment de savoir si l'intégration doit s'entendre littéralement ou être interprétée à la lumière des objectifs de la Convention. Dans les États faisant prévaloir la deuxième alternative, la charge de la preuve est plus lourde pour le parent ravisseur et l'exception d'application plus rare.

Parmi les États les plus exigeants en ce qui concerne la preuve de l'intégration de l'enfant, on peut citer :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 106] ;
Dans cette espèce, il fut décidé que la notion d'intégration dépassait celle d'adaptation au nouveau milieu. L'intégration implique un élément de relation physique avec une communauté et un environnement. Elle contient un élément émotionnel traduisant la sécurité et la stabilité.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Pour un commentaire critique de Re N., voir :

L.Collins et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws: fourteenth edition, London, Sweet & Maxwell, 2006, para. 19 à 121.

Il convient toutefois de noter que plus récemment l'Angleterre a vu se développer une analyse de la notion d'intégration centrée sur l'enfant. On se réfèrera à la décision de la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. Cette décision pourrait remettre en cause la jurisprudence antérieure.

Toutefois cette décision n'a apparemment pas affaibli les exigences posées en la matière par la Common Law comme en témoigne Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 982].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Pour que l'article 12(2) trouve à s'appliquer, il faut que l'intérêt qu'a l'enfant à rester dans son nouveau milieu soit si fort qu'il dépasse l'objectif premier de la Convention selon lequel il appartient au juge du lieu de la résidence habituelle qu'avait l'enfant au moment de l'enlèvement de décider de l'avenir de celui-ci.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 963]

L'intégration existe dans les situations stables, dont on peut s'attendre qu'elles durent. Il convient d'opérer une certaine projection dans l'avenir.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962]

États-Unis d'Amérique
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf  134]

Une interprétation littérale du concept d'intégration a été préférée dans les États suivants :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 291];

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825]

L'impact de la différence d'interprétation est sans doute plus marqué lorsque ce sont des jeunes enfants qui sont en cause.

Il a été décidé que l'intégration doit s'apprécier du point de vue du jeune enfant en :

Autriche
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 378] ;

Australie
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 823] ;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824] ;

Israël
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 938] ;

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/MC 510] ;

Suisse
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (Cour cantonale de St. Gallen) (Suisse), décision du 8 Septembre 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 431].

Une approche centrée sur l'enfant a également été adoptée dans des décisions importantes rendues à propos d'enfants plus grands, l'accent étant mis sur l'opinion de l'enfant.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

En revanche, c'est une analyse plus objective de l'intégration qui a été préférée aux États-Unis d'Amérique :

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S. 2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 208];
Les enfants, âgés de 3 ans et 1 an ½ n'avaient pas établi de liens importants dans leur nouveau milieu de Brooklyn. Ils ne participaient pas aux activités scolaires, extrascolaires, religieuses, sociales ou communautaires auxquelles des enfants plus âgés se livrent.

Hechos

Las menores tenían 4 y 3 años a la fecha de la supuesta sustracción ilícita. Habían vivido tanto en Australia como en Estados Unidos. Los padres se casaron luego del nacimiento de la segunda niña y tenían derechos de custodia compartida respecto de ambas.

El 2 de febrero de 1995 la familia se mudó a Estados Unidos. El 1 de mayo de 1997 la madre regresó con las niñas a Australia, su Estado de origen. El padre viajó a Australia en tres oportunidades para intentar una reconciliación. El 25 de diciembre de 1997 se mudó al hogar familiar en Australia. El 19 de marzo de 1998 regresó a los Estados Unidos.

El 22 de septiembre de 1998 la Autoridad Central de Australia presentó una solicitud para la restitución de las menores. El 21 de enero de 1999 el Tribunal de Familia ordenó la restitución de las niñas, entendiendo que no se encontraban "establecidas" en su nuevo ambiente según los términos del artículo 12(2). La madre apeló.

Fallo

Apelación rechazada, sustracción ilícita y restitución ordenada; no se alcanzó el estándar requerido por el artículo 12 (2) para demostrar que las menores se encontraban establecidas en su nuevo ambiente. Se alcanzó el estándar requerido por el artículo 13 (1)(a) para demostrar que hubo aceptación posterior del traslado por parte del padre, sin embargo, el tribunal ejerció su discrecionalidad al ordenar la restitución.

Fundamentos

Consentimiento - art. 13(1)(a)

-

Integración del niño - art. 12(2)

El tribunal consideró la naturaleza del examen a aplicarse para determinar si un menor se encontraba 'establecido en su nuevo ambiente'. Rechazó el enfoque adoptado anteriormente en Graziano v. Daniels (1991) FLC 92-212 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 259] y estuvo de acuerdo con el aceptado en Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 291]. El tribunal determinó que el enfoque adoptado en Graziano, es decir, que debe existir un grado de establecimiento más que un mero acomodamiento a los alrededores, o que exista tanto un elemento físico como un componente emocional de establecimiento, implicaba un comentario innecesario en la legislación. El único examen a aplicarse es si los menores se han establecido en su nuevo ambiente. En cuanto a los hechos, el tribunal entendió que la madre no había demostrado que las niñas se encontraran así establecidas.

Aceptación posterior - art. 13(1)(a)

-

Comentario INCADAT

El presente caso representa un raro ejemplo en el que se establece una excepción al artículo 13 (1)(a), pero en el que sin embargo se ordena la restitución. Para más ejemplos, véase: Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 267].

Carácter discrecional del artículo 13

La redacción del artículo 13 deja en claro que cuando se encuentra configurada una de las excepciones previstas en el Convenio, el dictado de una orden de no restitución no es inevitable; por el contrario, el tribunal que conoce de la solicitud de restitución tiene la facultad discrecial para pronunciar o no una orden de restitución.

El estudio reciente más amplio del ejercicio de la discreción en cuanto a ordenar la restitución en casos de sustracción de menores ha surgido de la decisión de la jurisdicción suprema del Reino Unido, la Cámara de los Lores, en Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937].

En ese caso, la Baronesa Hale afirmó que convenía no incluir mencion de circunstancias excepcionales en cuanto al ejercicio de discreción en la aplicación del Convenio de La Haya. Las circunstancias en las cuales se podría denegar una restitución eran en sí mismas excepciones a la regla general. No era necesario ni deseable importar una exigencia adicional al Convenio.

La manera en la cual se ejercería la discreción diferiría dependiendo de los hechos del caso; las consideraciones de política general —entre ellas no solo la pronta restitución de los menores sustraídos, sino también la cortesía entre los Estados contratantes, el respeto mutuo por los procesos judiciales y la disuasión para no cometer sustracciones— tendrían que ser ponderadas con respecto al interés del menor en cada caso. Un tribunal estaría facultado para tener en cuenta los diversos aspectos de la política del Convenio, junto con las circunstancias que le dieron al tribunal una discreción en primer lugar y las consideraciones más amplias de los derechos y el bienestar del menor. Algunas veces se le daría más peso a los objetivos del Convenio que a las otras consideraciones y otras veces no.

El carácter discrecional de las excepciones se ve más comúnmente en el contexto del artículo 13(2) (objeciones de un menor maduro), pero hay igualmente ejemplos de órdenes de restitución otorgadas a pesar de haberse configurado otras excepciones.

Consentimiento

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 995

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 267]

Aceptación posterior

Nueva Zelanda
U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ @472@].

Riesgo Grave

Nueva Zelanda
McL. v. McL., 12/04/2001, transcript, Family Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ @538@]

Puede observarse que en la apelación inglesa Re D. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 AC 619 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ UKe @880@], la Baronesa Hale sostuvo que era inconcebible que se pudiera restituir a un menor cuando se establece la existencia de un riesgo grave.

Aceptación posterior

Se ha aceptado en forma generalizada que en lo que respecta a la excepción de aceptación posterior, en primera instancia, debe prestarse atención a las intenciones subjetivas del padre privado del menor. Véanse:

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 213];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian, PT 1767 of 2001 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 345];

Austria
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (tribunal supremo de Austria) 1/4/2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT @981@]

Al considerar la cuestión por primera vez, el tribunal supremo de Austria resolvió que la aceptación posterior con respecto a un estado de situación temporario no sería suficiente a efectos del artículo 13(1) a), sino que, en el caso de un cambio permanente de residencia habitual, debía existir aceptación posterior.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 545];

Canadá
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 851];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 46];

En este caso, la Cámara de los Lores sostuvo que no podía deducirse que había habido aceptación posterior por comentarios pasajeros o cartas escritas por un padre que recientemente había sufrido el trauma inherente a la sustracción de sus hijos.

Irlanda
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 285];

Israel
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 807]

Nueva Zelanda
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 533];

Reino Unido - Escocia
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 500]

Sudáfrica
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 499];

Suiza
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

En concordancia con este enfoque, ha habido reticencia a pronunciarse en favor de la existencia de aceptación posterior cuando el padre solicitante ha pretendido en un principio obtener la restitución voluntaria del menor o lograr reconciliarse con el sustractor. Véanse:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 46];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [Referencia INCADAT:  HC/E/UKe 179] ;

Irlanda
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 285];

Estados Unidos de América
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 84];

En el caso australiano Townsend y Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 290], se interpretó que la negociación durante 12 meses equivalía a aceptación posterior. Sin embargo, cabe destacar que, en ejercicio de su discrecionalidad, el tribunal decidió expedir una orden de restitución.

Integración del niño

No ha surgido interpretación uniforme alguna relativa al concepto de integración; en particular si debería interpretarse literalmente o, en cambio, de conformidad con los objetivos del Convenio. En las jurisdicciones que favorecen el último enfoque, la carga de la prueba que incumbe al sustractor es claramente mayor y es más difícil establecer la configuración de la excepción.

Entre las jurisdicciones en las cuales se le ha atribuido una carga de la prueba importante al establecimiento de la integración se encuentran las siguientes:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 106].

En este caso se sostuvo que la integración es mucho más que la mera adaptación al entorno. Implica un elemento físico de estar relacionado con una comunidad y un entorno y de estar establecido en ellos. También tiene un componente emocional que denota seguridad y estabilidad.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 598].

Para la crítica académica de Re N., ver:

Collins L. et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws, 14th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell, Londres, 2006, párrafos 19-121.

Sin embargo, se puede observar que un avance más reciente en Inglaterra ha sido la adopción por parte de la Cámara de los Lores de una evaluación de la integración centrada en el menor en Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]. Este fallo puede afectar la jurisprudencia anterior.

No obstante ello, no hubo ningún debilitamiento aparente de este criterio en el caso no regulado por el Convenio Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 982].

Reino Unido - Escocia
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 107]

Para que se active el artículo 12(2), el interés en que el menor no sea desarraigado debe ser tan convincente de manera de que tenga más peso que el objeto primario del Convenio, a saber, la restitución del menor a la jurisdicción adecuada para que su futuro sea determinado en el lugar adecuado.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 963]

Una situación de integración es una situación en cuya permanencia puede confiarse de manera razonable en las circunstancias del caso y sobre la que no existen indicaciones de cambio radical o derrumbe. Por lo tanto, tiene que existir alguna proyección hacia el futuro.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, 2008 S.C.L.R. 329, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]

Estados Unidos de América
Re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf  134].

Se favoreció una interpretación literal del concepto de integración en:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 291]

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/HK 825].

El impacto de las interpretaciones divergentes es discutiblemente más marcado cuando se encuentran afectados menores muy pequeños.

Se ha sostenido que se debe considerar la integración desde la perspectiva de un menor pequeño en:

Austria
7Ob573/90, Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AT 378];

Australia
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 823];

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 824];

Israel
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/IL 938];

Mónaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général c. M. H. K., [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/MC 510];

Suiza
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (District Court of St. Gallen) (Switzerland), decision of 8 September 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 431].

También se ha adoptado un enfoque centrado en el menor en varias decisiones significativas adoptadas en instancia de apelación con respecto a menores de mayor edad, con el énfasis puesto en las opiniones del menor.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937];

Francia
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 814];

Canadá (Quebec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 653].

En contraste, en la decisión de los Estados Unidos se favoreció una evaluación más objetiva:

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S.2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USs 208].

Los menores, de tres y un año y medio de edad, no habían establecido lazos significativos con su comunidad en Brooklyn; no estaban involucrados en actividades escolares, extracurriculares, comunitarias, religiosas ni sociales en las que se verían involucrados menores de mayor edad.