CASE

No full text available

Case Name

V.L.K., 11. januar 2002, 13. afdeling, B-2939-01

INCADAT reference

HC/E/DK 519

Court

Country

DENMARK

Name

Vestre Landsret; High Court, Western Division

Level

Appellate Court

States involved

Requesting State

ISRAEL

Requested State

DENMARK

Decision

Date

11 January 2002

Status

Final

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

Order

Return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

3 12 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

-

Other provisions
§ 10 and § 11 in the Danish Act on International Enforcement of Decisions concerning Custody of Children and Restoration of Custody of Children etc. (International Child Abduction)
Authorities | Cases referred to

-

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Risks associated with the child's State of habitual residence

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The parents were married from 1985 to 1987 and during this time lived in Israel. After the divorce the mother left Israel, but after some time the parents resumed their relationship, and in 1991 they re-settled in Israel.

The child, a boy, was born in March 1994. On 13 October 2001 the mother brought the child to Denmark without the father's knowledge. Thus the child was 7 years old at the time of the alleged wrongful removal. The mother informed the father that she and the child did not intend to return to Israel.

At the end of October 2001 the Israeli central authority forwarded an application on behalf of the father for the return of the child. A Danish county court decided in accordance with Article 15 to request a ruling as to whether the removal was wrongful within the meaning of Article 3.

In November 2001 a Family Court in Israel ruled that the removal was wrongful. On 7 December 2001 a Danish county court ordered the return of the child to Israel. The mother appealed.

Ruling

Return ordered; the removal was wrongful and none of the exceptions had been proved to the standard required under the Convention.

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The mother stated that the security situation in Israel, especially after 11 September 2001, entailed a great risk and danger to the civilian population and this was part of her reason for going to Denmark. She claimed that there was a grave risk that the child’s return to Israel would expose him to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place him in an intolerable situation. In this she referred to the travel advice posted on the British Foreign Office website: ”We strongly advise against travel to the West Bank and Gaza, to the Sheba’s Farm/Har Dov section of the Israel/Lebanon border, and to the Israel/Gaza border areas. There are continuing serious clashes between Israelis and Palestinians in several locations throughout the West Bank and Gaza. Terrorist attacks within Israel and the Occupied Territoriums, including Jerusalem, continue. The risk of further unpredictable and indiscrimanate attacks remains very high. Car and suicide bombs have been used and targets include crowded public areas and public transport. (…) The risk of terrorist bomb attacks in Israel and the Occupied Territoriums including Jerusalem is very high during the present crisis in the Middle East Peace Process. Terrorist targets include crowded public areas such as shopping malls, busy streets, bars, nightclubs, restaurants and public transport. Car bombs and suicide bombers have been used against these types of targets…” The father replied that the situation in Israel had not changed considerably since the family settled in Israel for the first time in the 1980’s, or since 11 September 2001. He stated that Article 13 (1)(b) could not be applied only because he was living in Israel. The Danish court ordered that "the fact that a State has been subject to terrorist attacks or that there is a general risk of future terrorist attacks does not in itself pose such a concrete, serious threat to the child’s psychological and physical health as mentioned in § 11 (2) in the Danish Act on International Enforcement of Decisions concerning Custody of Children and Restoration of Custody of Children etc. (International Child Abduction) and in Article 13 (1)(b) in the Hague Convention. The fact that a State is at war or in a warlike condition may, on the other hand, on the basis of a concrete assessment result in the judgment that such a concrete and serious threat as mentioned in the two abovementioned provisions exists so that the return of the child can be refused. In the recent weeks in several Israeli cities there have been a number of Palestinian suicide attacks against random Israeli civilians with a large number of victims. The Israeli military has made retaliation attacks as well; also resulting in victims. The court does, however, conclude that the security situation in Israel – no matter of the launch of the Palestinian Intifada in September 2000 and the recent terrorist attacks – has not changed considerably. Furthermore, the risk of bomb attacks is considered to be of a general character and has been concentrated in public places. Incidentally, this risk has been tolerated by the mother until she left the country on 13 October 2001." It is therefore ordered that the child must be returned to his father.

INCADAT comment

Risks associated with the child's State of habitual residence

Article 13(1)(b) has on occasion been raised not with regard to a specific risk directed at the individual child, but as the result of general circumstances prevailing in the State of habitual residence.

In the well-known US appellate case of Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir. 1996) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 82], it was held, inter alia, that a grave risk could only exist when the return would put the child in imminent danger prior to the resolution of a custody dispute, e.g. by returning the child to a war zone or famine area.

This argument has been raised most frequently with regard to Israel.

Return to Israel

Courts have been divided over whether a return to Israel would expose a child to a grave risk of harm, but a clear majority has taken the view that it would not, see:

Argentina
A. v. A. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AR 487]

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 995]

Belgium
No 03/3585/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/BE 547]

Canada
Docket No 1 F 3709/00; C., 4 December 2001, Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, Court File No 01-FA-10575

Denmark
V.L.K., 11. januar 2002, 13. afdeling, B-2939-01 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DK 519]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

France
CA Aix en Provence, 8 octobre 2002, No de RG 02/14917 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 509]

Germany
1 F 3709/00, Familiengericht Zweibrücken, 25 January 2001 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 392]

United States of America
Freier v. Freier, 969 F. Supp. 436 (E.D. Mich. 1996) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 133]

However, the argument has been upheld on several occasions:

Australia
Janine Claire Genish-Grant and Director-General Department of Community Services [2002] FamCA 346 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 458]

United States of America
Silverman v. Silverman, 2002 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 8313 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 481] (see however: Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 530])  

Return to Zimbabwe

The highest jurisdiction in the United Kingdom, the House of Lords, rejected in 2008 a submission that the moral and political climate in Zimbabwe was such that any child would be at grave risk of psychological harm, or should not be expected to tolerate having to live there.

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55 [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

Return to Mexico

CA Rennes, 28 juin 2011, No de RG 11/02685 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 1129]

The mother mentioned the pollution of Mexico City, the insecurity due to crime in the Mexico City metropolis, and earthquake risks. She did not, however, show how these risks affected the children personally and directly. She had not mentioned those factors as justification for her decision to move to France, in a document sent to the father in 2010, but had referred to financial and family difficulties. In addition, the Court of Appeal noted that these factors had not deterred her from living in Mexico from 1998 to 2010 and raising two children there. It further noted that the mother had not seen fit to apply to the Mexican authorities for permission to move to France with the children, without explaining the reasons which in her view could jeopardise her right to a fair trial in Mexico.

The Court of Appeal made it clear that it did not affirm that the pleas raised by the mother were groundless. They might be used in connection with the issue of custody, but were not a sufficient proof of a grave risk.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Faits

Les parents avaient été mariés de 1985 à 1987, période pendant laquelle ils vivaient en Israël. Peu après leur divorce, la mère quitta le pays, mais les parents se réconcilièrent et en 1991, se ré-installèrent ensemble en Israël.

L'enfant, un garçon, naquit en mars 1994. Le 13 octobre 2001, la mère l'emmena au Danemark sans que le père le sache, puis informa ce cernier qu'ils ne retourneraient pas en Israël.

Fin octobre 2001, l'Autorité centrale israélienne transmit à son homologue une demande en vue du retour de l'enfant. Un juge cantonal danois décida de requérir, sur le fondement de l'article 15, une déclaration selon laquelle le déplacement était illicite.

En novembre 2001, un juge aux affaires familiales israélien déclara le déplacement illicite. Le 7 décembre 2001, le tribunal danois ordonna le retour de l'enfant. La mère interjeta appel.

Dispositif

Retour ordonné ; le déplacement était illicite et aucune des exceptions ne s'appliquait.

Motifs

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

La mère estimait que la sécurité en Israël, surtout après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001, était telle que les populations civiles vivant dans le pays se trouvaient en grand danger ; selon elle, cette situation était en partie la motivation de son départ. Elle prétendait que le retour de l'enfant dans ce pays serait de nature à l'exposer à un risque grave de danger physique ou psychologique ou à une situation intolérable. Elle faisait notamment référence aux conseils en matière de voyage qui avaient été publiés par le ministère britannique des affaires étrangères : ”Nous conseillons vivement de ne pas aller en Cisjordanie et dans la bande de Gaza, dans la région de la ferme de Sheba/Har Dov à la frontière libano-israélienne et dans les zones frontalières entre Israël et Gaza. Des conflits violents sont continuellement recencés entre israéliens et palestiniens en divers endroits de la Cisjordanie et de la bande de Gaza. Les attaques terroristes continuent en Israël et dans les territoires occupés, y compris à Jerusalem. Le risque d'attaques imprévisibles et aveugles reste très grand. Les attentats suicide et à la voiture piégée sont utilisés contre des zones fréquentées et les transports publics. (…) Le risque d'attentat terroriste en Israël et dans les territoires occupés est très grand en cette période de crise du processus de paix au Moyen-Orient. Les cibles incluent les zones très fréquentées telles que les centres commerciaux, les rues commerciales, les bars, les boites de nuit, les restaurants et les transports publics. Des attentats suicides ou à la voiture piégée ont été utilisés contre toutes ces cibles …” Selon le père, la situation n'avait pas sensiblement changé depuis que la famille s'était installée en Israël pour la première fois dans les années 1980, ni depuis le 11 septembre 2001. L'article 13 alinéa 1 b ne pouvait être appliqué simplement parce qu'il vivait en Israël. La cour danoise estima que le fait qu'un Etat fasse l'objet d'attaques terroristes ou risque d'en être la cible ne suffit pas à créer un danger sérieux et concret pour la santé physique et psychologique d'un enfant au sens de l'article 11 paragraphe 2 de la loi danoise mettant en oeuvre la Convention de La Haye et l'article 13 alinéa 1 b de cette Convention. Le fait qu'un Etat soit en situation de guerre ou proche d'une situation de guerre peut toutefois conduire à l'application des dispositions sus-mentionnées si une menace concrète et sérieuse existe et a été identifiée à la suite d'un examen de la situation concrète. La cour reconnut qu'Israël avait été l'objet de nombreuses attaques suicides dans un passé récent, lesquels avaient fait de nombreuses victimes innocentes ; cela avait donné lieu à des attaques de rétorsion de la part d'Israël qui avaient elles aussi causé des victimes. Toutefois, la cour estima que la situation sécuritaire n'avait pas fondamentalement changé depuis le début de l'Intifada de septembre 2000 et les attaques du 11 Septembre. En outre, le risque d'attentat était un risque d'ordre général qui affectait essentiellement les zones publiques. Ce risque avait d'ailleurs été toléré par la mère jusqu'à son départ en octobre 2001. Dès lors, le retour de l'enfant fut ordonné.

Commentaire INCADAT

Risques inhérents à l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant

Une exception de l'article 13(1)(b) a parfois été invoquée mettant en cause non pas un risque individuel pour l'enfant mais résultant des conditions de vie dans l'État de la résidence habituelle.

Dans l'arrêt d'appel fameux rendu aux États-Unis d'Amérique dans Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir. 1996) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 82], la Cour constata entre autres qu'un risque grave ne pouvait être pris en compte que lorsque le retour est de nature à exposer l'enfant à un danger immédiat pouvant se matérialiser avant la résolution de la question de la garde, par exemple dans le cas où l'enfant est renvoyé dans une zone de guerre ou de famine.

La question s'est notamment posée au regard d'un retour en Israël.

Retour en Israël

La question de savoir si le retour d'enfants en Israël est de nature à les exposer à un risque grave de danger a divisé les tribunaux appelés à se prononcer sur ce point. Une majorité de juridictions a considéré que ce n'était pas le cas. Voir :

Argentine
A. v. A [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AR 487]

Australie
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 995]

Belgique
N° 03/3585/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 17/4/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 547]

Canada
Docket No 1 F 3709/00; C., 4 décembre 2001, Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, Court File No 01-FA-10575

Danemark
V.L.K., 11. januar 2002, 13. afdeling, B-2939-01, Vestre Landsret; High Court, Western Division [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DK 519]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 469]

France
CA Aix en Provence, 8 octobre 2002, No de RG 02/14917 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 509]

Allemagne
1 F 3709/00, Familiengericht Zweibrücken (Family Court), 25 January 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 392]

États-Unis d'Amérique
Freier v. Freier, 969 F. Supp. 436 (E.D. Mich. 1996) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 133]

Toutefois, l'argument a été accueilli dans certaines affaires :

Australie
Janine Claire Genish-Grant and Director-General Department of Community Services [2002] FamCA 346 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 458]

États-Unis d'Amérique
Silverman v. Silverman, 2002 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 8313 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 481] (voir néanmoins Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 530]

Retour au Zimbabwe

La Chambre des Lords britannique, instance suprême du Royaume-Uni a rejeté l'argument selon lequel le climat politique et moral était tel au Zimbabwe que le retour d'enfants dans ce pays serait de nature à les exposer à un risque grave de danger psychologique ou à une situation intolérable.

Re M. (Abduction: Zimbabwe) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Retour au Mexique

CA Rennes, 28 juin 2011, No de RG 11/02685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 1129]

La mère citait la pollution existant à Mexico, l'insécurité générée par la délinquance dans la métropole de Mexico ainsi que les risques sismiques. Toutefois elle ne montrait pas en quoi ces risques touchaient personnellement et directement les enfants. Elle n'avait pas mentionné ces facteurs pour justifier son choix de s'établir en France dans un document adressé au père en 2010, mais avait fait état de difficultés financières et familiales. En outre, la Cour nota que ces facteurs ne l'avaient pas dissuadé de vivre à Mexico de 1998 à 2010 et d'y avoir élevé deux enfants. Elle releva encore que la mère n'avait pas cru opportun de demander l'autorisation aux autorités mexicaines de s'établir en France avec les enfants, sans expliquer les raisons qui, selon elle, pourraient compromettre son droit à un procès équitable au Mexique.

La Cour clarifia qu'elle n'affirmait pas que les éléments soulevés par la mère étaient dénués de fondement. Ils pourraient être éventuellement utilisés dans le cadre de la question de la garde, mais ne suffisaient pas à établir l'existence d'un risque grave de danger.

(Auteur du résumé : Peter McEleavy, Avril 2013)

Hechos

Los padres estuvieron casados desde 1985 hasta 1987 y durante ese tiempo vivieron en Israel. Después del divorcio, la madre se fue de Israel pero después de algún tiempo los padres retomaron su relación y en 1991 se volvieron a establecer en Israel.

El menor, un varón, nació en marzo de 1994. El 13 de octubre de 2001 la madre llevó al menor a Dinamarca sin el conocimiento del padre. Por lo tanto, el menor tenía 7 años de edad en el momento del supuesto traslado ilícito. La madre informó al padre que ni ella ni el niño tenían intenciones de regresar a Israel.

A fines de octubre de 2001 la Autoridad Central israelí envió una solicitud en nombre del padre para obtener la restitución del menor. Un Tribunal de Condado danés decidió conforme al artículo 15 solicitar un fallo acerca de si el traslado era ilícito en los términos del artículo 3.

En noviembre de 2001 un Tribunal de Familia de Israel determinó que el traslado era ilícito. El 7 de diciembre de 2001 un Tribunal de Condado danés ordenó la restitución del menor a Israel. La madre apeló.

Fallo

Restitución ordenada; el traslado fue ilícito y ninguna de las excepciones se probó en la medida exigida en el marco del Convenio.

Fundamentos

Grave riesgo - art. 13(1)(b)

La madre declaró que la situación de seguridad en Israel, especialmente después del 11 de septiembre de 2001, implicaba un gran riesgo y un gran peligro para la población civil y esto fue lo que en parte motivó su traslado a Dinamarca. Afirmó que existía un grave riesgo de que la restitución del menor a Israel lo expusiera a un daño físico y psicológico o de otro modo lo colocara en una situación intolerable. Con respecto a esto hizo referencia al aviso de viajes publicado en el sitio web del Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores británico: “Aconsejamos firmemente no viajar a Cisjordania y a Gaza, al área de Har Dov/Granja de Sheba de la frontera de Israel y el Líbano, y a las áreas limítrofes de Israel y Gaza. Hay continuos y graves enfrentamientos entre israelíes y palestinos en diversos lugares a lo largo de Cisjordania y Gaza. Continuan los ataques terroristas en Israel y los territorios ocupados, incluyendo a Jerusalem. Sigue siendo alto el riesgo de más ataques impredecibles e indiscriminados. Se han utilizado ataques suicidas con autobombas y los objetivos incluyen áreas llenas de gente y el transporte público. (…) El riesgo de ataques terroristas con bombas en Israel y los territorios ocupados, incluida Jerusalem, es muy grande durante la presente crisis del proceso de paz en Medio Oriente. Los objetivos terroristas abarcan áreas públicas atestadas de gente tal como los grandes centros comerciales, las calles concurridas, bares, clubes nocturnos y el transporte público. Se han usado autos bomba y terroristas suicidas contra los mencionados objetivos …” El padre respondió que la situación en Israel no había cambiado considerablemente desde que la familia se estableciera allí la primera vez en los años 80, o desde el 11 de septiembre de 2001. Declaró asimismo que no podía aplicarse el artículo 13, apartado 1, letra b), solamente por el hecho de vivir en Israel. El tribunal danés ordenó que “el hecho de que el Estado haya estado sujeto a ataques terroristas o de que haya un riesgo generalizado de futuros ataques terroristas no representa en sí mismo una amenaza grave y concreta para la salud física y psicológica del menor tal como se menciona en § 11 (2) de la Ley de Dinamarca sobre Ejecución Internacional de Decisiones en materia de Custodia de Menores y Restablecimiento de la Custodia de Menores etc. (Sustracción Internacional de Menores) y en el artículo 13, apartado 1, letra b) del Convenio de la Haya. Por otra parte, el hecho de que un Estado esté en guerra o en estado de guerra permitirá concluir, sobre la base de una evaluación concreta, que la amenaza concreta y grave tal como se menciona en las dos disposiciones precedentes existe, de manera que puede no hacerse lugar a la restitución del menor. Hace pocas semanas se han producido una serie de ataques suicida palestinos en diversas ciudades israelitas contra civiles israelitas al azar cuyo resultado ha sido un gran número de víctimas. El ejército israelí también ha llevado a cabo ataques en represalia; lo cual también produjo víctimas. Sin embargo, la conclusión del tribunal es que la situación de seguridad en Israel – independientemente del lanzamiento de la Intifada palestina en Septiembre de 2000 y los recientes ataques terroristas – no ha cambiado en forma considerable. Más aún, se considera que el riesgo de ataques con bombas es de carácter general y ha estado concentrado en lugares públicos. Incidentalmente, el riesgo ha sido tolerado por la madre hasta que se fue del país el 13 de octubre de 2001”. Por lo tanto, se ordena que el menor sea restituido a su padre.

Comentario INCADAT

Riesgos asociados a la situación en el Estado de residencia habitual del niño

En algunas ocasiones, la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) ha sido invocada, no con respecto a un riesgo específico para el menor, sino a la situación imperante en el Estado de residencia habitual.

En la célebre sentencia de apelación de los Estados Unidos Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir. 1996) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 82], el tribunal declaró, entre otras cosas, que solo podía existir un riesgo grave cuando el retorno pudiera exponer al menor a un peligro inminente antes de la resolución de la cuestión de la custodia, por ejemplo, si se restituyera al menor a una zona azotada por la guerra o la hambruna.

Esta cuestión se ha planteado sobre todo con respecto a Israel.

Retorno a Israel

La cuestión de si el retorno de un menor a Israel lo expondría a un riesgo grave ha generado divisiones entre los tribunales. Sin embargo, la mayoría ha considerado que no sería el caso. Véanse:

Argentina
A. v. A. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AR 487]

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 995]

Bélgica
No 03/3585/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 547]

Canadá
Docket No 1 F 3709/00; C., 4 December 2001, Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, Court File No 01-FA-10575

Dinamarca
V.L.K., 11. januar 2002, 13. afdeling, B-2939-01 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DK 519]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Francia
CA Aix en Provence, 8 octobre 2002, No de RG 02/14917 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 509]

Alemania
1 F 3709/00, Familiengericht Zweibrücken, 25 January 2001 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 392]

Estado Unidos de América
Freier v. Freier, 969 F. Supp. 436 (E.D. Mich. 1996) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 133]

No obstante, el argumento ha sido acogido en varias ocasiones:

Australia
Janine Claire Genish-Grant and Director-General Department of Community Services [2002] FamCA 346 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 458]

Estado Unidos de América
Silverman v. Silverman, 2002 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 8313 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 481] (see however: Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 530])  

Retorno a Zimbabue

En 2008, la Cámara de los Lores, máxima instancia en el Reino Unido, rechazó un argumento según el cual el ambiente político y social en Zimbabue era de una naturaleza tal que el retorno de niños a ese país los expondría a un riesgo grave de daño psicológico o a una situación intolerable.

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55 [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]

Retorno a México

CA Rennes, 28 juin 2011, No de RG 11/02685 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1129]

La madre alegó la contaminación de la ciudad de México, el nivel de inseguridad a causa de la delincuencia en dicha metrópolis, y el riesgo de terremotos. No demostró, sin embargo, cómo estos riesgos afectaban en forma personal y directa a los menores. En un documento que había enviado al padre en 2010, en lugar de mencionar esos factores como los motivos de su decisión de mudarse a Francia, se había referido a dificultades de índole económica y familiar. Asimismo, el tribunal de apelaciones señaló que esos factores no le habían impedido vivir en México de 1998 a 2010 y criar allí a dos niños. Indicó, además, que la madre no había estimado conveniente solicitar autorización a las autoridades mexicanas para mudarse a Francia con sus hijos, sin explicar las razones que, a su entender, podían poner en peligro su derecho a un procedimiento justo en México.

El tribunal de apelaciones aclaró que no estaba afirmando que las pretensiones de la madre carecieran de fundamento. Podrían utilizarse cuando se tratara la cuestión de fondo de la custodia, pero no constituían prueba suficiente de riesgo grave.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)