CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829; (1998) 24 Fam LR 178

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 291

Court

Country

AUSTRALIA

Name

Full Court of the Family Court of Australia at Sydney

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Nicholson C.J., Holden and Dessau JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

POLAND

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

24 December 1998

Status

Final

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2) | Procedural Matters

Order

Appeal dismissed, return refused

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(b) 13(2) 12(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

12(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
De L. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (1996) 20 Fam LR 399; Graziano and Daniels (1991) FLC 92-212; State Central Authority and Ayob (1997) Fam LR 567; Fogwell and Ashton (1993) 17 Fam LR 94; Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413; Director General of the Department of Community Services and Apostolakis (1997) 21 Fam LR 1; Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1.

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Australian and New Zealand Case Law
Settlement of the child
Settlement of the Child
Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The children, a girl and a boy, were nearly 9 and 7 3/4 respectively at the date of the alleged wrongful retention. They had lived in Poland all of their lives. The parents were separated.

The mother had custody and the father access. It was alleged that the father had sexually abused both children. On 20 November 1995 the children travelled to Australia to stay with the maternal grandmother for a period of six months. The mother travelled to Australia shortly thereafter but was only able to obtain a three month visa. The grandmother did not return the children as arranged on 1 September 1996.

The mother attempted to secure the return of the children but was unaware of the Hague Convention. The grandmother refused to send the children back, even when tickets were purchased for them. The mother discovered in February 1997 that her daughter had been sexually abused by the grandmother's then husband. On 12 September 1998 the mother obtained a visa and travelled to Australia.

The grandmother still refused to allow the children to return to Poland. On 24 September 1998 the grandmother obtained an ex-parte order prohibiting the mother from removing the children from Australia. The mother, still unaware of the Convention, instituted proceedings for residence.

On 25 November the Central Authority applied for the return of the children. On 1 December the Family Court refused to order the return of the children, finding that the children were settled in Australia and that they objected to being returned to Poland. The Central Authority appealed.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed. Retention wrongful but return refused; the standard required under Article 12(2) had been reached to show the children were settled in their new environment.

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The trial judge correctly applied the objective test required by Regulation 16(3)(b) in finding that there would not be a grave risk of harm. However, in exercising his discretion he was entitled to take account of the children's fears and concerns about a return and to conclude that a return may cause the children permanent psychological damage, particularly as it would involve their separation from their maternal grandmother.

Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2)

The word "settled" as it appears in Regulation 16 of the Family Law (Child Abduction Convention) Regulations, which implements the Convention into Australian law, is to be given its ordinary meaning. The more restrictive interpretation adopted in Graziano v. Daniels (1991) FLC 92-212 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 259] is not to be followed. In the instant case the court found that the children had made a remarkable adjustment to life in Australia. They had lived there for nearly three years, were settled in school, had a command of the English language and were living in a settled and loving environment with their grandmother. The fact the children still needed abuse counseling did not mean they were not settled in their new environment within the meaning of the Regulations. A person can be settled into an environment and still experience severe problems. The court noted that the trial judge was entitled to take the children's statements into consideration in determining their degree of settlement. Settlement is to be considered at the time of the application being made or at the time of trial. English authorities suggesting that a court must look to the future to determine whether children are "settled" and consider their "long term settled position" do not represent the law so far as the Australian Regulations are concerned. On this basis the doubts surrounding the children's immigration status did not change their settled position in Australia. Finally, the court stated it was not necessarily persuaded that a finding that a child is settled in its new environment removes the discretion to make a return order in any event.

Procedural Matters

The court noted that the Convention proceedings are summary in nature and must be decided quickly. Consequently, a trial judge is not required to exhaustively deal with each issue that has been raised and the fact that he does not do so cannot be taken as leading to a conclusion that the issue has been overlooked.

INCADAT comment

Australian and New Zealand Case Law

Australia
In Australia a very strict approach was adopted initially with regard to Article 13(1) b), see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @294@];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @293@].

However, following the judgment of the High Court in the joint appeals:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @346@, @347@], where a literal interpretation of the exception was advocated, greater attention has now been focused on the risk to the child and the post return situation. 

In the context of a primary carer abducting parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence, see:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @544@].

With regard to a child facing a grave risk of psychological harm see:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 871].

For recent examples of cases where the grave risk of harm exception was rejected see:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @782@].

New Zealand
Appellate authority initially indicated that the change in emphasis adopted in Australia with regard to Article 13(1) b) would be followed in New Zealand also, see:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 495].

However, in the more recent decision: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770] the High Court of New Zealand (Auckland) has affirmed, albeit obiter, that the binding interpretation in New Zealand remained the strict interpretation given by the Court of Appeal in:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 90].

Settlement of the Child

A uniform interpretation has not emerged with regard to the concept of settlement; in particular whether it should be construed literally or rather in accordance with the policy objectives of the Convention.  In jurisdictions favouring the latter approach the burden of proof on the abducting parent is clearly greater and the exception is more difficult to establish.

Jurisdictions in which a heavy burden of proof has been attached to the establishment of settlement include:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 106]

In this case it was held that settlement is more than mere adjustment to surroundings. It involves a physical element of relating to, being established in, a community and an environment. It also has an emotional constituent denoting security and stability.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598]

For academic criticism of Re N. see:

Collins L. et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws, 14th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell, London, 2006, paragraph 19-121.

However, it may be noted that a more recent development in England has been the adoption of a child-centric assessment of settlement by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  This ruling may impact on the previous case law.

However there was no apparent weakening of the standard in the non-Convention case Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649,[INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 982].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107]

For Article 12(2) to be activated the interest of the child in not being uprooted must be so cogent that it outweighs the primary purpose of the Convention, namely the return of the child to the proper jurisdiction so that the child's future may be determined in the appropriate place.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 963]

A settled situation was one which could reasonably be relied upon to last as matters stood and did not contain indications that it was likely to change radically or to fall apart. There had therefore to be some projection into the future.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]

United States of America
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf  134]

A literal interpretation of the concept of settlement has been favoured in:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 291];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

The impact of the divergent interpretations is arguably most marked where very young children are concerned.

It has been held that settlement is to be considered from the perspective of a young child in:

Austria
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 378];

Australia
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 823];

State Central Authority v. C.R [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

Israel
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 938];

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/MC 510];

Switzerland
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (District Court of St. Gallen) (Switzerland), decision of 8 September 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 431].

A child-centric approach has also been adopted in several significant appellate decisions with regard to older children, with emphasis placed on the children's views.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

In contrast, a more objective assessment was favoured in the United States decision:

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S.2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 208]
The children, aged 3 and 1 1/2, had not established significant ties to their community in Brooklyn; they were not involved in school, extra-curricular, community, religious or social activities which children of an older age would be.

Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

Unlike the Article 13 exceptions, Article 12(2) does not expressly afford courts a discretion to make a return order if settlement is established.  Where this issue has arisen for consideration the majority judicial view has nevertheless been to apply the provision as if a discretion does exist, but this has arisen in different ways.

Australia
The matter has not been conclusively decided but there would appear to be appellate support for inferring a discretion, reference has been made to English and Scottish case law, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 276].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
English case law initially favoured inferring that a Convention based discretion existed by virtue of Article 18, see:

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598].

However, this interpretation was expressly rejected in the House of Lords decision Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  A majority of the panel held that the construction of Article 12(2) left the matter open that there was an inherent discretion where settlement was established.  It was pointed out that Article 18 did not confer any new power to order the return of a child under the Convention, rather it contemplated powers conferred by domestic law.

Ireland
In accepting the existence of a discretion reference was made to early English authority and Article 18.

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 391].

New Zealand
A discretion derives from the domestic legislation implementing the Convention, see:

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 882].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Whilst the matter was not explored in any detail, settlement not being established, there was a suggestion that a discretion would exist, with reference being made to Article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107].

There have been a few decisions in which no discretion was found to attach to Article 12(2), these include:

Australia
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232], - subsequently questioned;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 596] - subsequently overruled;

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

Article 18 not being included in the act implementing the Convention in Quebec, it is understood that courts do not possess a discretionary power where settlement is established.

For academic commentary on the use of discretion where settlement is established, see:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 204 et seq.;

R. Schuz, ‘In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Article 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly.

Faits

Les enfants, une fille et un garçon, étaient respectivement âgés de 9 et 7 as 3/4 à la date du non-retour dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Ils avaient passé toute leur vie en Pologne. Les parents étaient séparés.

La mère avait la garde et le père un droit de visite. Il était allégué que le père avait abusé sexuellement des deux enfants. Le 20 novembre 1995, les enfants allèrent en Australie pour y demeurer six mois avec leur grand-mère maternelle. La mère partit peu après en Australie, mais ne put obtenir qu'un visa de trois mois. La grand-mère ne renvoya pas les enfants comme convenu le 1er septembre 1996.

La mère essaya d'obtenir le retour des enfants mais n'avait pas connaissance de la Convention de La Haye. La grand-mère refusa de renvoyer les enfants même lorsque leurs tickets furent achetés. En février 1997, la mère découvrit que sa fille avait fait l'objet d'abus sexuels de la part de l'actuel mari de la grand-mère. Le 12 septembre 1998, la mère obtint un visa et alla en Australie.

La grand-mère maintint son refus de renvoyer les enfants en Pologne. Le 24 septembre 1998, la grand-mère obtint une décision non contradictoire interdisant à la mère d'emmener les enfants hors du territoire australien. La mère, toujours inconsciente de la Convention de La haye, entama une procédure tendant à la garde des enfants.

Le 25 novembre, l'Autorité Centrale demanda le retour des enfants. Le 1er décembre, le juge aux affaires familiales refusa d'ordonner le retour des enfants, estimant qu'ils s'étaient intégrés en Australie et qu'ils s'opposaient à leur retour en Pologne. L'Autorité Centrale interjeta appel.

Dispositif

L'appel a été rejeté.  Non-retour illicite mais le retour refusé ; les enfants s'étaient intégrés à leur nouveau milieu au sens de l'article 12 alinéa 2.

Motifs

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

Le premier juge avait correctement appliqué les exigences du règlement 16(3) (b) et conclu à bon droit à l’absence de grave risque de danger. Toutefois, dans l’exercice de son pouvoir d’appréciation, il avait pu tirer les conséquences de la peur et de l’inquiétude que suscitait le retour chez les enfants et décider que le retour des enfants conduirait à un préjudice psychologique permanent, notamment du fait de leur séparation de leur grand-mère maternelle.

Intégration de l'enfant - art. 12(2)

Le terme “intégré” tel qu’il résulte du règlement 16(3)(b) du règlement de droit de la famille qui met en œuvre la Convention de La Haye en droit australien doit être compris dans son sens ordinaire. L’interprétation plus restrictive privilégiée dans Graziano v. Daniels (1991) FLC 92-212 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 259] ne devait selon la Cour par être suivie. En l’espèce, la Cour estima que les enfants s’étaient remarquablement adapté à leur vie en Australie. Ils y résidaient depuis presque trois ans, y étaient scolarisés, maîtrisaient la langue anglaise et vivaient dans un environnement sable et aimant avec leur grand-mère. Le fait que les enfants avaient encore besoin d’un traitement psychologique suite aux abus qu’ils avaient subis ne signifiait pas qu’ils n’étaient pas intégrés dans leur nouveau milieu au sens du règlement. Une personne peut traverser une période difficile, mais être intégrée dans son milieu. La cour estima que le premier juge avait pu à bon droit entendre les enfants afin de déterminer à quel point ils étaient intégrés à leur nouveau milieu. L’intégration doit être appréciée à la date de la demande ou à la date de l’audience. Les auteurs anglais selon lesquels un juge doit rechercher l’avenir pour déterminer si les enfants sont intégrés et s’interroger sur leur “intégration à long terme” ne respectent pas les termes de la loi australienne. De la sorte, les inquiétudes liées au statut des enfants face à la loi sur l’immigration était sans influence sur leur intégration en Australie. En définitive, la Cour décida qu’il n’était pas certain que le fait que l’enfant était intégré dans son nouvel environnement ôtait à la juridiction son pouvoir d’ordonner le retour.

Questions procédurales

La cour remarqua que la procédure conventionnelle est par essence sommaire et faire l’objet d’un traitement diligent. En conséquence, le juge n’est pas tenu de statuer sur chaque question soulevée de manière exhaustive et qu’on ne peut déduire de ce fait que la question a été méconnue.

Commentaire INCADAT

Jurisprudence australienne et néo-zélandaise

Australie
En Australie une interprétation très stricte prévalait dans la jurisprudence ancienne rendue sur le fondement de l'article 13(1) b). Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @293@].

Toutefois, à la suite du jugement prononcé par la Court suprême Australienne dans les appels joints de:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority ; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401 ; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 346, 347], dans lesquels une interprétation littérale a été adoptée, l'attention se tourne désormais sur le risque encouru par l'enfant et la situation à laquelle il sera confronté après le retour.

Pour une décision rendue dans une situation où le parent ravisseur, ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, refuse de rentrer dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant avec ce dernier, voir :

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 544].

Pour un exemple de situation dans laquelle l'enfant est exposé à un risque grave de danger psychique, voir:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 871].

Pour des exemples d'affaires récentes dans lesquelles l'exception de risque grave a été rejetée, voir :

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 782].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Des décisions d'appel avaient initialement laissé entendre que le revirement de jurisprudence australien serait également suivi en Nouvelle-Zélande, voir :

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 495].

Toutefois, la décision récente de la Cour d'appel (Auckland) (Nouvelle-Zélande),:K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770], a réaffirmé (quoique dans obiter dictum) que l'interprétation qu'il convenait de suivre en Nouvelle-Zélande restait l'interprétation stricte donnée par la Cour d'appel dans :

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 90].

Intégration de l'enfant

La notion d'intégration ne fait pas encore l'objet d'une interprétation uniforme. La question se pose notamment de savoir si l'intégration doit s'entendre littéralement ou être interprétée à la lumière des objectifs de la Convention. Dans les États faisant prévaloir la deuxième alternative, la charge de la preuve est plus lourde pour le parent ravisseur et l'exception d'application plus rare.

Parmi les États les plus exigeants en ce qui concerne la preuve de l'intégration de l'enfant, on peut citer :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 106] ;
Dans cette espèce, il fut décidé que la notion d'intégration dépassait celle d'adaptation au nouveau milieu. L'intégration implique un élément de relation physique avec une communauté et un environnement. Elle contient un élément émotionnel traduisant la sécurité et la stabilité.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Pour un commentaire critique de Re N., voir :

L.Collins et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws: fourteenth edition, London, Sweet & Maxwell, 2006, para. 19 à 121.

Il convient toutefois de noter que plus récemment l'Angleterre a vu se développer une analyse de la notion d'intégration centrée sur l'enfant. On se réfèrera à la décision de la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. Cette décision pourrait remettre en cause la jurisprudence antérieure.

Toutefois cette décision n'a apparemment pas affaibli les exigences posées en la matière par la Common Law comme en témoigne Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 982].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Pour que l'article 12(2) trouve à s'appliquer, il faut que l'intérêt qu'a l'enfant à rester dans son nouveau milieu soit si fort qu'il dépasse l'objectif premier de la Convention selon lequel il appartient au juge du lieu de la résidence habituelle qu'avait l'enfant au moment de l'enlèvement de décider de l'avenir de celui-ci.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 963]

L'intégration existe dans les situations stables, dont on peut s'attendre qu'elles durent. Il convient d'opérer une certaine projection dans l'avenir.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962]

États-Unis d'Amérique
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf  134]

Une interprétation littérale du concept d'intégration a été préférée dans les États suivants :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 291];

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825]

L'impact de la différence d'interprétation est sans doute plus marqué lorsque ce sont des jeunes enfants qui sont en cause.

Il a été décidé que l'intégration doit s'apprécier du point de vue du jeune enfant en :

Autriche
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 378] ;

Australie
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 823] ;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824] ;

Israël
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 938] ;

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/MC 510] ;

Suisse
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (Cour cantonale de St. Gallen) (Suisse), décision du 8 Septembre 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 431].

Une approche centrée sur l'enfant a également été adoptée dans des décisions importantes rendues à propos d'enfants plus grands, l'accent étant mis sur l'opinion de l'enfant.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

En revanche, c'est une analyse plus objective de l'intégration qui a été préférée aux États-Unis d'Amérique :

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S. 2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 208];
Les enfants, âgés de 3 ans et 1 an ½ n'avaient pas établi de liens importants dans leur nouveau milieu de Brooklyn. Ils ne participaient pas aux activités scolaires, extrascolaires, religieuses, sociales ou communautaires auxquelles des enfants plus âgés se livrent.

Pouvoir d'ordonner le retour nonobstant l'intégration

Au contraire de l'exception de l'article 13, l'article 12(2) ne prévoit pas expressément la possibilité pour les juridictions saisies de la demande de retour de disposer d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour ordonner le retour en cas d'intégration. Lorsque la question s'est posée, il apparaît néanmoins que les cours ont majoritairement  admis le caractère discrétionnaire de l'application de cette disposition.  La question s'est toutefois posée en des termes très variables :

Australie
La question n'a pas été définitivement résolue mais il semble que la Cour d'appel a sous-entendu le caractère discrétionnaire de l'article 12(2), référence faite à la jurisprudence anglaise et écossaise. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 276].

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
La jurisprudence anglaise déduisait l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire de l'article 18, voir :

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Toutefois cette interprétation a été expressément rejetée par la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. La majorité des juges estima que l'article 12(2) laissait ouverte la question de savoir si le retour pouvait discrétionnairement être ordonné nonobstant l'intégration. Les juges soulignèrent que l'article 18 ne donne pas un nouveau pouvoir d'ordonner le retour d'un enfant mais se réfère simplement à un pouvoir préexistant en droit interne.

Irlande
Il a été fait référence à la jurisprudence ancienne anglaise et à l'article 18 pour justifier l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire :

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 391];

Nouvelle-Zélande
En Nouvelle-Zélande, le pouvoir discrétionnaire est prévu par la législation de mise en œuvre de la Convention. Voir :

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J.) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 882]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Quoique la question n'ait pas été envisagée en détail puisqu'en l'espèce il n'y avait pas eu intégration, il fut suggéré que l'application de l'exception avait un caractère discrétionnaire, référence étant faite à l'article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Parmi les décisions qui n'ont pas usé de pouvoir discrétionnaire dans le cadre de l'application de l'article 12(2), voir :

Australie
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232], - ultérieurement discuté;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, (Fam), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/UKe 596] - ultérieurement remis en cause;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

L'article 18 n'ayant pas été reproduit dans la loi mettant en œuvre la Convention au Québec, il a été considéré que le juge ne dispose pas d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire en cas d'intégration.

Sur l'usage d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire lorsque l'enfant enlevé s'est intégré dans son nouveau milieu, voir :

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 204 et seq.

R. Schuz, « In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Art 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention » Child and Family Law Quarterly, 2008.

Hechos

Los menores, una niña y un varón, tenían aproximadamente 9 y 7 años y nueve meses a la fecha de la supuesta sustracción ilícita. Habían vivido en Polonia toda su vida. Los padres se encontraban separados.

La madre tenía la custodia y el padre derechos de visita. Se alegó que el padre había abusado sexualmente de ambos menores. El 20 de noviembre de 1995 los niños viajaron a Australia para quedarse con la abuela maternal por un plazo de seis meses. La madre viajó a Australia poco tiempo después pero sólo pudo obtener una visa por tres meses. La abuela no restituyó a los niños según lo convenido el 1 de septiembre de 1996.

La madre intentó garantizar la restitución de los menores pero no conocía el Convenio de La Haya. La abuela se negó a enviar a los niños de vuelta, aun cuando ya tenían comprados los pasajes. La madre descubrió en febrero de 1997 que su hija había sido abusada sexualmente por el entonces esposo de la abuela. El 12 de septiembre de 1998 la madre obtuvo una visa y viajó a Australia.

La abuela aún se negó a permitir que los niños volvieran a Polonia. El 24 de septiembre de 1998 la abuela obtuvo una sentencia ex-parte prohibiendo a la madre trasladar a los menores de Australia. La madre, todavía sin saber del Convenio inició un proceso de residencia.

El 25 de noviembre la Autoridad Central solicitó la restitución de los menores. El 1 de diciembre el Tribunal de Familia se negó a ordenar la restitución, entendiendo que los menores se encontraban establecidos en Australia y que se oponían a ser restituidos a Polonia. La Autoridad Central apeló.

Fallo

Apelación rechazada.  Sustracción ilícita pero restitución denegada; se había alcanzado el estándar requerido por el artículo 12(2).

Fundamentos

Grave riesgo - art. 13(1)(b)

El juez de primera instancia aplicó correctamente el examen objetivo requerido por la Regulación 16(3)(b) al entender que no existiría un serio riesgo de daño. Sin embargo, al ejercer su discrecionalidad, se encontraba habilitado para tener en cuenta los miedos y las preocupaciones de los menores respecto de la restitución y a concluir que tal restitución podría causarles un daño psicológico permanente, particularmente porque implicaría la separación de su abuela materna.

Integración del niño - art. 12(2)

Al término "establecido" tal cual aparece en la Regulación 16 de las Regulaciones de Derecho de Familia (Convenio sobre Abuso de Menores), que implementa el Convenio en el derecho australiano, debe asignársele su significado común. No debe seguirse la interpretación más restrictiva adoptada en Graziano v. Daniels (1991) FLC 92-212 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 259]. En este caso, el tribunal entendió que los niños había logrado una destacada adaptación a la vida en Australia. Habían vivido allí alrededor de tres años, estaban establecidos en el colegio, manejaban el idioma ingles y vivían en un ambiente establecido y de amor con su abuela. El hecho de que los niños aún necesitaran hacer consultas por abuso no significaba que no estuvieren establecidos en su nuevo ambiente conforme el significado de las Regulaciones. Una persona puede encontrarse establecida en un ambiente y aun así experimentar problemas serios. El tribunal advirtió que el juez de primera instancia estaba habilitado para tener en consideración las declaraciones de los menores al determinar su grado de establecimiento. El establecimiento debe considerarse al momento en que se presenta la solicitud o al momento del juicio. Las autoridades inglesas que sugieren que un tribunal debe mirar al futuro para determinar si los menores se encuentran "establecidos" y considerar su "posición establecida a largo plazo" no representan la legislación en lo que se refiere a las Regulaciones australianas. Sobre esta base, las dudas que rodean el status migratorio de los menores no alteró su posición establecida en Australia. Finalmente, el tribunal sostuvo que no estaba necesariamente persuadido de que por entender que un menor se encuentra establecido en su nuevo ambiente, ello le quite discrecionalidad para dictar una sentencia de restitución en algún caso.

Cuestiones procesales

El tribunal señaló que los procesos del Convenio son de naturaleza sumaria y que deben decidirse en forma expedita. Consecuentemente, no se requiere que el juez de primera instancia realice un exhaustivo análisis de cada cuestión planteada y el hecho de que no lo haga no puede tomarse como para llegar a la conclusión de que tales cuestiones han sido pasadas por alto.

Comentario INCADAT

Jurisprudencia de Australia y Nueva Zelanda

En Australia, inicialmente se adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b). Véanse:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293].

Sin embargo, luego de la sentencia dictada por el tribunal supremo en el marco de apelaciones conjuntas:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], en la que se adoptó una interpretación literal de la excepción, se presta más atención al riesgo que enfrenta el menor y a la situación posterior a la restitución. 

En el marco del caso de un sustractor —que era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor— que se negaba a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Con relación a un menor que enfrentaba un grave riesgo de daño psicológico, véase:

JMB and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 871].

Para ejemplos recientes de casos en los que se rechazó la excepción de grave riesgo de daño, véase:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 782].

Nueva Zelanda
La autoridad de apelación, en principio, indicó que el cambio de énfasis adoptado en Australia con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) se seguiría asimismo en Nueva Zelanda. Véase:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 495].

No obstante, en la decisión más reciente: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770] el tribunal de apelaciones (High Court) de Nueva Zelanda (Auckland) confirmó, aunque formulado obiter dictum, que la interpretación vinculante en Nueva Zelanda continuaba siendo la interpretación estricta efectuada por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el caso:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 90].

Integración del niño

No ha surgido interpretación uniforme alguna relativa al concepto de integración; en particular si debería interpretarse literalmente o, en cambio, de conformidad con los objetivos del Convenio. En las jurisdicciones que favorecen el último enfoque, la carga de la prueba que incumbe al sustractor es claramente mayor y es más difícil establecer la configuración de la excepción.

Entre las jurisdicciones en las cuales se le ha atribuido una carga de la prueba importante al establecimiento de la integración se encuentran las siguientes:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 106].

En este caso se sostuvo que la integración es mucho más que la mera adaptación al entorno. Implica un elemento físico de estar relacionado con una comunidad y un entorno y de estar establecido en ellos. También tiene un componente emocional que denota seguridad y estabilidad.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 598].

Para la crítica académica de Re N., ver:

Collins L. et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws, 14th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell, Londres, 2006, párrafos 19-121.

Sin embargo, se puede observar que un avance más reciente en Inglaterra ha sido la adopción por parte de la Cámara de los Lores de una evaluación de la integración centrada en el menor en Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]. Este fallo puede afectar la jurisprudencia anterior.

No obstante ello, no hubo ningún debilitamiento aparente de este criterio en el caso no regulado por el Convenio Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 982].

Reino Unido - Escocia
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 107]

Para que se active el artículo 12(2), el interés en que el menor no sea desarraigado debe ser tan convincente de manera de que tenga más peso que el objeto primario del Convenio, a saber, la restitución del menor a la jurisdicción adecuada para que su futuro sea determinado en el lugar adecuado.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 963]

Una situación de integración es una situación en cuya permanencia puede confiarse de manera razonable en las circunstancias del caso y sobre la que no existen indicaciones de cambio radical o derrumbe. Por lo tanto, tiene que existir alguna proyección hacia el futuro.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, 2008 S.C.L.R. 329, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]

Estados Unidos de América
Re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf  134].

Se favoreció una interpretación literal del concepto de integración en:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 291]

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/HK 825].

El impacto de las interpretaciones divergentes es discutiblemente más marcado cuando se encuentran afectados menores muy pequeños.

Se ha sostenido que se debe considerar la integración desde la perspectiva de un menor pequeño en:

Austria
7Ob573/90, Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AT 378];

Australia
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 823];

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 824];

Israel
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/IL 938];

Mónaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général c. M. H. K., [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/MC 510];

Suiza
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (District Court of St. Gallen) (Switzerland), decision of 8 September 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 431].

También se ha adoptado un enfoque centrado en el menor en varias decisiones significativas adoptadas en instancia de apelación con respecto a menores de mayor edad, con el énfasis puesto en las opiniones del menor.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937];

Francia
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 814];

Canadá (Quebec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 653].

En contraste, en la decisión de los Estados Unidos se favoreció una evaluación más objetiva:

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S.2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USs 208].

Los menores, de tres y un año y medio de edad, no habían establecido lazos significativos con su comunidad en Brooklyn; no estaban involucrados en actividades escolares, extracurriculares, comunitarias, religiosas ni sociales en las que se verían involucrados menores de mayor edad.

Facultad discrecional para emitir una orden de restitución cuando el menor se encuentra integrado al nuevo ambiente

A diferencia de las excepciones del artículo 13, el artículo 12(2) no otorga expresamente a los tribunales la facultad discrecional para emitir una orden de restitución si se comprueba su integración. Cuando ha surgido este tema para su consideración, la opinión de la mayoría judicial ha sido, sin embargo, aplicar la disposición como si existiera facultad discrecional, pero esto ha surgido de diferentes maneras.

Australia
La cuestión no se ha decidido de manera concluyente pero parecería haber respaldo, en la apelación, para inferir una facultad discrecional. Se ha hecho referencia a la jurisprudencia de Inglaterra y Escocia, ver:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 276].

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
La jurisprudencia inglesa inicialmente favoreció el inferir que existía una facultad discrecional basada en el Convenio en virtud del artículo 18, ver:

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 598].

Sin embargo, esta interpretación fue rechazada expresamente en la decisión de la Cámara de los Lores Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]. Una mayoría de la sala sostuvo que la interpretación del artículo 12(2) dejaba abierta la cuestión de que existía una facultad discrecional inherente cuando se establece la integración. Se señaló que el artículo 18 no confería ninguna facultad nueva para ordenar la restitución de un menor en virtud del Convenio, sino que contemplaba facultades conferidas por el derecho interno.

Irlanda
Al aceptar la existencia de una facultad discrecional, se hizo referencia a la temprana doctrina inglesa y al artículo 18.

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/IE 391].

Nueva Zelanda
Toda facultad discrecional deriva de la legislación interna que implementa el Convenio, ver:

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 882].

Reino Unido - Escocia
Aunque no se exploró la cuestión en detalle, si no se establecía la integración, había un indicio de que existiría facultad discrecional, haciéndose referencia al artículo 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 107].

Ha habido algunas decisiones en las cuales se concluyó que no había facultad discrecional alguna atribuida al artículo 12(2), entre ellas:

Australia
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232], - posteriormente cuestionada;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 824];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 596] - posteriormente revocada;

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/HK 825];

Canadá (Quebec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-97, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 653].

Puesto que el artículo 18 no se encuentra incluido en la ley de implementación del Convenio en Quebec, se entiende que los tribunales no poseen facultad discrecional alguna cuando se ha establecido la integración del niño.

Para comentarios académicos sobre el uso de la facultad discrecional cuando se ha establecido la integración, ver:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999, en pág. 204 y ss.;

R. Schuz, ‘In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Article 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly.