CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 68

Court

Country

AUSTRALIA

Name

Full Court of the Family Court of Australia at Sydney

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Barblett D.C.J., Ellis and Lindenmayer JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

NEW ZEALAND

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

11 July 1996

Status

Final

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

Order

Appeal allowed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1)(b) 13(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(1)(b) 13(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228; Police Commissioner of South Australia v. Temple (1993) FLC 92-365; Re Bassi,; Bassi and Director General, Department of Community Services (1994) FLC 92-465; McCall and McCall; State Central Authority (Applicant); Attorney-General (Intervenor) (1995) FLC 92-551; S. v. S. (Child Abduction) (Child's Views) [1992] 2 FLR 492; Urness v. Minto 1994 SLT 988.

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
Actual Exercise

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Primary Carer Abductions
Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child, a girl, was 7 3/4 at the date of the alleged wrongful retention. The parents were separated. No custody orders existed in relation to the girl who had lived in New Zealand all of her life. In August 1989 the mother had requested that the paternal grandparents take over day to day care of the child.

On 4 December 1995 the grandparents took the girl to Australia. She was due to return on 15 January 1996 but this was extended to 17 March. The father joined them in Australia that February. In March the grandparents decided to keep the child in Australia.

A return application was filed on 15 May.

On 23 July 1996 the Family Court dismissed the father's application for the return of the child. The Australian Central Authority appealed.

Ruling

Appeal allowed and return ordered; there had been a wrongful retention and none of the exceptions had been established.

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

Actual Exercise of Custody Rights The question is not whether there is any evidence the mother abandoned her rights of custody but rather whether, at the relevant time, the rights were actually exercised or would have been but for the retention. By getting the paternal grandparents to discharge, on her behalf, her duty to her daughter, the mother was not surrendering or waiving her custody rights or conferring such rights upon the grandparents; she was in fact actually exercising her rights of custody. The retention of the girl in Australia interfered with the mother's right to determine the child's place of residence and was therefore wrongful.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The Full Court endorsed the view expressed in the English case C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 2 All ER 465 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34], that a parent should not be permitted to create a psychologically harmful situation and then to rely on it as a defense.

Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

The relevant objection is an objection to being returned to the country of habitual residence, not to living with a particular parent. However, there may be cases where these matters are so linked that they cannot be separated. The instant case is not such an example.

INCADAT comment

Actual Exercise

Courts in a variety of Contracting States have afforded a wide interpretation to what amounts to the actual exercise of rights of custody, see:

Australia
Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 68];

Austria
8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof, 30/10/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 548];

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 545];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. Cour d'Appel at Aix en Provence (6e Ch.) 23 March 1989, 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529 note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° 5704759 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 704];

CA Aix en Provence 8/10/2002, L. v. Ministère Public, Mme B et Mesdemoiselles L (N° de rôle 02/14917) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 509];

Germany
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 822];

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 491];

New Zealand
The Chief Executive of the Department for Courts for R. v. P., 20 September 1999, Court of Appeal of New Zealand [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 304];

United Kingdom - Scotland
O. v. O. 2002 SC 430 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 507].

In the above case the Court of Session stated that it might be going too far to suggest, as the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit had done in Friedrich v Friedrich that only clear and unequivocal acts of abandonment might constitute failure to exercise custody rights. However, Friedrich was fully approved of in a later Court of Session judgment, see:

S. v S., 2003 SLT 344 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 577].

This interpretation was confirmed by the Inner House of the Court of Session (appellate court) in:

AJ. V. FJ. 2005 CSIH 36, 2005 1 S.C. 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803].

Switzerland
K. v. K., Tribunal cantonal de Horgen [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CZ 299];

449/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 433];

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953];

United States of America
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 82];

Sealed Appellant v. Sealed Appellee, 394 F.3d 338 (5th Cir. 2004), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 779];

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

See generally Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E., 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 84 et seq.

Primary Carer Abductions

The issue of how to respond when a taking parent who is a primary carer threatens not to accompany a child back to the State of habitual residence if a return order is made, is a controversial one.

There are examples from many Contracting States where courts have taken a very strict approach so that, other than in exceptional situations, the Article 13(1)(b) exception has not been upheld where the non-return argument has been raised, see:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 764]

In this case, a non-return order was made since the facts were exceptional. There had been a genuine threat to the mother, which had put her quite obviously and rightfully in fear for her safety if she returned to Israel. The mother was taken to Israel on false pretences, sold to the Russian Mafia and re-sold to the father who forced her into prostitution. She was locked in, beaten by the father, raped and threatened. The mother was genuinely in a state of fear and could not be expected to return to Israel. It would be wholly inappropriate to send the child back without his mother to a father who had been buying and selling women and running a prostitution business.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 269]

However, in a more recent English Court of Appeal judgment, the C. v. C. approach has been refined:

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

In this case, it was ruled that a mother's refusal to return was capable of amounting to a defence because the refusal was not an act of unreasonableness, but came about as a result of an illness she was suffering from. It may be noted, however, that a return order was nevertheless still made. In this context reference may also be made to the decisions of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1068] and Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1147], in which it was accepted that the anxieties of a respondent mother about return, which were not based upon objective risk to her but nevertheless were of such intensity as to be likely, in the event of a return, to destabilise her parenting of the child to the point at which the child's situation would become intolerable, could in principle meet the threshold of the Article 13(1)(b) exception.

Germany
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Previously a much more liberal interpretation had been adopted:
Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 323]

Switzerland
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 1179]

New Zealand
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770]

United Kingdom - Scotland
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 26]

United States of America
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USs 97]

In other Contracting States, the approach taken with regard to non-return arguments has varied:

Australia
In Australia, early Convention case law exhibited a very strict approach adopted with regard to non-return arguments, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]
 
In State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 283], the Family Court of Australia at Melbourne did find the grave risk of harm exception to be established where the mother would not return, but in this case the mother had been denied entry into the United States of America, the child's State of habitual residence.

Following the judgment of the High Court of Australia (the highest court in the Australian judicial system) in the joint appeals DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 346, 347], greater attention has been focused on the post-return situation facing abducted children.

In the context of a primary-carer taking parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence see: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 544]. 

France
In French case law, a permissive approach to Article 13(1)(b) has been replaced with a much more restrictive interpretation. For examples of the initial approach, see:

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 498]

And for examples of the stricter interpretation, see:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
In Israeli case law there are contrasting examples of the judicial response to non-return arguments:
 
Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 832]

in contrast with:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 833]

Poland
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 700]

The Supreme Court noted that it would not be in the child's best interests if she were deprived of her mother's care, were the latter to choose to remain in Poland. However, it equally affirmed that if the child were to stay in Poland it would not be in her interests to be deprived of the care of her father. For these reasons, the Court concluded that it could not be assumed that ordering the return of the child would place her in an intolerable situation.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 701]

The Supreme Court specified that the frequently used argument of the child's potential separation from the taking parent, did not, in principle, justify the application of the exception. It held that where there were no objective obstacles to the return of a taking parent, then it could be assumed that the taking parent considered his own interest to be more important than those of the child.

The Court added that a taking parent's fear of being held criminally liable was not an objective obstacle to return, as the taking parent should have been aware of the consequences of his actions. The situation with regard to infants was however more complicated. The Court held that the special bond between mother and baby only made their separation possible in exceptional cases, and this was so even if there were no objective obstacles to the mother's return to the State of habitual residence. The Court held that where the mother of an infant refused to return, whatever the reason, then the return order should be refused on the basis of Article 13(1)(b). On the facts, return was ordered.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UY 1185]

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
There are decisions of the ECrtHR which have endorsed a strict approach with regard to the compatibility of Hague Convention exceptions and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Some of these cases have considered arguments relevant to the issue of grave risk of harm, including where an abductor has indicated an unwillingness to accompany the returning child, see:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1169]

In this case, the ECrtHR upheld a challenge by the left-behind father that the refusal of the Turkish courts to return his child led to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The ECrtHR stated that whilst very young age was a criterion to be taken into account to determine the child's interest in an abduction case, it could not be considered by itself a sufficient ground, in relation to the requirements of the Hague Convention, to justify dismissal of a return application.

Recourse has been had to expert evidence to assist in ascertaining the potential consequences of the child being separated from the taking parent

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1177]

However, it must equally be noted that since the Grand Chamber ruling in Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, there are examples of a less strict approach being followed. The latter ruling had emphasised the best interests of the individual abducted child in the context of an application for return and the ascertainment of whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation as well as a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, see:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]; and Grand Chamber ruling X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1171]

In this case, a majority found that the return of a child to the United States of America would lead to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The decision-making process of the Belgian Appellate Court as regards Article 13(1)(b) was held not to have met the procedural requirements inherent in Article 8 of the ECHR. The two dissenting judges noted, however, that the danger referred to in Article 13 should not consist only of the separation of the child from the taking parent.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Faits

L'enfant, une fille, avait 7 ans 3/4 au moment du non-retour illicite allégué. Les parents étaient séparés. Il n'existait aucune décision de justice relative à la garde de la fillette qui avait vécu toute sa vie en Nouvelle-Zélande. En août 1989, la mère avait demandé que les grands-parents paternels prennent en charge les soins quotidiens de l'enfant.

Le 4 décembre 1995, les grands-parents ont emmené l'enfant en Australie. Elle devait rentrer le 15 janvier 1996 mais cette date a été retardée au 17 mars. Le père les y a rejoint en février. En mars, les grands-parents ont décidé de garder l'enfant en Australie.

Une demande de retour a été présentée le 15 mai.

Le 23 juillet 1996, la Family Court a rejeté la demande de retour présentée par le père. L'Autorité centrale australienne a fait appel.

Dispositif

L'appel a été admis et retour ordonné ; le non-retour était illicite et aucune des exceptions prévues n'a pu être établie.

Motifs

Droit de garde - art. 3

Exercise effectif du droit de garde Il ne s'agit pas de prouver que la mère a renoncé à son droit de garde mais plutôt de savoir si, pendant la période en question, ce droit a été effectivement exercé ou aurait pu l'être s'il n'y avait pas eu le non-retour. En demandant aux grands-parents paternels de se charger à sa place de ses devoirs envers sa fille, la mère n'abandonnait pas son droit de garde ni ne renonçait à ce droit. Elle ne donnait pas non plus ce droit aux grands-parents; en fait, elle exerçait effectivement son droit de garde. Le maintien de la fillette en Australie interférait avec le droit de la mère de décider du lieu de résidence de l'enfant et était par conséquent illicite.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

La Full Court a adopté le point de vue exprimé dans l'affaire anglaise C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 2 All ER 465 [INCADAT cite : HC/E/UKe 34], selon lequel un parent ne doit pas être autorisé à créer une certaine situation psychologique et ensuite s'appuyer sur elle.

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)

Une opposition pertinente est une opposition au retour à la résidence habituelle et non pour vivre avec un parent en particular. Toutefois, il peut y avoir des cas où ces aspects sont tellement liés qu'ils ne peuvent être dissociés. Le cas présent n'en fait pas partie.

Commentaire INCADAT

Exercice effectif de la garde

Les juridictions d'une quantité d'États parties ont également privilégié une interprétation large de la notion d'exercice effectif de la garde. Voir :

Australie
Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 68] ;

Autriche
8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof, 30/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548] ;

Belgique
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/BE 545] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [1996] 1 FCR 46, [1995] Fam Law 351 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 37] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. Cour d'Appel d'Aix en Provence (6e Ch.) 23 Mars 1989, 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529 note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704] ;

CA Aix en Provence 8/10/2002, L. v. Ministère Public, Mme B et Mesdemoiselles L (N° de rôle 02/14917) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 509] ;

Allemagne
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 822] ;

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 491] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
The Chief Executive of the Department for Courts for R. v. P., 20 September 1999, Court of Appeal of New Zealand [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 304] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
O. v. O. 2002 SC 430 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 507].

Dans cette décision, la « Court of Session », Cour suprême écossaise, estima que ce serait peut-être aller trop loin que de suggérer, comme les juges américains dans l'affaire Friedrich v. Friedrich, que seuls des actes d'abandon clairs et dénués d'ambiguïté pouvaient être interprétés comme impliquant que le droit de garde n'était pas exercé effectivement. Toutefois, « Friedrich » fut approuvée dans une affaire écossaise subséquente:

S. v. S., 2003 SLT 344 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 577].

Cette interprétation fut confirmée par la cour d'appel d'Écosse :

A.J. v. F.J. 2005 CSIH 36 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Suisse
K. v. K., 13 février 1992, Tribunal cantonal de Horgen [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/SZ 299] ;

449/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433];

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Friedrich v. Friedrich 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 82] ;

Sealed Appellant v. Sealed Appellee, 15 December 2004, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 779] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029].

Sur cette question, voir : P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, Oxford, 1999 p. 84 et seq.

Enlèvements par le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant

La question de la position à adopter dans les situations où le parent ravisseur est le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, et qu'il menace de ne pas rentrer avec l'enfant dans l'État de résidence habituelle si une ordonnance de retour est rendue, est controversée.

De nombreux États contractants ont adopté une position très stricte au terme de laquelle le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b) n'a été retenu que dans des circonstances exceptionnelles quand l'argument tendant au non-retour de l'enfant était invoqué. Voir :

Autriche
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

Dans cette affaire, les circonstances exceptionnelles ont résulté en une ordonnance de non-retour. La mère faisait face à une menace véritable qui lui faisait craindre légitimement pour sa sécurité si elle retournait en Israël. Elle avait été emmenée en Israël sous un faux prétexte, y avait été vendue à la mafia russe puis revendue au père, qui l'avait forcée à se prostituer. Elle avait alors été enfermée, battue par le père, violée et menacée. La mère était dans un réel état de peur, on ne pouvait attendre d'elle qu'elle retourne en Israël. Il aurait été complètement inapproprié de renvoyer l'enfant sans sa mère vers un père qui avait acheté et vendu des femmes, et dirigé des activités de prostitution.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

Toutefois, dans un jugement plus récent rendu par une Cour d'appel anglaise, la position adoptée en 1989 dans l'affaire C. v. C. fut précisée. Voir :

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Dans cette affaire, il fut décidé que le refus de la mère de retourner dans l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle était susceptible de déclencher le jeu de l'exception en ce qu'il n'était pas imputable à un comportement excessif mais à une maladie dont elle souffrait. Il convient de noter qu'une ordonnance de retour fut malgré tout rendue. On peut également mentionner à ce sujet les décisions de la Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni dans Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] et Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. Dans cette dernière affaire, il fut accepté que les angoisses d'une mère concernant son retour satisfaisaient le niveau de risque requis à l'article 13(1)(b) et justifiaient le jeu de cette exception quoiqu'elles n'étaient pas fondées sur un risque objectif. L'ampleur de ces angoisses était telle qu'elles lui auraient probablement causé des difficultés à assumer normalement son rôle de parent en cas de retour, au point de rendre la situation de l'enfant intolérable.

Allemagne
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Auparavant, une position beaucoup plus libérale avait été adoptée :

Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suisse
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Etats-Unis d'Amérique
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position adoptée quant aux arguments tendant au non-retour de l'enfant a varié :

Australie
En Australie, la jurisprudence ancienne témoigne d'une position initialement très stricte. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

Dans l'affaire State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], le Tribunal de Melbourne avait estimé qu'il y avait bien un risque grave de danger alors que la mère refusait de rentrer avec l'enfant. En l'espèce, toutefois, la mère ne pouvait pas retourner aux États-Unis, État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant, car les autorités de ce pays lui refusaient l'entrée sur le territoire.

Plus récemment, suite à la décision de la Cour suprême qui avait été saisie des appels joints dans D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], les tribunaux ont accordé une attention plus particulière à la situation à laquelle l'enfant allait devoir faire face après son retour.

Pour une illustration de ce phénomène dans une affaire où le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant refusait de rentrer avec lui dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle, voir : Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

France
Dans la jurisprudence française, l'interprétation permissive de l'article 13(1)(b) qui prévalait initialement a été remplacée par une interprétation beaucoup plus stricte. Pour une illustration de l'interprétation permissive initiale. Voir :

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

et pour une illustration de l'interprétation plus stricte, voir :

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israël
Il existe dans la jurisprudence israélienne des exemples contrastés du traitement des exceptions au retour :

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]  contrastant avec :

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Pologne
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Cour Suprême nota qu'il ne serait pas conforme à l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant de la priver des soins de sa mère, si celle-ci décidait de rester en Pologne. La Cour affirma cependant que si l'enfant devait rester en Pologne, il serait tout autant contraire à son intérêt d'être privée des soins de son père. Tenant compte de ces considérations, la Cour conclut qu'il ne pouvait pas être présumé qu'ordonner le retour de l'enfant la placerait dans une situation intolérable.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Cour suprême précisa que l'argument fréquemment avancé de la potentielle séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur ne justifiait pas, en principe, le jeu de l'exception. La Cour jugea qu'en l'absence d'obstacles objectifs au retour du parent ravisseur, on pouvait présumer que celui-ci accordait plus de valeur à ses propres intérêts qu'à ceux de l'enfant.

La Cour ajouta que la crainte pour le parent ravisseur de voir sa responsabilité pénale engagée ne constituait pas un obstacle objectif au retour, puisque celui-ci aurait dû avoir conscience des conséquences de ses actions. La situation était cependant plus compliquée s'agissant des nourrissons. La Cour estima que le lien spécial unissant la mère et le nourrisson ne rendait la séparation possible qu'en cas exceptionnel, et ce même en l'absence d'obstacle objectif au retour de la mère dans l'État de résidence habituelle. La Cour jugea que lorsque la mère d'un nourrisson refusait de revenir avec lui, quelles qu'en soient les raisons, alors le retour devait être refusé sur la base de l'article 13(1)(b). D'après les faits de l'espèce, le retour avait été ordonné.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
Il existe des décisions de la CourEDH adoptant une position stricte relativement à la compatibilité des exceptions de la Convention de La Haye avec la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH). Dans certaines de ces affaires, des arguments relatifs à l'exception pour risque grave étaient considérés, y compris lorsque le parent ravisseur indiquait son refus d'accompagner le retour de l'enfant. Voir :

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH confirma un recours du père à qui l'enfant avait été enlevé selon lequel les juridictions turques avaient commis une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH en refusant d'ordonner le retour de son enfant. La CourEDH jugea que, bien que le très jeune âge d'un enfant soit un critère à prendre en compte dans la détermination de son intérêt, cela ne constituait pas en soi, selon les exigences de la Convention de La Haye, un motif suffisant pour justifier le rejet d'une demande de retour.

Il a parfois été fait recours à des témoignages d'expert afin de faciliter l'évaluation des conséquences potentielles de la séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur. Voir :

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Cependant, il faut également noter que, depuis la décision de la Grande Chambre dans l'affaire Neulinger et Shuruk c Suisse, il est des exemples où une approche moins stricte est suivie. Dans le contexte d'une demande de retour, ce dernier jugement avait placé l'accent sur l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant enlevé et sur le fait de vérifier que les autorités nationales compétentes avaient conduit un examen détaillé de la situation familiale dans son ensemble ainsi qu'une appréciation équilibrée et raisonnable de tous les intérêts en jeu. Voir :

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; et décision de la Grand Chamber X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH estima à la majorité que le retour d'un enfant aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique entrainerait une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH. Il fut jugé que le processus de prise de décision de la Cour d'appel belge, en ce qui concerne l'article 13(1)(b), n'avait pas satisfait aux exigences procédurales posées par l'article 8 de la CEDH. Les deux juges dissidents notèrent cependant que le danger visé par l'article 13 ne saurait résulter de la seule séparation de l'enfant et du parent ravisseur.

(Auteur: Peter McEleavy, avril 2013)

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Hechos

La menor, era una niña de siete años y nueve meses a la fecha de la supuesta sustracción ilícita. Los padres estaban separados. No existían órdenes de custodia en relación con la menor que había vivido en Nueva Zelanda toda su vida. En agosto de 1989 la madre había solicitado que los abuelos paternos asumieran el cuidado cotidiano de la menor.

El 4 de diciembre de 1995 los abuelos llevaron a la niña a Australia. Ella debía regresar el 15 de enero de 1996 pero esto se extendió hasta el 17 de marzo. El padre se reunió con ellos en Australia ese mes de febrero. En marzo los abuelos decidieron quedarse con la menor en Australia.

El 15 de mayo se presentó una solicitud de restitución.

El 23 de julio de 1996, el tribunal de familia desestimó la solicitud de restitución de la menor presentada por el padre. La Autoridad Central de Australia apeló.

Fallo

Apelación concedida. Se ordenó la restitución; se había producido una retención ilícita y no se habían establecido ninguna de las excepciones.

Fundamentos

Derechos de custodia - art. 3

Ejercicio real de los derechos de Custodia La cuestión no es si hay pruebas de que la madre abandonó sus derechos de custodia sino más bien, si, en el momento pertinente, los derechos eran realmente ejercidos o lo habrían sido de no ser por la retención. Al encargar a los abuelos paternos, que en su nombre, ejercieran el deber de ella hacia su hija, la madre no estaba cediendo ni renunciando sus derechos de custodia o confiriendo tales derechos a los abuelos; en realidad estaba ejerciendo sus derechos de custodia. La retención de la niña en Australia interfirió con el derecho de la madre a determinar el lugar de residencia del menor y por lo tanto era ilícita.

Grave riesgo - art. 13(1)(b)

El tribunal en pleno respaldó la opinión expresada en el caso inglés C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 2 All ER 465 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34], de que no debe permitirse a un progenitor crear una situación psicológicamente perjudicial y después confiar en ella como defensa.

Objeciones del niño a la restitución - art. 13(2)

La objeción pertinente es una objeción a ser restituido al país de residencia habitual, no a vivir con un determinado progenitor. Sin embargo, puede haber casos en los que estas cuestiones están tan vinculadas que no pueden separarse. El caso presente no es un ejemplo de esto.

Comentario INCADAT

Ejercicio efectivo de los derechos de custodia

Los tribunales de diversos Estados contratantes le han asignado una interpretación amplia al concepto de ejercicio efectivo de los derechos de custodia. Véase:

Australia
Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 68];

Austria
8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof, 30/10/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548];

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 545];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878; [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 37];

Francia
CA Aix en Provence 23/03/1989, Ministère Public c. M. B., [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 62];

CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° 5704759 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 704];

CA Aix en Provence 8/10/2002, L. c. Ministère Public, Mme B et Mesdemoiselles L (N° de rôle 02/14917) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 509];

Alemania
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 822];

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Referencia INCADAT : HC/E/DE 491];

Nueva Zelanda
The Chief Executive of the Department for Courts for R. v. P., 20 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Apelaciones de Nueva Zelanda [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 304];

Reino Unido - Escocia
O. v. O. 2002 SC 430 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 507].

En este caso el Tribunal Superior de Justicia (Court of Session) afirmó que se podría estar yendo muy lejos al sugerir, al igual que el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos para el Sexto Circuito en Friedrich v. Friedrich, que solo actos claros e inequívocos de abandono podrían constituir el no ejercicio de derechos de custodia. Sin embargo, Friedrich fue plenamente aprobado en una sentencia posterior del Tribunal Superior de Justicia. Véase:

S. v S., 2003 SLT 344 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 577].

Esta interpretación fue ratificada por la Inner House of the Court of Session (tribunal de apelaciones) en:

A.J. v. F.J. 2005 CSIH 36, 2005 1 S.C. 428  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 803];

Suiza
K. v. K., Tribunal cantonal de Horgen [Referncia INCADAT: HC/E/SZ 299];

449/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne, [Referencia INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433];

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, [Referencia INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953];

Estados Unidos de América
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 82];

Sealed Appellant v. Sealed Appellee, 394 F.3d 338 (5th Cir. 2004), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf 779];

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 1029].

Ver, en general, Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E., The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, Oxford, 1999 en p. 84 y ss.

Sustracción por quien ejerce el cuidado principal del menor

Una cuestión controvertida es cómo responder cuando el padre que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor lo sustrae y amenaza con no acompañarlo de regreso al Estado de residencia habitual en caso de expedirse una orden de restitución.

Los tribunales de muchos Estados contratantes han adoptado un enfoque muy estricto, por lo que, salvo en situaciones muy excepcionales, se han rehusado a estimar la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) cuando se presenta este argumento relativo a la negativa del sustractor a regresar. Véanse:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 27/02/1996 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canadá
M.G. c. R.F., [2002] R.J.Q. 2132 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., [1999] R.D.F. 38 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

En este caso se dictó una resolución de no restitución porque los hechos eran excepcionales. Había habido una amenaza genuina a la madre, que justificadamente le generó temor por su seguridad si regresaba a Israel. Fue engañada y llevada a Israel, vendida a la mafia rusa y revendida al padre, quien la forzó a prostituirse. Fue encerrada, golpeada por el padre, violada y amenazada. Estaba realmente atemorizada, por lo que no podía esperarse que regresara a Israel. Habría sido totalmente inapropiado enviar al niño de regreso sin su madre a un padre que había estado comprando y vendiendo mujeres y llevando adelante un negocio de prostitución.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

No obstante, una sentencia más reciente del Tribunal de Apelaciones inglés ha refinado el enfoque del caso C. v. C.: Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] EWCA Civ 908, [2002] 3 FCR 43 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469].

En este caso, se resolvió que la negativa de una madre a restituir al menor era apta para configurar una defensa, puesto que no constituía un acto carente de razonabilidad, sino que surgía como consecuencia de una enfermedad que ella padecía. Cabe destacar, sin embargo, que aun así se expidió una orden de restitución. En este marco se puede hacer referencia a las sentencias del Tribunal Supremo del Reino Unido en Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] y Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. En estas decisiones se aceptó que el temor que una madre podía tener con respecto a la restitución ―aunque no estuviere fundado en riesgos objetivos, pero sí fuere de una intensidad tal como para considerar que el retorno podría afectar sus habilidades de cuidado al punto de que la situación del niño podría volverse intolerable―, en principio, podría ser suficiente para declarar configurada la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b).

Alemania
10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Anteriormente, se había adoptado una interpretación mucho más liberal: 17 UF 260/98, Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suiza
5P.71/2003 /min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P.65/2002/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referenia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007 /frs, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nueva Zelanda
K.S. v. LS. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Reino Unido - Escocia
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Estados Unidos de América
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct. September 24, 1997) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

En otros Estados contratantes, el enfoque adoptado con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución ha sido diferente:

Australia
En Australia, en un principio, la jurisprudencia relativa al Convenio adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución. Véase:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

En la sentencia State Central Authority v. Ardito, de 20 de octubre de 1997 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], el Tribunal de Familia de Melbourne estimó que la excepción de grave riesgo se encontraba configurada por la negativa de la madre a la restitución, pero, en este caso, a la madre se le había negado la entrada a los Estados Unidos de América, Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

Luego de la sentencia dictada por el High Court de Australia (la máxima autoridad judicial en el país), en el marco de las apelaciones conjuntas D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], se prestó más atención a la situación que debe enfrentar el menor luego de la restitución.

En el marco de los casos en que el progenitor sustractor era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor, que luego se niega a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Francia
En Francia, un enfoque permisivo del artículo 13(1)(b) ha sido reemplazado por una interpretación mucho más restrictiva. Véanse:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12.7.1994, S. c. S., Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, No de pourvoi 98-17902 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

Los casos siguientes constituyen ejemplos de la interpretación más estricta:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de pourvoi 02-17411 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de pourvoi 11/01437 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
En la jurisprudencia israelí se han adoptado respuestas divergentes a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución:

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro. v. Ro [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]

A diferencia de:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y. v. D.R. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Polonia
Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 7 de octubre de 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Corte Suprema señaló que privar a la niña del cuidado de su madre, si esta última decidía permanecer en Polonia, era contrario al interés superior de la menor. No obstante, también afirmó que si permanecía en Polonia, estar privada del cuidado de su padre también era contrario a sus intereses. Por estas razones, el Tribunal llegó a la conclusión de que no se podía declarar que la restitución fuera a colocarla en una situación intolerable.

Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 1 de diciembre de 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Corte Suprema precisó que el típico argumento sobre la posible separación del niño del padre privado del menor no es suficiente, en principio, para que se configure la excepción. Declaró que en los casos en los que no existen obstáculos objetivos para que el padre sustractor regrese, se puede presumir que el padre sustractor adjudica una mayor importancia a su propio interés que al interés del niño.

La Corte añadió que el miedo del padre sustractor a incurrir en responsabilidad penal no constituye un obstáculo objetivo a la restitución, ya que se considera que debería haber sido consciente de sus acciones. Sin embargo, la situación se complica cuando los niños son muy pequeños. La Corte declaró que el lazo especial que existe entre la madre y su bebe hace que la separación sea posible solo en casos excepcionales, aun cuando no existan circunstancias objetivas que obstaculicen el regreso de la madre al Estado de residencia habitual. La Corte declaró que en los casos en que la madre de un niño pequeño se niega a la restitución, por la razón que fuere, se deberá desestimar la demanda de retorno sobre la base del artículo 13(1)(b). En base a los hechos del caso, se resolvió en favor de la restitución.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)
Existen sentencias del TEDH en las que se adoptó un enfoque estricto con respecto a la compatibilidad de las excepciones del Convenio de La Haya con el Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH). En algunos de estos casos se plantearon argumentos respecto de la cuestión del grave riesgo, incluso en asuntos en los que el padre sustractor ha expresado una negativa a acompañar al niño en el retorno. Véase:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

En este caso, el TEDH acogió la apelación del padre solicitante en donde este planteaba que la negativa de los tribunales turcos a resolver la restitución del menor implicaba una vulneración del artículo 8 del CEDH. El TEDH afirmó que si bien se debe tener en cuenta la corta edad del menor para determinar qué es lo más conveniente para él en un asunto de sustracción, no se puede considerar este criterio por sí solo como justificación suficiente, en el sentido del Convenio de La Haya, para desestimar la demanda de restitución.

Se ha recurrido a pruebas periciales para determinar las consecuencias que pueden resultar de la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05), 6 de diciembre de 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10), 18 de enero de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12), 15 de mayo de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Sin embargo, también cabe señalar que desde la sentencia de la Gran Sala del caso Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland ha habido ejemplos en los que se ha adoptado un enfoque menos estricto. En esta sentencia se había puesto énfasis en el interés superior del niño en el marco de una demanda de restitución, y en determinar si los tribunales nacionales habían llevado a cabo un examen pormenorizado de la situación familiar y una evaluación equilibrada y razonable de los intereses de cada una de las partes. Véanse:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Gran Sala, 6 de julio de 2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), 13 de diciembre de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; y sentencia de la Gran Sala X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), Gran Sala [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11), 10 de julio de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

En este caso, la mayoría sostuvo que el retorno del menor a los Estados Unidos de América constituiría una violación al artículo 8 del CEDH. Se declaró que el proceso decisorio del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Bélgica con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) no había observado los requisitos procesales inherentes al artículo 8 del CEDH. Los dos jueces que votaron en disidencia resaltaron, no obstante, que el riesgo al que hace referencia el artículo 13 no debe estar relacionado únicamente con la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Naturaleza y tenor de la oposición

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

La máxima instancia de Australia (la High Court) adoptó una interpretación literal del término "objeción". Sin embargo, una reforma legislativa cambió la interpretacion posteriormente. Véase:

Art. 111B(1B) de la Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975) incorporada por la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000).

El artículo 13(2), incorporado al derecho australiano mediante la reg. 16(3) de las Regulaciones de Derecho de Familia (Sustracción de Menores) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), establece en la actualidad no solo que el menor debe oponerse a la restitución, sino que la objeción debe demostrar un sentimiento fuerte más allá de la mera expresión de una preferencia o simples deseos.

Véanse, por ejemplo:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 904].

La cuestión acerca de si un menor debe plantear una objeción expresamente al Estado de residencia habitual no ha sido resuelta. Véase:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 8/10/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 549].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 546].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Canadá
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 1028].

Para probar que un menor se opone a la restitución, ha de demostrarse que el menor "expresó un fuerte desacuerdo a regresar al pais de su residencia habitual. Su oposición ha de ser categórica. No puede determinarse simplemente pesando las ventajas y desventajas de los dos Estados en cuestión, como en el caso del análisis de su interés superior. Debe tratarse de algo más fuerte que de una mera expresión de preferencia".


Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En el caso Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 87], el Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la restitución a la que un menor se opone debe ser una restitución inmediata al país del que fue ilícitamente sustraído. El artículo 13 no contiene disposición alguna que permita considerar si el menor se opone a la restitución en ciertas circunstancias.

En Re M. (A Minor)(Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 56], se aceptó, sin embargo, que una objeción a la vida con el progenitor solicitante puede distinguirse de una objeción a la vida en el país de origen previo.

En Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], Lord Justice Ward planteó una serie de preguntas a fin de ayudar a determinar si es adecuado tener en cuenta las objeciones de un menor.

Estas preguntas fueron respaldadas por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el marco del caso Re M. (A Child)(Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901].

Para comentarios académicos ver: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

Francia
Las objeciones basadas exclusivamente en una preferencia por la vida en Francia o la vida con el padre sustractor no fueron admitidas, ver:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. c. F. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 63].

Reino Unido - Escocia
En el caso Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs79], se adoptó una interpretación amplia. La Inner House of the Court of Session (tribunal de apelaciones) aceptó que una fuerte preferencia por permanecer con el padre sustractor y por la vida en Escocia implicaba una objeción a la restitución a los Estados Unidos de América.

En W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 805], la Inner House of the Court of Session, que aceptó el criterio inicial de Re T. [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], sostuvo que las objeciones relativas a cuestiones de bienestar debían ser tratadas exclusivamente por las autoridades del Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

En el posterior caso de primera instancia: M, Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith destacó la división en la jurisprudencia de apelación y decidió seguir la línea de autoridad previa ejemplificada en Urness v. Minto. Rechazó expresamente los criterios iniciales de Re T.

La jueza dejó asentado en su sentencia que habría habido un intento de impugnar la sentencia de la Inner House of the Court of Session en W. v. W. ante la Cámara de los Lores pero que el caso se había resuelto en forma amigable.

Más recientemente, se ha seguido un enfoque más estricto en cuanto a las objeciones, ver: C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]; ratificado en instancia de apelación: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996].

Suiza
El máximo tribunal suizo ha resaltado la importancia de que los menores sean capaces de distinguir entre las cuestiones vinculadas a la custodia y las cuestiones vinculadas a la restitución. Véanse:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 894].

La mera preferencia por la vida en el Estado de refugio, incluso motivada, no satisfará los términos del artículo 13(2):

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986].

Para comentarios académicos generales, véase: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia, 2008).