CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 293

Court

Country

AUSTRALIA

Name

Full Court of the Family Court of Australia at Sydney

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Strauss, Nygh and Rowlands JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

10 December 1990

Status

Final

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

Order

Appeal allowed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(b)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Gsponer v. Director General, Department of Community Services, Vic. (1989) FLC 92-001; C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228.

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Primary Carer Abductions
Economic Factors
Australian and New Zealand Case Law

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The children were 10 1/2, 8 and nearly 4 at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. They had lived in Australia and the United Kingdom. The parents were married and had joint rights of custody.

In late 1989 the family decided to relocate to England. The oldest child moved in November 1989 while the rest of the family followed in April 1990. On 26 June 1990 the mother unilaterally took the two younger children back to Australia. On 27 June 1990 the father obtained ex parte orders from the English High Court making all the children wards of the Court. The Court further declared that the removal of the children was wrongful and ordered their return forthwith.

In July 1990 the father applied to the United Kingdom Central Authority for the return of the children pursuant to the Convention. On 20 July 1990 the application was heard and the return of the two children ordered. The mother applied to the Family Court for a review of that order.

On 7 August the review judge accepted that the removal was wrongful but refused to order the return of the younger children, finding that the standard required under Article 13(1)(b) had been made out. The Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services as the Australian Central Authority appealed.

Ruling

Appeal allowed. Removal wrongful and return ordered; the standard required under Article 13(1)(b) to indicate a grave risk of psychological harm had not been met.

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

Article 13(1)(b) should be read disjunctively. It would be established if the Court was satisfied that there would be a grave risk either of physical harm or of psychological harm or that the child otherwise would be placed in an intolerable situation. The use of the words 'or otherwise' indicates that it is not sufficient merely to establish some degree of psychological harm but that degree must be substantial and, indeed, to a level comparable to an intolerable situation. In the light of that stringent test the trial judge did not have evidence before her to infer that a grave risk of psychological harm, of such a severe degree, would occur if the child were returned to the United Kingdom. The evidence established that the child, like other children in a similar situation, was in a state of anxiety and uncertainty following the physical separation of his parents. There was no evidence to suggest what, if any, the consequences would be on the long term psychological welfare of the child should he be returned to the United Kingdom, even if he were separated from his mother. The Convention is concerned with the allocation of judicial responsibility for determining issues regarding the welfare of the child and that issue was a matter for the appropriate English court in the instant case. If the mother was unable to accompany the child to England and the child was consequently separated from her, the harm would have been created by the mother herself. It would ill behove a party to rely on the fact that he or she has created the very situation which would prevent compliance with the Convention. The fact that the mother could not accompany the child to England for financial reasons or otherwise was no reason for non-compliance with the clear obligation that rests upon the Australian courts under the terms of the Convention.

INCADAT comment

Primary Carer Abductions

The issue of how to respond when a taking parent who is a primary carer threatens not to accompany a child back to the State of habitual residence if a return order is made, is a controversial one.

There are examples from many Contracting States where courts have taken a very strict approach so that, other than in exceptional situations, the Article 13(1)(b) exception has not been upheld where the non-return argument has been raised, see:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 764]

In this case, a non-return order was made since the facts were exceptional. There had been a genuine threat to the mother, which had put her quite obviously and rightfully in fear for her safety if she returned to Israel. The mother was taken to Israel on false pretences, sold to the Russian Mafia and re-sold to the father who forced her into prostitution. She was locked in, beaten by the father, raped and threatened. The mother was genuinely in a state of fear and could not be expected to return to Israel. It would be wholly inappropriate to send the child back without his mother to a father who had been buying and selling women and running a prostitution business.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 269]

However, in a more recent English Court of Appeal judgment, the C. v. C. approach has been refined:

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

In this case, it was ruled that a mother's refusal to return was capable of amounting to a defence because the refusal was not an act of unreasonableness, but came about as a result of an illness she was suffering from. It may be noted, however, that a return order was nevertheless still made. In this context reference may also be made to the decisions of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1068] and Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1147], in which it was accepted that the anxieties of a respondent mother about return, which were not based upon objective risk to her but nevertheless were of such intensity as to be likely, in the event of a return, to destabilise her parenting of the child to the point at which the child's situation would become intolerable, could in principle meet the threshold of the Article 13(1)(b) exception.

Germany
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Previously a much more liberal interpretation had been adopted:
Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 323]

Switzerland
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 1179]

New Zealand
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770]

United Kingdom - Scotland
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 26]

United States of America
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USs 97]

In other Contracting States, the approach taken with regard to non-return arguments has varied:

Australia
In Australia, early Convention case law exhibited a very strict approach adopted with regard to non-return arguments, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]
 
In State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 283], the Family Court of Australia at Melbourne did find the grave risk of harm exception to be established where the mother would not return, but in this case the mother had been denied entry into the United States of America, the child's State of habitual residence.

Following the judgment of the High Court of Australia (the highest court in the Australian judicial system) in the joint appeals DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 346, 347], greater attention has been focused on the post-return situation facing abducted children.

In the context of a primary-carer taking parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence see: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 544]. 

France
In French case law, a permissive approach to Article 13(1)(b) has been replaced with a much more restrictive interpretation. For examples of the initial approach, see:

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 498]

And for examples of the stricter interpretation, see:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
In Israeli case law there are contrasting examples of the judicial response to non-return arguments:
 
Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 832]

in contrast with:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 833]

Poland
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 700]

The Supreme Court noted that it would not be in the child's best interests if she were deprived of her mother's care, were the latter to choose to remain in Poland. However, it equally affirmed that if the child were to stay in Poland it would not be in her interests to be deprived of the care of her father. For these reasons, the Court concluded that it could not be assumed that ordering the return of the child would place her in an intolerable situation.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 701]

The Supreme Court specified that the frequently used argument of the child's potential separation from the taking parent, did not, in principle, justify the application of the exception. It held that where there were no objective obstacles to the return of a taking parent, then it could be assumed that the taking parent considered his own interest to be more important than those of the child.

The Court added that a taking parent's fear of being held criminally liable was not an objective obstacle to return, as the taking parent should have been aware of the consequences of his actions. The situation with regard to infants was however more complicated. The Court held that the special bond between mother and baby only made their separation possible in exceptional cases, and this was so even if there were no objective obstacles to the mother's return to the State of habitual residence. The Court held that where the mother of an infant refused to return, whatever the reason, then the return order should be refused on the basis of Article 13(1)(b). On the facts, return was ordered.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UY 1185]

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
There are decisions of the ECrtHR which have endorsed a strict approach with regard to the compatibility of Hague Convention exceptions and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Some of these cases have considered arguments relevant to the issue of grave risk of harm, including where an abductor has indicated an unwillingness to accompany the returning child, see:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1169]

In this case, the ECrtHR upheld a challenge by the left-behind father that the refusal of the Turkish courts to return his child led to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The ECrtHR stated that whilst very young age was a criterion to be taken into account to determine the child's interest in an abduction case, it could not be considered by itself a sufficient ground, in relation to the requirements of the Hague Convention, to justify dismissal of a return application.

Recourse has been had to expert evidence to assist in ascertaining the potential consequences of the child being separated from the taking parent

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1177]

However, it must equally be noted that since the Grand Chamber ruling in Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, there are examples of a less strict approach being followed. The latter ruling had emphasised the best interests of the individual abducted child in the context of an application for return and the ascertainment of whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation as well as a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, see:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]; and Grand Chamber ruling X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1171]

In this case, a majority found that the return of a child to the United States of America would lead to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The decision-making process of the Belgian Appellate Court as regards Article 13(1)(b) was held not to have met the procedural requirements inherent in Article 8 of the ECHR. The two dissenting judges noted, however, that the danger referred to in Article 13 should not consist only of the separation of the child from the taking parent.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Economic Factors

Article 13(1)(b) and Economic Factors

There are many examples, from a broad range of Contracting States, where courts have declined to uphold the Article 13(1)(b) exception where it has been argued that the taking parent (and hence the children) would be placed in a difficult financial situation were a return order to be made.

Australia
Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]

The fact that the mother could not accompany the child to England for financial reasons or otherwise was no reason for non-compliance with the clear obligation that rests upon the Australian courts under the terms of the Convention.

Canada
Y.D. v. J.B. [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que. C.A.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 369]

Financial weakness was not a valid reason for refusing to return a child. The Court stated: "The signatories to the Convention did not have in mind the protection of children of well-off parents only, leaving exposed and incapable of applying for the return of a wrongfully removed child the parent without wealth whose child was so abducted."

France
CA Lyon, 19 septembre 2011, No de RG 11/02919 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 1168]

The existence of more favourable living conditions in France could not be taken into consideration.

Germany
7 UF 39/99, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 821]

New Zealand
K.M.A. v. Secretary for Justice [2007] NZFLR 891 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 1118]

Financial hardship was not proven on the facts; moreover, the Court of Appeal considered it most unlikely that the Australian authorities would not provide some form of special financial and legal assistance, if required.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
In early case law, the Court of Appeal repeatedly rejected arguments that economic factors could justify finding the existence of an intolerable situation for the purposes of Article 13(1)(b).

Re A. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] Fam 106 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 48]

In this case, the court decided that dependency on State benefits cannot be said in itself to constitute an intolerable situation.

B. v. B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 32, [1993] 2 All ER 144, [1993] 1 FLR 238, [1993] Fam Law 198 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 10]

In this case, it was said that inadequate housing / financial circumstances did not prevent return.

Re M. (Abduction: Undertakings) [1995] 1 FLR 1021 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 20]

The Court suggested that the exception might be established were young children to be left homeless, and without recourse to State benefits. However, to be dependent on Israeli State benefits, or English State benefits, could not be said to constitute an intolerable situation.

United Kingdom - Scotland
Starr v. Starr, 1999 SLT 335 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 195]

IGR, Petitioner [2011] CSOH 208  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 1154]

Switzerland
5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

Zimbabwe
Secretary For Justice v. Parker 1999 (2) ZLR 400 (H) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ZW 340]

There are some examples where courts have placed emphasis on the financial circumstances (or accommodation arrangements) that a child / abductor would face, in deciding whether or not to make a return order:

Australia
Harris v. Harris [2010] FamCAFC 221 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 1119]

The financially precarious position in which the mother would find herself were a return order to be made was a relevant consideration in the making of a non-return order.

France
CA Paris, 13 avril 2012, No de RG 12/0617 [INCADAT Reference : HC/E/FR 1189]

In this case, inadequate housing was a relevant factor in the consideration of a non-return order.

Netherlands
De directie Preventie, optredend voor zichzelf en namens Y (de vader /the father) against X (de moeder/ the mother) (7 February 2001, ELRO nr.AA9851 Zaaknr:813-H-00) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NL 314]

In this case, financial circumstances were a relevant factor in the consideration of a non-return order.

United Kingdom - Scotland
C. v. C. 2003 S.L.T. 793 [INCADAT Reference : HC/E/UKs 998]

An example where financial circumstances did lead to a non-return order being made.

A, Petitioner [2011] CSOH 215, 2012 S.L.T. 370 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 1153]

In this case, adequate accommodation and financial support were relevant factors in the consideration of a non-return order.

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
Šneersone and Kampanella v. Italy (Application No 14737/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1152]

The ECrtHR, in finding that there had been a breach of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in the return of a child from Latvia to Italy, noted that the Italian courts exercising their powers under the Brussels IIa Regulation, had overlooked the fact that it was not financially viable for the mother to return with the child: she spoke no Italian and was virtually unemployable.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Australian and New Zealand Case Law

Australia
In Australia a very strict approach was adopted initially with regard to Article 13(1) b), see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @294@];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @293@].

However, following the judgment of the High Court in the joint appeals:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @346@, @347@], where a literal interpretation of the exception was advocated, greater attention has now been focused on the risk to the child and the post return situation. 

In the context of a primary carer abducting parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence, see:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @544@].

With regard to a child facing a grave risk of psychological harm see:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 871].

For recent examples of cases where the grave risk of harm exception was rejected see:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @782@].

New Zealand
Appellate authority initially indicated that the change in emphasis adopted in Australia with regard to Article 13(1) b) would be followed in New Zealand also, see:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 495].

However, in the more recent decision: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770] the High Court of New Zealand (Auckland) has affirmed, albeit obiter, that the binding interpretation in New Zealand remained the strict interpretation given by the Court of Appeal in:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 90].

Faits

Les enfants étaient âgés de 10 ans 1/2, 8 et presque 4 ans à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Ils avaient vécu en Australie et au Royaume-Uni. Les parents étaient mariés et avaient conjointement la garde.

Fin 1989, la famille décida de s'installer en Angleterre. L'aîné des enfants déménagea en novembre 1989, tandis que le reste de la famille arriva en avril 1990. Le 26 juin 1990, la mère ramena unilatéralement les deux plus jeunes enfants en Australie. Le 27 juin 1990, le père obtint une décision non contradictoire de la High Court anglaise attribuant à tous les enfants la qualité de pupilles judiciaires. Le juge déclara également l'illicéité du déplacement des enfants et ordonna leur retour immédiat.

En juillet 1990, le père saisit l'Autorité Centrale britannique d'une demande tendant au retour des enfants en application de la Convention. Le 20 juillet, la demande fut entendue et le retour des deux enfants ordonné. La mère demanda au juge des affaires familiales de réviser cette décision.

Le 7 août, le juge de révision reconnut que le déplacement était illicite, mais refusa d'ordonner le retour des plus jeunes enfants, estimant que les conditions de l'article 13 alinéa 1 b étaient remplies. Le Director-General of the Department of Family and Community Services interjeta appel en qualité d'Autorité Centrale australienne.

Dispositif

L'appel a été accueilli. Déplacement illicitie ; retour ordonné : les conditions requises par l'article 13 alinéa 1 b en matière de risque grave de danger psychologique n'étaient pas remplies.

Motifs

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

Les trois alternatives de l’article 13 alinéa 1 b doit être lues de manière autonome. Cette disposition s’appliquerait si le juge considérait qu’il avait un risque grave de danger physique ou psychologique ou que l’enfant se trouverait placé dans une situation intolérable. L’usage des terme “ou de toute autre manière” (“or otherwise”) indique qu’il ne suffit pas de faire la preuve d’un certain degré de danger psychologique mais que ce danger doit être sérieux et, en fait, comparable à une situation intolérable. Au regard de ces exigences sévères, le juge ne pouvait considérer la preuve rapportée d’un risque grave de danger psychologique d’un tel degré en cas de retour des enfants au Royaume-Uni. Les éléments de preuve montraient que l’enfant, comme d’autres dans cette situation, se trouvait dans une position d’incertitude et d’anxiété depuis la séparation physique de ses parents. Aucun élément ne permettait de savoir quelles conséquences, pourraient, le cas échéant, affecter le bien-être psychologique de l’enfant en cas de retour au Royaume-Uni, même s’il était séparé de sa mère. La Convention s’intéresse à l’attribution de la compétence judiciaire quant à la détermination du bien-être de l’enfant et cette question relevait de la juridiction anglaise compétente en l’espèce. Si la mère était dans l’impossibilité d’accompagner l’enfant en Angleterre et que celui-ci était conséquemment séparé d’elle, le danger aurait été créé par la mère elle-même. Il n’appartient pas à une partie de tirer argument d’une situation qu’elle a créée pour s’opposer au jeu de la Convention. Le fait que la mère ne pouvait accompagner l’enfant en Angleterre pour des raisons financières, ou autres, ne justifiait pas que les juges australiens se départissent de l’obligation claire qui pèse sur eux en application de la Convention.

Commentaire INCADAT

Enlèvements par le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant

La question de la position à adopter dans les situations où le parent ravisseur est le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, et qu'il menace de ne pas rentrer avec l'enfant dans l'État de résidence habituelle si une ordonnance de retour est rendue, est controversée.

De nombreux États contractants ont adopté une position très stricte au terme de laquelle le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b) n'a été retenu que dans des circonstances exceptionnelles quand l'argument tendant au non-retour de l'enfant était invoqué. Voir :

Autriche
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

Dans cette affaire, les circonstances exceptionnelles ont résulté en une ordonnance de non-retour. La mère faisait face à une menace véritable qui lui faisait craindre légitimement pour sa sécurité si elle retournait en Israël. Elle avait été emmenée en Israël sous un faux prétexte, y avait été vendue à la mafia russe puis revendue au père, qui l'avait forcée à se prostituer. Elle avait alors été enfermée, battue par le père, violée et menacée. La mère était dans un réel état de peur, on ne pouvait attendre d'elle qu'elle retourne en Israël. Il aurait été complètement inapproprié de renvoyer l'enfant sans sa mère vers un père qui avait acheté et vendu des femmes, et dirigé des activités de prostitution.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

Toutefois, dans un jugement plus récent rendu par une Cour d'appel anglaise, la position adoptée en 1989 dans l'affaire C. v. C. fut précisée. Voir :

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Dans cette affaire, il fut décidé que le refus de la mère de retourner dans l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle était susceptible de déclencher le jeu de l'exception en ce qu'il n'était pas imputable à un comportement excessif mais à une maladie dont elle souffrait. Il convient de noter qu'une ordonnance de retour fut malgré tout rendue. On peut également mentionner à ce sujet les décisions de la Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni dans Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] et Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. Dans cette dernière affaire, il fut accepté que les angoisses d'une mère concernant son retour satisfaisaient le niveau de risque requis à l'article 13(1)(b) et justifiaient le jeu de cette exception quoiqu'elles n'étaient pas fondées sur un risque objectif. L'ampleur de ces angoisses était telle qu'elles lui auraient probablement causé des difficultés à assumer normalement son rôle de parent en cas de retour, au point de rendre la situation de l'enfant intolérable.

Allemagne
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Auparavant, une position beaucoup plus libérale avait été adoptée :

Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suisse
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Etats-Unis d'Amérique
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position adoptée quant aux arguments tendant au non-retour de l'enfant a varié :

Australie
En Australie, la jurisprudence ancienne témoigne d'une position initialement très stricte. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

Dans l'affaire State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], le Tribunal de Melbourne avait estimé qu'il y avait bien un risque grave de danger alors que la mère refusait de rentrer avec l'enfant. En l'espèce, toutefois, la mère ne pouvait pas retourner aux États-Unis, État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant, car les autorités de ce pays lui refusaient l'entrée sur le territoire.

Plus récemment, suite à la décision de la Cour suprême qui avait été saisie des appels joints dans D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], les tribunaux ont accordé une attention plus particulière à la situation à laquelle l'enfant allait devoir faire face après son retour.

Pour une illustration de ce phénomène dans une affaire où le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant refusait de rentrer avec lui dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle, voir : Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

France
Dans la jurisprudence française, l'interprétation permissive de l'article 13(1)(b) qui prévalait initialement a été remplacée par une interprétation beaucoup plus stricte. Pour une illustration de l'interprétation permissive initiale. Voir :

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

et pour une illustration de l'interprétation plus stricte, voir :

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israël
Il existe dans la jurisprudence israélienne des exemples contrastés du traitement des exceptions au retour :

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]  contrastant avec :

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Pologne
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Cour Suprême nota qu'il ne serait pas conforme à l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant de la priver des soins de sa mère, si celle-ci décidait de rester en Pologne. La Cour affirma cependant que si l'enfant devait rester en Pologne, il serait tout autant contraire à son intérêt d'être privée des soins de son père. Tenant compte de ces considérations, la Cour conclut qu'il ne pouvait pas être présumé qu'ordonner le retour de l'enfant la placerait dans une situation intolérable.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Cour suprême précisa que l'argument fréquemment avancé de la potentielle séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur ne justifiait pas, en principe, le jeu de l'exception. La Cour jugea qu'en l'absence d'obstacles objectifs au retour du parent ravisseur, on pouvait présumer que celui-ci accordait plus de valeur à ses propres intérêts qu'à ceux de l'enfant.

La Cour ajouta que la crainte pour le parent ravisseur de voir sa responsabilité pénale engagée ne constituait pas un obstacle objectif au retour, puisque celui-ci aurait dû avoir conscience des conséquences de ses actions. La situation était cependant plus compliquée s'agissant des nourrissons. La Cour estima que le lien spécial unissant la mère et le nourrisson ne rendait la séparation possible qu'en cas exceptionnel, et ce même en l'absence d'obstacle objectif au retour de la mère dans l'État de résidence habituelle. La Cour jugea que lorsque la mère d'un nourrisson refusait de revenir avec lui, quelles qu'en soient les raisons, alors le retour devait être refusé sur la base de l'article 13(1)(b). D'après les faits de l'espèce, le retour avait été ordonné.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
Il existe des décisions de la CourEDH adoptant une position stricte relativement à la compatibilité des exceptions de la Convention de La Haye avec la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH). Dans certaines de ces affaires, des arguments relatifs à l'exception pour risque grave étaient considérés, y compris lorsque le parent ravisseur indiquait son refus d'accompagner le retour de l'enfant. Voir :

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH confirma un recours du père à qui l'enfant avait été enlevé selon lequel les juridictions turques avaient commis une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH en refusant d'ordonner le retour de son enfant. La CourEDH jugea que, bien que le très jeune âge d'un enfant soit un critère à prendre en compte dans la détermination de son intérêt, cela ne constituait pas en soi, selon les exigences de la Convention de La Haye, un motif suffisant pour justifier le rejet d'une demande de retour.

Il a parfois été fait recours à des témoignages d'expert afin de faciliter l'évaluation des conséquences potentielles de la séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur. Voir :

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Cependant, il faut également noter que, depuis la décision de la Grande Chambre dans l'affaire Neulinger et Shuruk c Suisse, il est des exemples où une approche moins stricte est suivie. Dans le contexte d'une demande de retour, ce dernier jugement avait placé l'accent sur l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant enlevé et sur le fait de vérifier que les autorités nationales compétentes avaient conduit un examen détaillé de la situation familiale dans son ensemble ainsi qu'une appréciation équilibrée et raisonnable de tous les intérêts en jeu. Voir :

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; et décision de la Grand Chamber X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH estima à la majorité que le retour d'un enfant aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique entrainerait une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH. Il fut jugé que le processus de prise de décision de la Cour d'appel belge, en ce qui concerne l'article 13(1)(b), n'avait pas satisfait aux exigences procédurales posées par l'article 8 de la CEDH. Les deux juges dissidents notèrent cependant que le danger visé par l'article 13 ne saurait résulter de la seule séparation de l'enfant et du parent ravisseur.

(Auteur: Peter McEleavy, avril 2013)

Difficultés financières

L'article 13(1) b) et les difficultés financières

Dans de nombreux États contractants les juridictions ont adopté une approche stricte lorsqu'il a été soutenu que le parent demandeur (et par conséquent l'enfant) serait mis dans une situation financière difficile si une ordonnance de retour était rendue.

Australie
Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 293]

Le fait que la mère ne pouvait accompagner l'enfant en Angleterre pour des raisons financières, ou autres, ne justifiait pas que les juges australiens se départissent de l'obligation claire qui pèse sur eux en application de la Convention.

Canada
Y.D. v. J.B., [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que.C.A.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 369]

La mère alléguait que les difficultés financières du père conduiraient à exposer les enfants à un risque grave de danger. La juge estima au contraire que l'existence de difficultés financières ne justifiait pas le refus de retour des enfants. Selon le juge : « les États signataires de la Convention ne cherchaient pas à protéger uniquement les enfants dont les parents sont aisés, en laissant à l'abandon les enfants de parents moins riches. Victimes d'enlèvement, ces enfants aussi doivent pouvoir faire l'objet d'une décision de retour ». [Traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Allemagne
7 UF 39/99, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 821].

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans des arrêts anciens, la cour d'appel a généralement rejeté les arguments selon lesquels les difficultés pécuniaires pourraient caractériser une situation intolérable au sens de l'article 13(1) b).

Re A. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] Fam 106 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 48].

Dépendre des allocations de l'État ne peut être en soi considéré comme une situation intolérable.

B. v. B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam. 32 (C.A.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 10].

Les difficultés financières et de logement n'empêchaient pas le prononcé d'une ordonnance de retour.

Dans Re M. (Abduction: Undertakings) [1995] 1 FLR 1021 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 20], il a été suggéré qu'une exception pouvait être établie lorsque des jeunes enfants étaient susceptibles de se trouver sans foyer, soit qu'ils bénéficient des  prestations sociales versées par l'État soit qu'ils n'en bénéficient pas. La dépendance financière aux prestations sociales versées par l'État israélien ou l'État anglais ne saurait constituer une situation intolérable.

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Starr v. Starr 1999 SLT 335, 1998 SCLR (Notes) 775 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 195];

Suisse
5A_285/2007 /frs, Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 955];

Zimbabwe
Secretary For Justice v. Parker 1999 (2) ZLR 400 (H) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZW 340].

Pour un exemple d'affaire dans laquelle une ordonnance de non retour a été rendue sur la basée de circonstances financières, voir :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse C. v. C. 2003 S.L.T. 793 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 998].

Ce fut également un facteur pertinent dans l'affaire suivante:

Pays-Bas
De directie Preventie, optredend voor zichzelf en namens Y (de vader /the father) against X (de moeder/ the mother) (7 February 2001, ELRO nr.AA9851 Zaaknr:813-H-00) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL 314].

Jurisprudence australienne et néo-zélandaise

Australie
En Australie une interprétation très stricte prévalait dans la jurisprudence ancienne rendue sur le fondement de l'article 13(1) b). Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @293@].

Toutefois, à la suite du jugement prononcé par la Court suprême Australienne dans les appels joints de:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority ; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401 ; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 346, 347], dans lesquels une interprétation littérale a été adoptée, l'attention se tourne désormais sur le risque encouru par l'enfant et la situation à laquelle il sera confronté après le retour.

Pour une décision rendue dans une situation où le parent ravisseur, ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, refuse de rentrer dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant avec ce dernier, voir :

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 544].

Pour un exemple de situation dans laquelle l'enfant est exposé à un risque grave de danger psychique, voir:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 871].

Pour des exemples d'affaires récentes dans lesquelles l'exception de risque grave a été rejetée, voir :

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 782].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Des décisions d'appel avaient initialement laissé entendre que le revirement de jurisprudence australien serait également suivi en Nouvelle-Zélande, voir :

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 495].

Toutefois, la décision récente de la Cour d'appel (Auckland) (Nouvelle-Zélande),:K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770], a réaffirmé (quoique dans obiter dictum) que l'interprétation qu'il convenait de suivre en Nouvelle-Zélande restait l'interprétation stricte donnée par la Cour d'appel dans :

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 90].

Hechos

Los menores tenían 10 años y 6 meses, 8 años y aproximadamente 4 a la fecha de la supuesta sustracción ilícita. Habían vivido en Australia y en el Reino Unido. Los padres se encontraban casados y tenían derechos de custodia compartida.

A fines de 1989 la familia decidió reubicarse en Inglaterra. El hijo mayor se mudó en noviembre de 1989 en tanto que el resto de la familia lo hizo en abril de 1990. El 26 de junio de 1990 la madre en forma unilateral llevó a los dos hijos menores de vuelta a Australia. El 27 de junio de 1990 el padre obtuvo resoluciones ex parte del Tribunal Superior de Inglaterra poniendo a todos los menores bajo la guarda del Tribunal. Éste declaró asimismo, que el traslado de los niños había sido ilícito y ordenó su inmediata restitución.

En julio de 1990 el padre solicitó a la Autoridad Central del Reino Unido la restitución de los menores conforme el Convenio. El 20 de Julio de 1990 la solicitud fue tratada y se ordenó la restitución de ambos menores. La madre solicitó al Tribunal de Familia que revisara la decisión.

El 7 de agosto el juez revisor aceptó que el traslado era ilícito pero rechazó la decisión de restituir a los hijos más pequeños, entendiendo que no se había alcanzado el estándar requerido por el artículo 13 (1)(b). El Director General del Departmento de Servicios a la Familia y la Comunidad como Autoridad Central Australiana apeló.

Fallo

Se hizo lugar a la apelación. Sustracción ilícita y se ordenó la restitución, no se había alcanzado el estándar requerido por el artículo 13 (1)(b) para indicar un grave riesgo de daño psicológico.

Fundamentos

Grave riesgo - art. 13(1)(b)

El artículo 13(1)(b) debería leerse disyuntivamente. Se establecería si el Tribunal estaba de acuerdo en que existencia de un grave riesgo ya sea de daño físico o psicológico, o de que el menor fuera de alguna otra forma puesto en una situación intolerable. El uso de los terminus 'o de alguna otra forma' indica que no es suficiente con establecer meramente algún grado de daño psicológico, sino que tal grado debe ser sustancial y, más aun, debe estar a un nivel comparable con el de una situación intolerable. A la luz de ese examen riguroso, la juez de primera instancia no contaba con pruebas ante ella como para inferir que pudiera darse un grave riesgo de daño psicológico de un grado tan severo en caso de que los menores fueran restituidos al Reino Unido. La pruebas establecieron que el menor, tal como otros niños en situación similar, se encontraba en un estado de ansiedad e incertidumbre luego de la separación física de sus padres. No había prueba que sugiriera cuáles, en caso de existir, serían las consecuencias en el bienestar psicológico a largo plazo del menor en caso de que fuera restituido al Reino Unido, aun si fuera separado de su madre. El Convenio se interesa por asignar responsabilidad judicial en la determinación de cuestiones relativas al bienestar del menor y esa cuestión era un tema para el tribunal inglés competente en el presente caso. Si la madre no podía acompañar al menor a Inglaterra y como consecuencia de ello, éste se separaba de ella, el daño lo habría creado la propia madre. Sería malo hacer a una parte confiar en el hecho de que él o ella crearan la misma situación que evitaría el cumplimiento del Convenio. El hecho de que la madre no pudiera acompañar al menor a Inglaterra por cuestiones económicas o de otro tipo no era motivo para no cumplir con la clara obligación que pesaba sobre los tribunales australianos conforme los términos del Convenio.

Comentario INCADAT

Sustracción por quien ejerce el cuidado principal del menor

Una cuestión controvertida es cómo responder cuando el padre que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor lo sustrae y amenaza con no acompañarlo de regreso al Estado de residencia habitual en caso de expedirse una orden de restitución.

Los tribunales de muchos Estados contratantes han adoptado un enfoque muy estricto, por lo que, salvo en situaciones muy excepcionales, se han rehusado a estimar la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) cuando se presenta este argumento relativo a la negativa del sustractor a regresar. Véanse:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 27/02/1996 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canadá
M.G. c. R.F., [2002] R.J.Q. 2132 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., [1999] R.D.F. 38 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

En este caso se dictó una resolución de no restitución porque los hechos eran excepcionales. Había habido una amenaza genuina a la madre, que justificadamente le generó temor por su seguridad si regresaba a Israel. Fue engañada y llevada a Israel, vendida a la mafia rusa y revendida al padre, quien la forzó a prostituirse. Fue encerrada, golpeada por el padre, violada y amenazada. Estaba realmente atemorizada, por lo que no podía esperarse que regresara a Israel. Habría sido totalmente inapropiado enviar al niño de regreso sin su madre a un padre que había estado comprando y vendiendo mujeres y llevando adelante un negocio de prostitución.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

No obstante, una sentencia más reciente del Tribunal de Apelaciones inglés ha refinado el enfoque del caso C. v. C.: Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] EWCA Civ 908, [2002] 3 FCR 43 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469].

En este caso, se resolvió que la negativa de una madre a restituir al menor era apta para configurar una defensa, puesto que no constituía un acto carente de razonabilidad, sino que surgía como consecuencia de una enfermedad que ella padecía. Cabe destacar, sin embargo, que aun así se expidió una orden de restitución. En este marco se puede hacer referencia a las sentencias del Tribunal Supremo del Reino Unido en Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] y Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. En estas decisiones se aceptó que el temor que una madre podía tener con respecto a la restitución ―aunque no estuviere fundado en riesgos objetivos, pero sí fuere de una intensidad tal como para considerar que el retorno podría afectar sus habilidades de cuidado al punto de que la situación del niño podría volverse intolerable―, en principio, podría ser suficiente para declarar configurada la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b).

Alemania
10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Anteriormente, se había adoptado una interpretación mucho más liberal: 17 UF 260/98, Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suiza
5P.71/2003 /min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P.65/2002/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referenia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007 /frs, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nueva Zelanda
K.S. v. LS. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Reino Unido - Escocia
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Estados Unidos de América
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct. September 24, 1997) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

En otros Estados contratantes, el enfoque adoptado con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución ha sido diferente:

Australia
En Australia, en un principio, la jurisprudencia relativa al Convenio adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución. Véase:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

En la sentencia State Central Authority v. Ardito, de 20 de octubre de 1997 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], el Tribunal de Familia de Melbourne estimó que la excepción de grave riesgo se encontraba configurada por la negativa de la madre a la restitución, pero, en este caso, a la madre se le había negado la entrada a los Estados Unidos de América, Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

Luego de la sentencia dictada por el High Court de Australia (la máxima autoridad judicial en el país), en el marco de las apelaciones conjuntas D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], se prestó más atención a la situación que debe enfrentar el menor luego de la restitución.

En el marco de los casos en que el progenitor sustractor era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor, que luego se niega a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Francia
En Francia, un enfoque permisivo del artículo 13(1)(b) ha sido reemplazado por una interpretación mucho más restrictiva. Véanse:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12.7.1994, S. c. S., Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, No de pourvoi 98-17902 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

Los casos siguientes constituyen ejemplos de la interpretación más estricta:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de pourvoi 02-17411 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de pourvoi 11/01437 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
En la jurisprudencia israelí se han adoptado respuestas divergentes a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución:

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro. v. Ro [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]

A diferencia de:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y. v. D.R. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Polonia
Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 7 de octubre de 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Corte Suprema señaló que privar a la niña del cuidado de su madre, si esta última decidía permanecer en Polonia, era contrario al interés superior de la menor. No obstante, también afirmó que si permanecía en Polonia, estar privada del cuidado de su padre también era contrario a sus intereses. Por estas razones, el Tribunal llegó a la conclusión de que no se podía declarar que la restitución fuera a colocarla en una situación intolerable.

Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 1 de diciembre de 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Corte Suprema precisó que el típico argumento sobre la posible separación del niño del padre privado del menor no es suficiente, en principio, para que se configure la excepción. Declaró que en los casos en los que no existen obstáculos objetivos para que el padre sustractor regrese, se puede presumir que el padre sustractor adjudica una mayor importancia a su propio interés que al interés del niño.

La Corte añadió que el miedo del padre sustractor a incurrir en responsabilidad penal no constituye un obstáculo objetivo a la restitución, ya que se considera que debería haber sido consciente de sus acciones. Sin embargo, la situación se complica cuando los niños son muy pequeños. La Corte declaró que el lazo especial que existe entre la madre y su bebe hace que la separación sea posible solo en casos excepcionales, aun cuando no existan circunstancias objetivas que obstaculicen el regreso de la madre al Estado de residencia habitual. La Corte declaró que en los casos en que la madre de un niño pequeño se niega a la restitución, por la razón que fuere, se deberá desestimar la demanda de retorno sobre la base del artículo 13(1)(b). En base a los hechos del caso, se resolvió en favor de la restitución.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)
Existen sentencias del TEDH en las que se adoptó un enfoque estricto con respecto a la compatibilidad de las excepciones del Convenio de La Haya con el Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH). En algunos de estos casos se plantearon argumentos respecto de la cuestión del grave riesgo, incluso en asuntos en los que el padre sustractor ha expresado una negativa a acompañar al niño en el retorno. Véase:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

En este caso, el TEDH acogió la apelación del padre solicitante en donde este planteaba que la negativa de los tribunales turcos a resolver la restitución del menor implicaba una vulneración del artículo 8 del CEDH. El TEDH afirmó que si bien se debe tener en cuenta la corta edad del menor para determinar qué es lo más conveniente para él en un asunto de sustracción, no se puede considerar este criterio por sí solo como justificación suficiente, en el sentido del Convenio de La Haya, para desestimar la demanda de restitución.

Se ha recurrido a pruebas periciales para determinar las consecuencias que pueden resultar de la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05), 6 de diciembre de 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10), 18 de enero de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12), 15 de mayo de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Sin embargo, también cabe señalar que desde la sentencia de la Gran Sala del caso Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland ha habido ejemplos en los que se ha adoptado un enfoque menos estricto. En esta sentencia se había puesto énfasis en el interés superior del niño en el marco de una demanda de restitución, y en determinar si los tribunales nacionales habían llevado a cabo un examen pormenorizado de la situación familiar y una evaluación equilibrada y razonable de los intereses de cada una de las partes. Véanse:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Gran Sala, 6 de julio de 2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), 13 de diciembre de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; y sentencia de la Gran Sala X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), Gran Sala [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11), 10 de julio de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

En este caso, la mayoría sostuvo que el retorno del menor a los Estados Unidos de América constituiría una violación al artículo 8 del CEDH. Se declaró que el proceso decisorio del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Bélgica con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) no había observado los requisitos procesales inherentes al artículo 8 del CEDH. Los dos jueces que votaron en disidencia resaltaron, no obstante, que el riesgo al que hace referencia el artículo 13 no debe estar relacionado únicamente con la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Factores económicos

Artículo 13(1)(b) y factores económicos

Existen muchos ejemplos, de una variedad de Estados contratantes, en los que los tribunales desestimaron la aplicación de la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) en casos en que se había aducido que el sustractor (y, por lo tanto, los menores) serían puestos en una situación económica difícil en el supuesto de expedirse una orden de restitución.

Australia
Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

El hecho de que la madre no pudiera acompañar al menor a Inglaterra por razones económicas o de otra naturaleza no justificaba el incumplimiento de la clara obligación que incumbe a los tribunales australianos en virtud del Convenio.

Canadá
Y.D. v. J.B., [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que.C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 369]

Una situación económica difícil no representaba una razón válida para rehusarse a restituir a un menor. El Tribunal declaró: "Los signatarios del Convenio no tuvieron presente solamente la protección de menores con padres adinerados, dejando expuestos y sin posibilidad de solicitar la restitución de un menor sustraído en forma ilícita a los padres sin recursos."

France
CA Lyon, 19 septembre 2011, No de RG 11/02919 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1168]

Las condiciones de vida más favorables en Francia no podían ser tenidas en consideración.

Alemania
7 UF 39/99, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 821]

Nueva Zelanda
K.M.A. v. Secretary for Justice [2007] NZFLR 891 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 1118]

No se probó la existencia de dificultades económicas. Además, el Tribunal de Apelaciones estimó que era muy poco probable que, de ser necesario, las autoridades australianas no proveyeran algún tipo de asistencia económica o jurídica.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En la jurisprudencia temprana, en reiteradas oportunidades, el Tribunal de Apelaciones rechazó alegaciones de que los factores económicos pudieran justificar el pronunciamiento de la existencia de una situación intolerable a efectos del artículo 13(1)(b).

Re A. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] Fam 106 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Uke 48]

En este caso, el tribunal resolvió que no puede afirmarse que la dependencia de prestaciones del Estado constituya una situación intolerable.

B. v. B. (Abduction: custody rights) [1993] Fam. 32, [1993] 2 All ER 144, [1993] 1 FLR 238, [1993] Fam Law 198 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 10]

Dificultades económicas o de vivienda no impidieron que se ordenara la restitución.

Re M. (Abduction: Undertakings) [1995] 1 FLR 1021 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 20]

El tribunal sugirió que la excepción podría establecerse si los niños pequeños fueran a quedar sin vivienda y sin acceso a prestaciones del Estado. No obstante, no podía afirmarse que depender de prestaciones del Estado israelí o del Estado inglés constituyera una situación intolerable.

Reino Unido - Escocia
Starr v. Starr 1999 SLT 335, 1998 SCLR (Notes) 775 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 195]

Suiza
5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

Zimbabue
Secretary For Justice v. Parker 1999 (2) ZLR 400 (H) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZW 340]

En algunos casos, los tribunales han adjudicado importancia a la situación económica (o de vivienda) que el niño o el sustractor enfrentarían para establecer si procede o no ordenar el retorno del menor:

Australia
Harris v. Harris [2010] FamCAFC 221 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1119]

La precaria situación económica en la que se encontraría la madre de ordenarse el retorno del menor fue un factor relevante en la denegación de la restitución.

Francia
CA Paris, 13 avril 2012, No de RG 12/0617 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1189]

En este caso, las dificultades con respecto a la vivienda tuvieron una gran incidencia en la decisión de si correspondía denegar el retorno del menor.

Países Bajos
De directie Preventie, optredend voor zichzelf en namens Y (de vader) tegen X (de moeder) (7 de febrero de 2001, ELRO nr.AA9851 Zaaknr:813-H-00) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NL 314]

En este caso, la situación económica constituyó un factor relevante para establecer si procedía denegar el retorno del menor.

Reino Unido - Escocia
C. v. C. 2003 S.L.T. 793 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 998]

Este caso constituye un ejemplo de cuando la situación económica justifica la denegación de la restitución.

A, Petitioner [2011] CSOH 215, 2012 S.L.T. 370 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 1153]

En este caso, disponer de una vivienda y recursos económicos adecuados fue un factor relevante para establecer si procedía denegar la restitución.

Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)
Šneersone and Kampanella v. Italy (Application No 14737/09) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1152]

Con respecto al retorno de un menor de Letonia a Italia, el TEDH declaró la existencia de una vulneración al artículo 8 del Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH) y señaló que los tribunales italianos con competencia según el Reglamento Bruselas II bis no habían tenido en cuenta el hecho de que no era económicamente viable para la madre regresar con el menor ya que no hablaba italiano y prácticamente no podía conseguir trabajo.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Jurisprudencia de Australia y Nueva Zelanda

En Australia, inicialmente se adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b). Véanse:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293].

Sin embargo, luego de la sentencia dictada por el tribunal supremo en el marco de apelaciones conjuntas:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], en la que se adoptó una interpretación literal de la excepción, se presta más atención al riesgo que enfrenta el menor y a la situación posterior a la restitución. 

En el marco del caso de un sustractor —que era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor— que se negaba a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Con relación a un menor que enfrentaba un grave riesgo de daño psicológico, véase:

JMB and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 871].

Para ejemplos recientes de casos en los que se rechazó la excepción de grave riesgo de daño, véase:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 782].

Nueva Zelanda
La autoridad de apelación, en principio, indicó que el cambio de énfasis adoptado en Australia con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) se seguiría asimismo en Nueva Zelanda. Véase:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 495].

No obstante, en la decisión más reciente: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770] el tribunal de apelaciones (High Court) de Nueva Zelanda (Auckland) confirmó, aunque formulado obiter dictum, que la interpretación vinculante en Nueva Zelanda continuaba siendo la interpretación estricta efectuada por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el caso:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 90].