CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 312

Court

Country

AUSTRALIA

Name

Family Court of Australia at Brisbane

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Lindenmayer J.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

13 December 1994

Status

Final

Grounds

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12 | Consent - Art. 13(1)(a) | Procedural Matters

Order

Application dismissed

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1)(a)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Gsponer v. Director General, Department of Community Services, Victoria (1989) FLC 92-001.

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Consent
Classifying Consent
Establishing Consent

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child, a boy, was 11 months old at the date of the alleged wrongful retention. He had lived in the United States for the majority of his life. The parents were married and had joint rights of custody. On 25 November 1993 the mother took the child to Australia, her State of origin. The purpose of the trip was in dispute.

In late December the mother informed the father that they would not be returning. She argued that this was merely repeating what had already been said prior to their departure. The father stated that this was the first time he became aware that the mother intended to leave the United States permanently. On 2 February 1994 the father contacted the United States Central Authority.

On 22 August the Queensland Central Authority petitioned for the return of the child in the Family Court of Australia (Brisbane). The Central Authority conceded that if the father had consented to the permanent relocation of the child the removal or subsequent retention could not be wrongful.

Ruling

Application dismissed; the retention was not wrongful as the father had consented to the relocation of mother and child to Australia.

Grounds

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12

The court accepted the evidence presented by the mother that the father had consented to her relocation to Australia with their son. The father had, inter alia, assisted in their departure, given them many personal effects and was aware that they had bought a one-way ticket. The court held that such consent, once given, could not be subsequently withdrawn. The court accepted as correct the concession by the Central Authority that neither the removal nor retention of the child could therefore be wrongful in terms of Article 3. Consequently the provisions of Article 13 could not apply. Notwithstanding this finding the court went onto consider how it would have exercised its discretion had it found the case to come within Article 13(1)(a). It held that if consent had been given in circumstances of duress, undue influence, deceit or emotional distress for the person concerned, then there would be strong grounds to make a return order. However, these factors were not relevant in the instant case. Rather, regard should be paid to the welfare of the child and the practical consequences of a return order. Considering these issues the court ruled that it would nevertheless have exercised its discretion under Article 13(1)(a) not to order the return of the child.

Consent - Art. 13(1)(a)

See above.

Procedural Matters

The court noted that it is difficult to resolve contested issues of fact on the basis of affidavit evidence where it does not have the benefit of hearing oral evidence and assessing the credibility of witnesses. The court further held where an applicant parent was unable to attend caution should be exercised to avoid disadvantaging him or her by giving greater credit to the parent who is present before the court.

INCADAT comment

Classifying Consent

The classification of consent has given rise to difficulty. Some courts have indeed considered that the issue of consent goes to the wrongfulness of the removal or retention and should therefore be considered within Article 3, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 312];

France
CA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340, [INCADAT cite : HC/E/FR 897];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 54];

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1014].

Although the issue had ostensibly been settled in English case law, that consent was to be considered under Art 13(1) a), neither member of the two judge panel of the Court of Appeal appeared entirely convinced of this position. 

Reference can equally be made to examples where trial courts have not considered the Art 3 - Art 13(1) a) distinction, but where consent, in terms of initially going along with a move, has been treated as relevant to wrongfulness, see:

Canada
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 969];

Switzerland
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 425];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 186].

The case was not considered in terms of the Art 3 - Art 13(1) a) distinction, but given that the father initially went along with the relocation it was held that there would be neither a wrongful removal or retention.

The majority view is now though that consent should be considered in relation to Article 13(1) a), see:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 830];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 53];

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267];

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 591];

Ireland
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 287];

United Kingdom - Scotland
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 997];

For a discussion of the issues involved see Beaumont & McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, 1999 at p. 132 et seq.

Establishing Consent

Different standards have been applied when it comes to establishing the Article 13(1) a) exception based on consent.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In an early first instance decision it was held that ordinarily the clear and compelling evidence which was necessary would need to be in writing or at least evidenced by documentary material, see:

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37].

This strict view has not been repeated in later first instance English cases, see:

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 53];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 55].

In Re K. it was held that while consent must be real, positive and unequivocal, there could be circumstances in which a court could be satisfied that consent had been given, even though not in writing.  Moreover, there could also be cases where consent could be inferred from conduct.

Germany
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 491].

Convincing evidence is required to establish consent.

Ireland
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 817].

The Re K. approach was specifically endorsed by the Irish Supreme Court.

The Netherlands
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NL 318].

Consent need not be for a permanent stay.  The only issue is that there must be consent and that it has been proved convincingly.

South Africa
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

Consent could be express or tacit.

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841];

5P.380/2006 /blb; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 895];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung ) (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 896];

The Swiss Supreme Court has held that with regard to consent and acquiescence, the left behind parent must clearly agree, explicitly or tacitly, to a durable change in the residence of the child.  To this end the burden is on the abducting parent to show factual evidence which would lead to such a belief being plausible.

United States of America
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 808].

There must be a subjective assessment of what the applicant parent was actually contemplating. Consideration must also be given to the nature and scope of the consent.

Faits

L'enfant, un garçon, était âgé de 11 mois à la date du non-retour dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Il avait passé la majeure partie de son existence aux Etats-Unis. Les parents étaient mariés et disposaient conjointement de la garde. Le 25 novembre 1993, la mère emmena l'enfant en Australie, dont elle était originaire. L'objet de ce voyage est controversé.

Fin décembre, la mère informa le père de ce qu'elle ne rentrerait pas. Selon elle, il était clair dès son départ qu'elle ne rentrerait pas. Le père prétendait au contraire qu'elle n'avait pas fait part de sa décision de quitter les Etats-Unis de manière permanente avant cette date.

Le 2 février 1994, le père contacta l'Autorité Centrale des Etats-Unis. Le 22 août, l'Autorité Centrale du Queensland saisit le juge aux affaires familiales de Brisbane (Australie) d'une demande tendant au retour de l'enfant. L'Autorité Centrale reconnut que si le père avait consenti à l'installation de l'enfant en Australie de manière permanente, le déplacement et le non-retour subséquent de l'enfant ne pouvaient être qualifiés d'illicites.

Dispositif

Demande rejetée ; le non-retour n'était pas illicite dès lors que le père avait consenti à l'installation de la mère et l'enfant en Australie.

Motifs

Déplacement et non-retour - art. 3 et 12

Le juge estima que la mère avait établi que le père avait consenti à l'installation de la mère et l'enfant en Australie. Le père avait, entre autres, participé aux préparatifs de départ leur donnant de nombreux effets personnels et avait conscience de l'achat d'un aller-simple. Le juge observa qu'un tel consentement, une fois acquis, ne peut être révoqué. Le juge confirma donc l'affirmation de l'Autorité Centrale selon laquelle ni le déplacement, ni le non-retour de l'enfant ne pouvait être illicites au sens de l'article 3. Dès lors, les dispositions de l'article 13 se trouvaient inapplicables. Nonobstant, le juge se demanda quelle décision il aurait prise dans le cadre de son pouvoir d'appréciation si l'article 13 alinéa 1 a avait pu être appliqué. Il estima que si le consentement avait été donné dans des circonstances de contrainte, d'influences indues, de dol ou de stress émotionnel affectant la personne concernée, alors le retour avait de fortes chances d'être ordonné. Toutefois, de tels facteurs étaient absents en l'espèce. Bien plus, il convenait de s'attacher au bien-être de l'enfant et aux conséquences pratiques qu'aurait la remise de l'enfant. En définitive, le juge indiqua qu'il aurait donc souverainement décidé de refuser d'ordonner le retour de l'enfant si l'article 13 alinéa 1 a avait été applicable.

Consentement - art. 13(1)(a)

Le juge estima que la mère avait établi que le père avait consenti à l'installation de la mère et l'enfant en Australie. Le père avait, entre autres, participé aux préparatifs de départ leur donnant de nombreux effets personnels et avait conscience de l'achat d'un aller-simple. Le juge observa qu'un tel consentement, une fois acquis, ne peut être révoqué. Le juge confirma donc l'affirmation de l'Autorité Centrale selon laquelle ni le déplacement, ni le non-retour de l'enfant ne pouvait être illicites au sens de l'article 3. Dès lors, les dispositions de l'article 13 se trouvaient inapplicables. Nonobstant, le juge se demanda quelle décision il aurait prise dans le cadre de son pouvoir d'appréciation si l'article 13 alinéa 1 a avait pu être appliqué. Il estima que si le consentement avait été donné dans des circonstances de contrainte, d'influences indues, de dol ou de stress émotionnel affectant la personne concernée, alors le retour avait de fortes chances d'être ordonné. Toutefois, de tels facteurs étaient absents en l'espèce. Bien plus, il convenait de s'attacher au bien-être de l'enfant et aux conséquences pratiques qu'aurait la remise de l'enfant. En définitive, le juge indiqua qu'il aurait donc souverainement décidé de refuser d'ordonner le retour de l'enfant si l'article 13 alinéa 1 a avait été applicable.

Questions procédurales

Le juge observa qu'il n'est pas aisé de trouver une solution à des controverses de fait sur le fondement de simples attestations écrites, sans la possibilité d'entendre les dépositions orales des témoins ni de tester leur crédibilité. Le juge ajouta qu'en cas de défaut du parent demandeur, il convenait de procéder avec précaution afin de ne pas le désavantager en accordant toute confiance au parent qui comparaît.

Commentaire INCADAT

Qualification du consentement

La question de savoir si le consentement relève de l'article 3 ou de l'article 13(1) a) a posé difficulté. Certaines juridictions considèrent que le consentement est un élément permettant d'apprécier l'illicéité du déplacement ou du non-retour, et l'apprécient donc dans le cadre de l'article 3. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @312@];

FranceCA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 897];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @54@];

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1014].

Bien que la question eût été a priori réglée par la jurisprudence anglaise, selon laquelle le consentement relevait de l'art. 13(1) a), aucun des deux juges de la Cour d'appel siégeant en l'espèce n'est apparu convaincu par cette position.

On peut aussi évoquer des exemples où des tribunaux de première instance n'ont pas fait référence à la distinction entre l'art. 3 et l'art. 13(1) a) mais où le consentement, en tant qu'acceptation initiale du déménagement, a été considéré comme un élément de l'illicéité, voir:

Canada
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 969], Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 969];

Suisse
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 425]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 186].

L'affaire n'a pas été abordée sous l'angle de la distinction entre l'art. 3 et l'art. 13(1) a), mais étant donné que le père avait initialement accepté le déménagement, il a été considéré qu'il n'y avait eu ni déplacement ni non-retour illicite.

La plupart des décisions révèlent toutefois que la question du consentement est généralement analysée dans le contexte de l'article 13(1) a), voir :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @830@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @53@] ;

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912 ;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @267@] ;

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @591@] ;

Irlande
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @287@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 997].

Pour une analyse des problèmes cités ci-dessus, voir.: P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 132 et seq.

Établissement du consentement

Des exigences différentes ont été appliquées en matière d'établissement d'une exception de l'article 13(1) a) pour consentement.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans une décision de première instance ancienne, il fut considéré qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve claire et impérieuse et qu'en général cette preuve devait être écrite ou en tout cas soutenue par des éléments de preuve écrits. Voir :

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @37@].

Cette approche restrictive n'a pas été maintenue dans des décisions de première instance plus récentes au Royaume-Uni. Voir :

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @53@];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @55@].

Dans Re K. il fut décidé que si le consentement devait être réel, positif and non équivoque, il y avait des situations dans lesquelles le juge pouvait se satisfaire de preuves non écrites du consentement, et qu'il se pouvait même que le consentement fût déduit du comportement.

Allemagne
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE @491@].

Il fut décidé qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve convaincante du consentement.

Irlande
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @817@].

La Cour suprême irlandaise repris expressément les termes de Re K.

Pays-Bas
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL @318@].

Le consentement peut ne pas porter sur un séjour permanent, pourvu que le consentement à un séjour au moins temporaire soit établi de manière convaincante.

Afrique du Sud
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @900@].

Le consentement pouvait être exprès ou tacite.

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@] ;

5P.380/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @895@];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @896@].

Le Tribunal fédéral suisse estima qu'il y avait consentement et acquiescement du parent victime si celui-ci avait accepté, expressément ou implicitement, un changement durable de la résidence de l'enfant. Il appartenait au parent ravisseur d'apporter des éléments de preuve factuels rendant plausible qu'il avait pu croire à ce consentement.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @808@].

Il convenait de rechercher ce que le parent victime avait en tête et également de prendre en compte la nature et l'étendue du consentement.

Hechos

El menor era un niño de once meses a la fecha de la supuesta sustracción ilícita. Había vivido en los EE.UU. la mayor parte de su vida. Los padres estaban casados y tenían derechos de custodia compartidos. El 25 de noviembre de 1993 la madre llevó al menor a Australia, su Estado de origen. El objeto del viaje estaba en discusión.

A fines de dicembre la madre le informó al padre que no regresarían. Ella alegó que esto era simplemente repetir lo que ya se había dicho antes de su partida. El padre declaró que esta era la primera vez que él tomaba conocimiento de que la madre deseaba dejar los EE.UU. en forma permanente.

El 2 de febreri de 1994 el padre contactó a la Autoridad Central de los EE.UU. El 22 de agosto la Autoridad Central de Queenlsand solicitó la restitución del menor en el Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane). La Autoridad Central concedió que si el padre había consentido a la reubicación permanente del menor el traslado y retención subsiguiente no podían considerarse como ilícitos.

Fallo

Solicitud desestimada; la retención no fue ilícita ya que el padre había consentido a la reubicación de la madre y el menor en Australia.

Fundamentos

Traslado y retención - arts. 3 y 12

El tribunal aceptó la prueba presentada por la madre de que el padre había consentido a su reubicación en Australia con el hijo de ambos. El padre, entre otras cosas, había ayudado en su partida, les había dado muchos efectos personales y tenía conocimiento de que habían comprado un pasaje de ida solamente. El tribunal sostuvo que tal consentimiento, una vez dado, no podría ser subsiguientemente retirado. El tribunal aceptó como correcta la concesión de parte de la Autoridad Central de que ni el traslado ni la retención del menor podrían considerarse como ilícitos en los términos del Artículo 3. Por consiguiente, las disposiciones del Artículo 13 no se podían aplicar. Independientemente de estas conclusiones, el tribunal consideró cómo habría ejercido su poder discrecional si hubiera concluido que el caso se ajustaba al Artículo 13(1)(a). Sostuvo que si el consentimiento hubiera sido dado en circunstancias de violencia, intimidación, engaño o angustia para la persona involucrada, entonces habría fundadísimas razones para emitir una orden de restitución. Sin embargo, estos factores no se daban en este caso. En realidad, era preferible prestar atención al bienestar del menor y a las consecuencias prácticas de una orden de restitución. Considerando estas cuestiones, el tribunal decidió que no obstante ejercería su poder discrecional conforme al Artículo 13(1)(a) para no ordenar la restitución del menor.

Consentimiento - art. 13(1)(a)

El tribunal aceptó la prueba presentada por la madre de que el padre había consentido a su reubicación en Australia con el hijo de ambos. El padre, entre otras cosas, había ayudado en su partida, les había dado muchos efectos personales y tenía conocimiento de que habían comprado un pasaje de ida solamente. El tribunal sostuvo que tal consentimiento, una vez dado, no podría ser subsiguientemente retirado. El tribunal aceptó como correcta la concesión de parte de la Autoridad Central de que ni el traslado ni la retención del menor podrían considerarse como ilícitos en los términos del Artículo 3. Por consiguiente, las disposiciones del Artículo 13 no se podían aplicar. Independientemente de estas conclusiones, el tribunal consideró cómo habría ejercido su poder discrecional si hubiera concluido que el caso se ajustaba al Artículo 13(1)(a). Sostuvo que si el consentimiento hubiera sido dado en circunstancias de violencia, intimidación, engaño o angustia para la persona involucrada, entonces habría fundadísimas razones para emitir una orden de restitución. Sin embargo, estos factores no se daban en este caso. En realidad, era preferible prestar atención al bienestar del menor y a las consecuencias prácticas de una orden de restitución. Considerando estas cuestiones, el tribunal decidió que no obstante ejercería su poder discrecional conforme al Artículo 13(1)(a) para no ordenar la restitución del menor.

Cuestiones procesales

El tribunal señaló que era difícil resolver cuestiones controvertidas de hecho sobre la base de una prueba de una declaración jurada cuando no cuenta con el beneficio de escuchar pruebas orales y evaluar la credibilidad de los testigos. El tribunal además sostuvo que cuando un padre solicitante no podía asistir, debía ejercerse la precaucion para evitar dejarlo en desventaja o dándole mayor crédito al progenitor que estaba presente frente al tribunal.

Comentario INCADAT

Clasificación del consentimiento

La clasificación del consentimiento ha traído dificultades. Algunos tribunales efectivamente han considerado que la cuestión del consentimiento hace a la ilicitud del traslado o la retención y por lo tanto debería considerarse en el marco del artículo 3. Véanse:

Australia
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 312];

Francia
CA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 897];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 54].

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1014].

Aunque la jurisprudencia inglesa había establecido claramente que el consentimiento debía ser considerado a la luz del artículo 13(1) a), ninguno de los miembros de las 2 salas del Tribunal de Apelaciones parecía estar enteramente convencido de esta posición.

Del mismo modo, puede hacerse referencia a ejemplos donde los jueces de primera instancia no consideraron la distinción del artículo 13(1) a), pero en los que el consentimiento, en términos de una conformidad inicial con la medida, se ha considerado relevante para la determinacion de la ilicitud. Véanse:

Canadá
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 969];

Suiza
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 425]

Reino Unido - Escocia
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 186].

El caso no fue considerado a la luz de la distinción de los artículos 3 y 13(1) a), pero dado que el padre había consentido el traslado, se entendió que no había habido ilicitud.

La opinión de la mayoría es ahora, sin embargo, que se debería considerar el consentimiento con relación al artículo 13(1) a). Véanse:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 830];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Referncia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 53];

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 267];

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293 [Referncia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 591];

Irlanda
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 287].

Reino Unido - Escocia
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 997];

Para una discusión sobre estas cuestiones, ver Beaumont y McEleavy, Convenio de La Haya sobre la Sustracción Internacional de Menores, OUP, 1999 p. 132 ss.

Establecimiento del consentimiento

Se han aplicado diferentes estándares cuando se trata de determinar la aplicación de la excepción del artículo 13(1) a) fundada en el consentimiento.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En una de las primeras decisiones de primera instancia se sostuvo que, en circunstancias normales, las pruebas claras y contundentes requeridas deberían constar por escrito o al menos ser prueba documental. Véase:

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 37].

Esta visión estricta no se ha repetido en casos ingleses de primera instancia posteriores. Véanse:

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 53];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 55].

En Re K. se sostuvo que aunque el consentimiento debe ser real, positivo e inequívoco, podría haber circunstancias en las cuales un tribunal podría concluir que se hubiese prestado consentimiento, aunque no por escrito. Asimismo, podría haber casos en los que el consentimiento se podría inferir de la conducta.

Alemania
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491].

Se requieren pruebas contundentes para establecer la existencia de consentimiento.

Irlanda
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 817].

La resolución adoptada en Re K. fue respaldado por la Corte Suprema de Irlanda.

Países Bajos
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader) en H. (de moeder) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NL 318].

El consentimiento no tiene que ser para una estancia permanente. La única cuestión es que debe haber consentimiento y que haya sido acreditado de manera convincente.

Sudáfrica
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 900].

El consentimiento podría ser expreso o tácito.

Suiza

5P.367/2005 /ast; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841];

5P.380/2006 /blb; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 895];

5P.1999/2006 /blb; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 896].

La Corte Suprema de Suiza ha sostenido con respecto al consentimiento y la aceptación posterior, que el padre privado del menor debe pretar su consentimiento de manera clara, explícita o tácita, a un cambio duradero en la residencia del menor. A estos efectos, el sustractor tiene la carga de producir pruebas fácticas que lleven a que esa creencia sea plausible.

Estados Unidos de América
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 808].

Debe haber una evaluación subjetiva de lo que estaba contemplando verdaderamente el padre solicitante. También se debe considerar el carácter y el alcance del consentimiento.