CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 294

Court

Country

AUSTRALIA

Name

Family Court of Australia at Brisbane

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Lindenmayer J.

States involved

Requesting State

SOUTH AFRICA

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

24 September 1999

Status

Final

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Undertakings

Order

Return ordered subject to undertakings

HC article(s) Considered

3 5 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

5 13(1)(b)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
In the Marriage of Hanbury Brown (1996) FLC 92-671; C v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 2 All ER 465; State Central Authority of Victoria v. Ardito, 20 October 1997, transcript, Family Court of Australia (Melbourne).

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Primary Carer Abductions
Australian and New Zealand Case Law

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child, a girl, was 5 1/3 at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. She had lived in South Africa all of her life. The parents were divorced. The mother had custody and the father access.

On 18 November 1998 the mother took the child to Australia. On 15 January 1999 the mother's partner returned to South Africa and informed the father that the mother was unable to return to South Africa due to health reasons. In February 1999 the mother gave birth to her partner's child in Australia.

On 8 March the mother's partner informed the father that the mother would not be returning to South Africa. The father then initiated return proceedings. On 17 June 1999 the Director-General of the Department of Families, Youth and Community Care of the State of Queensland, in the capacity as State Central Authority applied for the return of the child.

Ruling

Return ordered subject to undertakings; the removal of the child breached the father's rights of custody and the standard of harm required under Article 13(1)(b) had not been established.

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

The father had a right to determine the place of residence of the child, accordingly that gave rise to a right of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

It was argued that the child would face a grave risk of harm because the mother did not wish to, and was not in fact able to, return to South Africa. This was due to the fact that since arriving in Australia she had given birth to a second daughter whom she was still breast-feeding. Moreover, her new partner refused to allow his new-born daughter to go to South Africa. The court held that the situation the mother found herself in was one largely of her own making. The fact that the mother faced an uncomfortable dilemma did not lead to a conclusion that to order the return of the older child would expose that child to a grave risk of harm.

Undertakings

The applicant father made several undertakings to facilitate the return of mother and child. Notably he pledged not to institute fresh, or to voluntarily support, criminal or civil charges against her. In addition, the father indicated his consent to the undertakings being incorporated into mirror orders to be filed in the High Court of South Africa.

INCADAT comment

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Primary Carer Abductions

The issue of how to respond when a taking parent who is a primary carer threatens not to accompany a child back to the State of habitual residence if a return order is made, is a controversial one.

There are examples from many Contracting States where courts have taken a very strict approach so that, other than in exceptional situations, the Article 13(1)(b) exception has not been upheld where the non-return argument has been raised, see:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 764]

In this case, a non-return order was made since the facts were exceptional. There had been a genuine threat to the mother, which had put her quite obviously and rightfully in fear for her safety if she returned to Israel. The mother was taken to Israel on false pretences, sold to the Russian Mafia and re-sold to the father who forced her into prostitution. She was locked in, beaten by the father, raped and threatened. The mother was genuinely in a state of fear and could not be expected to return to Israel. It would be wholly inappropriate to send the child back without his mother to a father who had been buying and selling women and running a prostitution business.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 269]

However, in a more recent English Court of Appeal judgment, the C. v. C. approach has been refined:

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

In this case, it was ruled that a mother's refusal to return was capable of amounting to a defence because the refusal was not an act of unreasonableness, but came about as a result of an illness she was suffering from. It may be noted, however, that a return order was nevertheless still made. In this context reference may also be made to the decisions of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1068] and Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1147], in which it was accepted that the anxieties of a respondent mother about return, which were not based upon objective risk to her but nevertheless were of such intensity as to be likely, in the event of a return, to destabilise her parenting of the child to the point at which the child's situation would become intolerable, could in principle meet the threshold of the Article 13(1)(b) exception.

Germany
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Previously a much more liberal interpretation had been adopted:
Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 323]

Switzerland
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 1179]

New Zealand
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770]

United Kingdom - Scotland
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 26]

United States of America
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USs 97]

In other Contracting States, the approach taken with regard to non-return arguments has varied:

Australia
In Australia, early Convention case law exhibited a very strict approach adopted with regard to non-return arguments, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]
 
In State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 283], the Family Court of Australia at Melbourne did find the grave risk of harm exception to be established where the mother would not return, but in this case the mother had been denied entry into the United States of America, the child's State of habitual residence.

Following the judgment of the High Court of Australia (the highest court in the Australian judicial system) in the joint appeals DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 346, 347], greater attention has been focused on the post-return situation facing abducted children.

In the context of a primary-carer taking parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence see: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 544]. 

France
In French case law, a permissive approach to Article 13(1)(b) has been replaced with a much more restrictive interpretation. For examples of the initial approach, see:

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 498]

And for examples of the stricter interpretation, see:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
In Israeli case law there are contrasting examples of the judicial response to non-return arguments:
 
Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 832]

in contrast with:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 833]

Poland
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 700]

The Supreme Court noted that it would not be in the child's best interests if she were deprived of her mother's care, were the latter to choose to remain in Poland. However, it equally affirmed that if the child were to stay in Poland it would not be in her interests to be deprived of the care of her father. For these reasons, the Court concluded that it could not be assumed that ordering the return of the child would place her in an intolerable situation.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 701]

The Supreme Court specified that the frequently used argument of the child's potential separation from the taking parent, did not, in principle, justify the application of the exception. It held that where there were no objective obstacles to the return of a taking parent, then it could be assumed that the taking parent considered his own interest to be more important than those of the child.

The Court added that a taking parent's fear of being held criminally liable was not an objective obstacle to return, as the taking parent should have been aware of the consequences of his actions. The situation with regard to infants was however more complicated. The Court held that the special bond between mother and baby only made their separation possible in exceptional cases, and this was so even if there were no objective obstacles to the mother's return to the State of habitual residence. The Court held that where the mother of an infant refused to return, whatever the reason, then the return order should be refused on the basis of Article 13(1)(b). On the facts, return was ordered.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UY 1185]

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
There are decisions of the ECrtHR which have endorsed a strict approach with regard to the compatibility of Hague Convention exceptions and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Some of these cases have considered arguments relevant to the issue of grave risk of harm, including where an abductor has indicated an unwillingness to accompany the returning child, see:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1169]

In this case, the ECrtHR upheld a challenge by the left-behind father that the refusal of the Turkish courts to return his child led to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The ECrtHR stated that whilst very young age was a criterion to be taken into account to determine the child's interest in an abduction case, it could not be considered by itself a sufficient ground, in relation to the requirements of the Hague Convention, to justify dismissal of a return application.

Recourse has been had to expert evidence to assist in ascertaining the potential consequences of the child being separated from the taking parent

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1177]

However, it must equally be noted that since the Grand Chamber ruling in Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, there are examples of a less strict approach being followed. The latter ruling had emphasised the best interests of the individual abducted child in the context of an application for return and the ascertainment of whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation as well as a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, see:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]; and Grand Chamber ruling X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1171]

In this case, a majority found that the return of a child to the United States of America would lead to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The decision-making process of the Belgian Appellate Court as regards Article 13(1)(b) was held not to have met the procedural requirements inherent in Article 8 of the ECHR. The two dissenting judges noted, however, that the danger referred to in Article 13 should not consist only of the separation of the child from the taking parent.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Australian and New Zealand Case Law

Australia
In Australia a very strict approach was adopted initially with regard to Article 13(1) b), see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @294@];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @293@].

However, following the judgment of the High Court in the joint appeals:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @346@, @347@], where a literal interpretation of the exception was advocated, greater attention has now been focused on the risk to the child and the post return situation. 

In the context of a primary carer abducting parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence, see:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @544@].

With regard to a child facing a grave risk of psychological harm see:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 871].

For recent examples of cases where the grave risk of harm exception was rejected see:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @782@].

New Zealand
Appellate authority initially indicated that the change in emphasis adopted in Australia with regard to Article 13(1) b) would be followed in New Zealand also, see:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 495].

However, in the more recent decision: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770] the High Court of New Zealand (Auckland) has affirmed, albeit obiter, that the binding interpretation in New Zealand remained the strict interpretation given by the Court of Appeal in:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 90].

Faits

L'enfant, une fille, était âgée de 5 ans 1/3 à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Elle avait toujours vécu en Afrique du Sud. les parents avaient divorcé. La mère avait la garde, le père un droit de visite.

Le 18 novembre 1998, la mère emmena l'enfant en Australie. Le 15 janvier 1999, le compagnon de la mère rentra en Afrique du Sud et informa le père que la mère se trouvait dans l'impossibilité de rentrer en Afrique du Sud pour des raisons de santé. En février 1999, la mère donna naissance en Australie à l'enfant de son compagnon.

Le 8 mars, le compagnon de la mère informa le père que la mère ne rentrerait pas en Afrique du Sud. Le père entama la procédure de retour. Le 17 juin 1999, l'Autorité Centrale agissant sous la forme du Director-General of the department of Families, Youth and Community Care de l'Etat du Queensland, demanda le retour de l'enfant.

Dispositif

Retour ordonné ; des engagements étant prononcés ; le déplacement de l'enfant était intervenu en violation du droit de garde du père et les conditions de l'article 13 alinéa 1 b n'étaient pas remplies.

Motifs

Droit de garde - art. 3

Le père avait le droit de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l’enfant ; ce qui caractérisait un droit de garde au sens de la Convention.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

Il était allégué que l’enfant ferait face à un risque grave de danger car la mère ne souhaitait ni n’était en mesure de rentrer en Afrique du Sud. Cela résultait du fait que depuis son arrivée en Australie, elle avait donné naissance à un bébé qu’elle continuait à allaiter elle-même. De plus, son nouveau compagnon refusait de permettre au bébé d’aller en Afrique du Sud. Le juge estima que la situation dans laquelle se trouvait la mère lui était largement imputable. Le fait qu’elle était confrontée à un dilemme très désagréable n’impliquait cependant pas que le retour de l’enfant exposerait ce dernier à un risque grave de danger.

Engagements

Le père demandeur prit divers engagements pour faciliter le retour de l’enfant et de la mère. Il s’engagea notamment à ne pas introduire de lui-même ni apporter son soutien volontaire à une instance criminelle ou civile à l’encontre de la mère. En outre, le père donna son autorisation en vue que ses engagements soient homologués dans une décision miroir à introduire devant la High Court d’Afrique du Sud.

Commentaire INCADAT

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.

Enlèvements par le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant

La question de la position à adopter dans les situations où le parent ravisseur est le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, et qu'il menace de ne pas rentrer avec l'enfant dans l'État de résidence habituelle si une ordonnance de retour est rendue, est controversée.

De nombreux États contractants ont adopté une position très stricte au terme de laquelle le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b) n'a été retenu que dans des circonstances exceptionnelles quand l'argument tendant au non-retour de l'enfant était invoqué. Voir :

Autriche
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

Dans cette affaire, les circonstances exceptionnelles ont résulté en une ordonnance de non-retour. La mère faisait face à une menace véritable qui lui faisait craindre légitimement pour sa sécurité si elle retournait en Israël. Elle avait été emmenée en Israël sous un faux prétexte, y avait été vendue à la mafia russe puis revendue au père, qui l'avait forcée à se prostituer. Elle avait alors été enfermée, battue par le père, violée et menacée. La mère était dans un réel état de peur, on ne pouvait attendre d'elle qu'elle retourne en Israël. Il aurait été complètement inapproprié de renvoyer l'enfant sans sa mère vers un père qui avait acheté et vendu des femmes, et dirigé des activités de prostitution.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

Toutefois, dans un jugement plus récent rendu par une Cour d'appel anglaise, la position adoptée en 1989 dans l'affaire C. v. C. fut précisée. Voir :

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Dans cette affaire, il fut décidé que le refus de la mère de retourner dans l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle était susceptible de déclencher le jeu de l'exception en ce qu'il n'était pas imputable à un comportement excessif mais à une maladie dont elle souffrait. Il convient de noter qu'une ordonnance de retour fut malgré tout rendue. On peut également mentionner à ce sujet les décisions de la Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni dans Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] et Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. Dans cette dernière affaire, il fut accepté que les angoisses d'une mère concernant son retour satisfaisaient le niveau de risque requis à l'article 13(1)(b) et justifiaient le jeu de cette exception quoiqu'elles n'étaient pas fondées sur un risque objectif. L'ampleur de ces angoisses était telle qu'elles lui auraient probablement causé des difficultés à assumer normalement son rôle de parent en cas de retour, au point de rendre la situation de l'enfant intolérable.

Allemagne
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Auparavant, une position beaucoup plus libérale avait été adoptée :

Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suisse
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Etats-Unis d'Amérique
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position adoptée quant aux arguments tendant au non-retour de l'enfant a varié :

Australie
En Australie, la jurisprudence ancienne témoigne d'une position initialement très stricte. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

Dans l'affaire State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], le Tribunal de Melbourne avait estimé qu'il y avait bien un risque grave de danger alors que la mère refusait de rentrer avec l'enfant. En l'espèce, toutefois, la mère ne pouvait pas retourner aux États-Unis, État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant, car les autorités de ce pays lui refusaient l'entrée sur le territoire.

Plus récemment, suite à la décision de la Cour suprême qui avait été saisie des appels joints dans D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], les tribunaux ont accordé une attention plus particulière à la situation à laquelle l'enfant allait devoir faire face après son retour.

Pour une illustration de ce phénomène dans une affaire où le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant refusait de rentrer avec lui dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle, voir : Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

France
Dans la jurisprudence française, l'interprétation permissive de l'article 13(1)(b) qui prévalait initialement a été remplacée par une interprétation beaucoup plus stricte. Pour une illustration de l'interprétation permissive initiale. Voir :

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

et pour une illustration de l'interprétation plus stricte, voir :

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israël
Il existe dans la jurisprudence israélienne des exemples contrastés du traitement des exceptions au retour :

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]  contrastant avec :

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Pologne
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Cour Suprême nota qu'il ne serait pas conforme à l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant de la priver des soins de sa mère, si celle-ci décidait de rester en Pologne. La Cour affirma cependant que si l'enfant devait rester en Pologne, il serait tout autant contraire à son intérêt d'être privée des soins de son père. Tenant compte de ces considérations, la Cour conclut qu'il ne pouvait pas être présumé qu'ordonner le retour de l'enfant la placerait dans une situation intolérable.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Cour suprême précisa que l'argument fréquemment avancé de la potentielle séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur ne justifiait pas, en principe, le jeu de l'exception. La Cour jugea qu'en l'absence d'obstacles objectifs au retour du parent ravisseur, on pouvait présumer que celui-ci accordait plus de valeur à ses propres intérêts qu'à ceux de l'enfant.

La Cour ajouta que la crainte pour le parent ravisseur de voir sa responsabilité pénale engagée ne constituait pas un obstacle objectif au retour, puisque celui-ci aurait dû avoir conscience des conséquences de ses actions. La situation était cependant plus compliquée s'agissant des nourrissons. La Cour estima que le lien spécial unissant la mère et le nourrisson ne rendait la séparation possible qu'en cas exceptionnel, et ce même en l'absence d'obstacle objectif au retour de la mère dans l'État de résidence habituelle. La Cour jugea que lorsque la mère d'un nourrisson refusait de revenir avec lui, quelles qu'en soient les raisons, alors le retour devait être refusé sur la base de l'article 13(1)(b). D'après les faits de l'espèce, le retour avait été ordonné.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
Il existe des décisions de la CourEDH adoptant une position stricte relativement à la compatibilité des exceptions de la Convention de La Haye avec la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH). Dans certaines de ces affaires, des arguments relatifs à l'exception pour risque grave étaient considérés, y compris lorsque le parent ravisseur indiquait son refus d'accompagner le retour de l'enfant. Voir :

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH confirma un recours du père à qui l'enfant avait été enlevé selon lequel les juridictions turques avaient commis une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH en refusant d'ordonner le retour de son enfant. La CourEDH jugea que, bien que le très jeune âge d'un enfant soit un critère à prendre en compte dans la détermination de son intérêt, cela ne constituait pas en soi, selon les exigences de la Convention de La Haye, un motif suffisant pour justifier le rejet d'une demande de retour.

Il a parfois été fait recours à des témoignages d'expert afin de faciliter l'évaluation des conséquences potentielles de la séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur. Voir :

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Cependant, il faut également noter que, depuis la décision de la Grande Chambre dans l'affaire Neulinger et Shuruk c Suisse, il est des exemples où une approche moins stricte est suivie. Dans le contexte d'une demande de retour, ce dernier jugement avait placé l'accent sur l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant enlevé et sur le fait de vérifier que les autorités nationales compétentes avaient conduit un examen détaillé de la situation familiale dans son ensemble ainsi qu'une appréciation équilibrée et raisonnable de tous les intérêts en jeu. Voir :

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; et décision de la Grand Chamber X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH estima à la majorité que le retour d'un enfant aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique entrainerait une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH. Il fut jugé que le processus de prise de décision de la Cour d'appel belge, en ce qui concerne l'article 13(1)(b), n'avait pas satisfait aux exigences procédurales posées par l'article 8 de la CEDH. Les deux juges dissidents notèrent cependant que le danger visé par l'article 13 ne saurait résulter de la seule séparation de l'enfant et du parent ravisseur.

(Auteur: Peter McEleavy, avril 2013)

Jurisprudence australienne et néo-zélandaise

Australie
En Australie une interprétation très stricte prévalait dans la jurisprudence ancienne rendue sur le fondement de l'article 13(1) b). Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @293@].

Toutefois, à la suite du jugement prononcé par la Court suprême Australienne dans les appels joints de:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority ; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401 ; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 346, 347], dans lesquels une interprétation littérale a été adoptée, l'attention se tourne désormais sur le risque encouru par l'enfant et la situation à laquelle il sera confronté après le retour.

Pour une décision rendue dans une situation où le parent ravisseur, ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, refuse de rentrer dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant avec ce dernier, voir :

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 544].

Pour un exemple de situation dans laquelle l'enfant est exposé à un risque grave de danger psychique, voir:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 871].

Pour des exemples d'affaires récentes dans lesquelles l'exception de risque grave a été rejetée, voir :

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 782].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Des décisions d'appel avaient initialement laissé entendre que le revirement de jurisprudence australien serait également suivi en Nouvelle-Zélande, voir :

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 495].

Toutefois, la décision récente de la Cour d'appel (Auckland) (Nouvelle-Zélande),:K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770], a réaffirmé (quoique dans obiter dictum) que l'interprétation qu'il convenait de suivre en Nouvelle-Zélande restait l'interprétation stricte donnée par la Cour d'appel dans :

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 90].

Hechos

La menor, era una niña de cinco años y cuatro meses a la fecha de la sustracción ilícita. Había vivido en Sudáfrica toda su vida. Los padres estaban divorciados. La madre tenía custodia y el padre derecho de visita.

El 18 de noviembre de 1998 la madre llevó a la menor a Australia. El 15 de enero de 1999 el compañero de la madre regresó a Sudáfrica e informó al padre que la madre no podía regresar a Sudáfrica por razones de salud. En febrero de 1999 la madre dio a luz al hijo de su compañero en Australia.

El 8 de marzo el compañero de la madre le informó al padre que la madre no regresaría a Sudáfrica. El padre inició acciones para la restitución. El 17 de junio de 1999 el Director General del Departamento de Familias, Juventud y Atención comunitaria del Estado de Queensland en carácter de Autoridad Central del Estado solicitó la restitución de la menor.

Fallo

Se ordenó la restitución sujeta a compromisos; la sustracción de la menor violaba los derechos de custodia del padre y no se logró establecer que se hubiera alcanzado el nivel de daño exigido por el Artículo 13(1)(b).

Fundamentos

Derechos de custodia - art. 3

El padre tendía un derecho a determinar el lugar de residencia de la menor, por consiguiente ello dio lugar a un derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio.

Grave riesgo - art. 13(1)(b)

Se alegó que la menor enfrentaría un grave riesgo de daño porque la madre no deseaba y en realidad no podía, regresar a Sudáfrica. Esto se debía a que cuando llegó a Australia dio a luz a una segunda hija a la que estaba amamantando. Además, su nuevo compañero se negaba a permitir que su nueva hija recién nacida fuera a Sudáfrica. El tribunal sostuvo que la situación en la que se encontraba la madre era, en gran medida, algo que ella misma había generado. El hecho de que la madre enfrentaba un dilema incómodo no conducía a la conclusión de que ordenar la restitución de la hija menor expusiera a dicha menor a un grave riesgo de daño.

Compromisos

El padre solicitante asumió varios compromisos para facilitar el regreso de la madre y de la menor. Específicamente prometió no iniciar ni apoyar en forma voluntaria acusaciones penales o civiles contra ella. Además, el padre indicó su consentimiento para que los compromisos fueran incorporados a órdenes en espejo que serían presentadas en el Tribunal Superior de Sudáfrica.

Comentario INCADAT

¿Qué se entiende por derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio?

Los tribunales de una abrumadora mayoría de Estados contratantes han aceptado que el derecho a oponerse a la salida del menor de la jurisdicción equivale a un derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio. Véanse:

Australia
En el caso Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, Oberster Gerichtshof, 05/02/1992 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AT 375];

Canadá
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 11];

La Corte Suprema estableció una distinción entre una cláusula de no traslado en una orden de custodia provisoria y en una orden definitiva. Sugirió que si una cláusula de no traslado incluida en una orden de custodia definitiva se considerara equivalente a un derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio, ello tendría serias implicancias para los derechos de movilidad de la persona que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 334];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880];

Francia
Ministère Public c. M.B., 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 62];

Alemania
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Tribunal Constitucional Federal), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 803];

Sudáfrica
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 309];

Suiza
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 427].

Estados Unidos de América
[Traducción en curso - Por favor remítase a la versión inglesa]

Right to Object to a Removal
[Traducción en curso - Por favor remítase a la versión inglesa]

Para comentarios académicos véanse:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 ss;

M. Bailey, The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention, Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287.

C. Whitman, Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Sustracción por quien ejerce el cuidado principal del menor

Una cuestión controvertida es cómo responder cuando el padre que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor lo sustrae y amenaza con no acompañarlo de regreso al Estado de residencia habitual en caso de expedirse una orden de restitución.

Los tribunales de muchos Estados contratantes han adoptado un enfoque muy estricto, por lo que, salvo en situaciones muy excepcionales, se han rehusado a estimar la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) cuando se presenta este argumento relativo a la negativa del sustractor a regresar. Véanse:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 27/02/1996 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canadá
M.G. c. R.F., [2002] R.J.Q. 2132 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., [1999] R.D.F. 38 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

En este caso se dictó una resolución de no restitución porque los hechos eran excepcionales. Había habido una amenaza genuina a la madre, que justificadamente le generó temor por su seguridad si regresaba a Israel. Fue engañada y llevada a Israel, vendida a la mafia rusa y revendida al padre, quien la forzó a prostituirse. Fue encerrada, golpeada por el padre, violada y amenazada. Estaba realmente atemorizada, por lo que no podía esperarse que regresara a Israel. Habría sido totalmente inapropiado enviar al niño de regreso sin su madre a un padre que había estado comprando y vendiendo mujeres y llevando adelante un negocio de prostitución.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

No obstante, una sentencia más reciente del Tribunal de Apelaciones inglés ha refinado el enfoque del caso C. v. C.: Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] EWCA Civ 908, [2002] 3 FCR 43 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469].

En este caso, se resolvió que la negativa de una madre a restituir al menor era apta para configurar una defensa, puesto que no constituía un acto carente de razonabilidad, sino que surgía como consecuencia de una enfermedad que ella padecía. Cabe destacar, sin embargo, que aun así se expidió una orden de restitución. En este marco se puede hacer referencia a las sentencias del Tribunal Supremo del Reino Unido en Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] y Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. En estas decisiones se aceptó que el temor que una madre podía tener con respecto a la restitución ―aunque no estuviere fundado en riesgos objetivos, pero sí fuere de una intensidad tal como para considerar que el retorno podría afectar sus habilidades de cuidado al punto de que la situación del niño podría volverse intolerable―, en principio, podría ser suficiente para declarar configurada la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b).

Alemania
10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Anteriormente, se había adoptado una interpretación mucho más liberal: 17 UF 260/98, Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suiza
5P.71/2003 /min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P.65/2002/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referenia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007 /frs, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nueva Zelanda
K.S. v. LS. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Reino Unido - Escocia
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Estados Unidos de América
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct. September 24, 1997) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

En otros Estados contratantes, el enfoque adoptado con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución ha sido diferente:

Australia
En Australia, en un principio, la jurisprudencia relativa al Convenio adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución. Véase:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

En la sentencia State Central Authority v. Ardito, de 20 de octubre de 1997 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], el Tribunal de Familia de Melbourne estimó que la excepción de grave riesgo se encontraba configurada por la negativa de la madre a la restitución, pero, en este caso, a la madre se le había negado la entrada a los Estados Unidos de América, Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

Luego de la sentencia dictada por el High Court de Australia (la máxima autoridad judicial en el país), en el marco de las apelaciones conjuntas D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], se prestó más atención a la situación que debe enfrentar el menor luego de la restitución.

En el marco de los casos en que el progenitor sustractor era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor, que luego se niega a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Francia
En Francia, un enfoque permisivo del artículo 13(1)(b) ha sido reemplazado por una interpretación mucho más restrictiva. Véanse:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12.7.1994, S. c. S., Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, No de pourvoi 98-17902 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

Los casos siguientes constituyen ejemplos de la interpretación más estricta:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de pourvoi 02-17411 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de pourvoi 11/01437 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
En la jurisprudencia israelí se han adoptado respuestas divergentes a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución:

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro. v. Ro [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]

A diferencia de:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y. v. D.R. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Polonia
Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 7 de octubre de 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Corte Suprema señaló que privar a la niña del cuidado de su madre, si esta última decidía permanecer en Polonia, era contrario al interés superior de la menor. No obstante, también afirmó que si permanecía en Polonia, estar privada del cuidado de su padre también era contrario a sus intereses. Por estas razones, el Tribunal llegó a la conclusión de que no se podía declarar que la restitución fuera a colocarla en una situación intolerable.

Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 1 de diciembre de 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Corte Suprema precisó que el típico argumento sobre la posible separación del niño del padre privado del menor no es suficiente, en principio, para que se configure la excepción. Declaró que en los casos en los que no existen obstáculos objetivos para que el padre sustractor regrese, se puede presumir que el padre sustractor adjudica una mayor importancia a su propio interés que al interés del niño.

La Corte añadió que el miedo del padre sustractor a incurrir en responsabilidad penal no constituye un obstáculo objetivo a la restitución, ya que se considera que debería haber sido consciente de sus acciones. Sin embargo, la situación se complica cuando los niños son muy pequeños. La Corte declaró que el lazo especial que existe entre la madre y su bebe hace que la separación sea posible solo en casos excepcionales, aun cuando no existan circunstancias objetivas que obstaculicen el regreso de la madre al Estado de residencia habitual. La Corte declaró que en los casos en que la madre de un niño pequeño se niega a la restitución, por la razón que fuere, se deberá desestimar la demanda de retorno sobre la base del artículo 13(1)(b). En base a los hechos del caso, se resolvió en favor de la restitución.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)
Existen sentencias del TEDH en las que se adoptó un enfoque estricto con respecto a la compatibilidad de las excepciones del Convenio de La Haya con el Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH). En algunos de estos casos se plantearon argumentos respecto de la cuestión del grave riesgo, incluso en asuntos en los que el padre sustractor ha expresado una negativa a acompañar al niño en el retorno. Véase:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

En este caso, el TEDH acogió la apelación del padre solicitante en donde este planteaba que la negativa de los tribunales turcos a resolver la restitución del menor implicaba una vulneración del artículo 8 del CEDH. El TEDH afirmó que si bien se debe tener en cuenta la corta edad del menor para determinar qué es lo más conveniente para él en un asunto de sustracción, no se puede considerar este criterio por sí solo como justificación suficiente, en el sentido del Convenio de La Haya, para desestimar la demanda de restitución.

Se ha recurrido a pruebas periciales para determinar las consecuencias que pueden resultar de la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05), 6 de diciembre de 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10), 18 de enero de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12), 15 de mayo de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Sin embargo, también cabe señalar que desde la sentencia de la Gran Sala del caso Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland ha habido ejemplos en los que se ha adoptado un enfoque menos estricto. En esta sentencia se había puesto énfasis en el interés superior del niño en el marco de una demanda de restitución, y en determinar si los tribunales nacionales habían llevado a cabo un examen pormenorizado de la situación familiar y una evaluación equilibrada y razonable de los intereses de cada una de las partes. Véanse:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Gran Sala, 6 de julio de 2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), 13 de diciembre de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; y sentencia de la Gran Sala X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), Gran Sala [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11), 10 de julio de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

En este caso, la mayoría sostuvo que el retorno del menor a los Estados Unidos de América constituiría una violación al artículo 8 del CEDH. Se declaró que el proceso decisorio del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Bélgica con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) no había observado los requisitos procesales inherentes al artículo 8 del CEDH. Los dos jueces que votaron en disidencia resaltaron, no obstante, que el riesgo al que hace referencia el artículo 13 no debe estar relacionado únicamente con la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Jurisprudencia de Australia y Nueva Zelanda

En Australia, inicialmente se adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b). Véanse:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293].

Sin embargo, luego de la sentencia dictada por el tribunal supremo en el marco de apelaciones conjuntas:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], en la que se adoptó una interpretación literal de la excepción, se presta más atención al riesgo que enfrenta el menor y a la situación posterior a la restitución. 

En el marco del caso de un sustractor —que era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor— que se negaba a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Con relación a un menor que enfrentaba un grave riesgo de daño psicológico, véase:

JMB and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 871].

Para ejemplos recientes de casos en los que se rechazó la excepción de grave riesgo de daño, véase:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 782].

Nueva Zelanda
La autoridad de apelación, en principio, indicó que el cambio de énfasis adoptado en Australia con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) se seguiría asimismo en Nueva Zelanda. Véase:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 495].

No obstante, en la decisión más reciente: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770] el tribunal de apelaciones (High Court) de Nueva Zelanda (Auckland) confirmó, aunque formulado obiter dictum, que la interpretación vinculante en Nueva Zelanda continuaba siendo la interpretación estricta efectuada por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el caso:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 90].