CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

S. Hanbury-Brown and R. Hanbury-Brown v. Director General of Community Services (Central Authority) (1996) FLC 92-671

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 69

Court

Country

AUSTRALIA

Name

Full Court of the Family Court of Australia at Sydney

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Ellis, Lindenmayer and Finn JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

14 March 1996

Status

Final

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3 | Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12 | Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Procedural Matters

Order

Appeal dismissed, return refused

HC article(s) Considered

3 Preamble

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Re J. (A Minor)(Abduction: Custody Rights), sub. nom C. v. S. (A Minor)(Abduction) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450; Friedrich v. Friedrich 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993); Artso v. Artso (1995) FLC 92-575; McCall and McCall; State Central Authority (Applicant); Attorney-General (Intervenor) (1995) FLC 92-551; Kilgour v. Kilgour 1987 SLT 568.

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

General Approach to Interpretation
Interpretation
Removal & Retention
Nature of Removal and Retention
Commencement of Removal / Retention
Habitual Residence
Can a Child have more than one Habitual Residence?

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
Autonomous Interpretation of 'Rights of Custody' And 'Wrongfulness'

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The children, a boy and a girl, were 7 1/2 and 5 at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. The parents were separated; both enjoyed rights of custody. On 27 April 1995 the father took the children to Australia.

The parents and latterly the children had lived in London from 1982 until 1991. In August 1991 the family moved to New York because of the wife's job. On 28 July 1994 the father and children relocated to Australia. The parents then agreed that the father would bring the children back to the United States to allow the mother to have access.

They left on 30 March 1995, intending to return on 21 December. Shortly after their arrival the father discovered that the wife did not intend to abide by the agreement and three weeks after their arrival the father took the children back to Australia with him.

On 1 May 1995 the father commenced custody proceedings in the Family Court of Australia at Sydney.

On 5 May 1995 the mother obtained an ex parte order for temporary custody from the Superior Court for the State of Connecticut, Judicial District of Stamford / Norwalk.

On 17 May the return application proceedings filed by the United States' Central Authority on behalf of the mother were commenced in the Family Court of Australia.

On 9 June 1995 the Family Court of Australia dismissed the return application.

The Director General of Community Services appealed.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and return refused; the children were habitually resident in Australia at the relevant date.

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3

The Convention does not contemplate the possibility of dual habitual residences. Articles 3 and 15, as well as the Preamble, all refer to 'the State of a child's habitual residence' not 'a State.' Article 13 refers to 'the central or other competent authority of the child's habitual residence' and not 'of a habitual residence of the child.' The court found that the children were habitually resident in Australia at the date of the removal, consequently the return application failed.

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12

The words removal and retention must be construed in the context of the entire Convention, including the Preamble. In this context the critical phrase of the Preamble is the desire of Contracting States to protect children internationally from the harmful effects of their wrongful removal or retention and to establish procedures for their prompt return to the State of their habitual residence. Removal and retention are co-relative terms, each being the converse of the other and each importing a notion of physical movement of a material object, in the former case 'from' and in the latter case 'to' a place in the material world. To be wrongful a removal under the Convention does not have to be from the country of the child's habitual residence. 'Removal to' is meant to refer to a physical movement of children into a Contracting State from a place outside it.

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

Breach of Custody Rights Wrongfulness is to be determined in accordance with the law of the child's State of habitual residence.

Procedural Matters

Referring to the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, 1980, the court held that the terms removal and retention were clear and settled, leaving no ambiguity or obscurity. Therefore there was no need to resort to the travaux preparatoires as an aid to interpretation.

INCADAT comment

Interpretation

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Nature of Removal and Retention

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Commencement of Removal / Retention

Primarily this will be a factual question for the court seised of the return petition. The issue may be of relevance where there is doubt as to whether the 12 month time limit referred to in Article 12(1) has elapsed, or indeed if there is uncertainty as to whether the alleged wrongful act has occurred before or after the entry into force of the Convention between the child's State of habitual residence and the State of refuge.

International Dimension

A legal issue which has arisen and been settled with little controversy in several States, is that as the Convention is only concerned with international protection for children from removal or retention and not with removal or retention within the State of their habitual residence, the removal or retention in question must of necessity be from the jurisdiction of the courts of the State of the child's habitual residence and not simply from the care of holder of custody rights.

Australia
Murray v. Director, Family Services (1993) FLC 92-416, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 113]. 

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];  Kay J. confirmed that time did not run, for the purposes of Art. 12, from the moment the child arrived in the State of refuge.

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];  Kay J. held that the precise determination of time had to be calculated in accordance with local time at the place where the wrongful removal had occurred.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H.; Re S. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476, [1991] 3 All ER 230, [1991] 2 FLR 262, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 115].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Findlay v. Findlay 1994 SLT 709, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 184].

However in a very early Convention case Kilgour v. Kilgour 1987 SC 55, 1987 SLT 568, 1987 SCLR 344, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 116], the parties were at one in proceeding on the basis that the relevant removal for the purposes of the Convention was a removal in breach of custody rights rather than a removal from the country where the child previously lived. 

Agreement on the issue of the commencement of return was not reached in the Israeli case Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite:  HC/E/IL 938].  One judge accepted that the relevant date was the date of removal from the State of habitual residence, whilst the other who reached a view held that it was the date of arrival in Israel. 

Communication of Intention Not to Return a Child

Different positions have been adopted as to whether a retention will commence from the moment a person decides not to return a child, or whether the retention only commences from when the other custody holder learns of the intention not to return or that intention is specifically communicated.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (Minors) (Abduction: Wrongful Retention) [1994] Fam 70, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 117], the English High Court was prepared to accept that an uncommunicated decision by the abductor was of itself capable of constituting an act of wrongful retention.

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 50]: the moment the mother unilaterally decided not to return the child was not the point in time at which the retention became wrongful. This was no more than an uncommunicated intention to retain the child in the future from which the mother could still have resiled.  The retention could have originated from the date of the aunt's ex parte application for residence and prohibited steps orders.

United States of America
Slagenweit v. Slagenweit, 841 F. Supp. 264 (N.D. Iowa 1993), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 143].

The wrongful retention did not begin to run until the mother clearly communicated her desire to regain custody and asserted her parental right to have the child live with her.

Zuker v. Andrews, 2 F. Supp. 2d 134 (D. Mass. 1998) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKf 122], the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts held that a retention occurs when, on an objective assessment, a dispossessed custodian learns that the child is not to be returned.

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 879].

The Court of Appeals held that ultimately it was not required to decide whether a child was not retained under the Convention until a parent unequivocally communicated his or her desire to regain custody, but it assumed that this standard applied.

Can a Child have more than one Habitual Residence?

Academic commentators have long held that if the factual nature of the connecting factor is to be respected then situations may arise where an individual is habitually resident in more than one place at a particular time, see in particular:

Clive E. M. ‘The Concept of Habitual Residence' Juridical Review (1997), p. 137.

However, the Court of Appeal in England has accepted in the context of divorce jurisdiction that it is possible for an adult to be habitually resident in two places simultaneously, see:

Ikimi v. Ikimi [2001] EWCA Civ 873, [2002] Fam 72.

Courts in Convention proceedings have though held to the view that a child can only have one habitual residence, see for example:

Canada
SS-C c GC, Cour supérieure (Montréal), 15 août 2003, n° 500-04-033270-035, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 916];

Wilson v. Huntley (2005) A.C.W.S.J. 7084; 138 A.C.W.S. (3d) 1107 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 800];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [1995] 2 FLR 992, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 45].

In this case where the children's lives alternated between Greece and England the court held that their habitual residence also alternated.  The court ruled out their having concurrent habitual residences in both Greece and England.

United Kingdom - Northern Ireland
Re C.L. (A Minor); J.S. v. C.L., transcript, 25 August 1998, High Court of Northern Ireland, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKn 390];

United States of America
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, (6th Cir. 1993), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 142].

Autonomous Interpretation of 'Rights of Custody' And 'Wrongfulness'

Conflicts have on occasion emerged between courts in different Contracting States as to the outcomes in individual cases.  This has primarily been with regard to the interpretation of custody rights or the separate, but related issue of the ‘wrongfulness' of a removal or retention.

Conflict Based on Scope of ‘Rights of Custody'

Whilst the overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted a uniform interpretation of rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention, some differences do exist.A

For example: in New Zealand a very broad view prevails - Gross v. Boda [1995] 1 NZLR 569 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 66].  But in parts of the United States of America a narrow view is favoured - Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313].

Consequently where a return petition involves either of these States a conflict may arise with the other Contracting State as to whether a right of custody does or does not exist and therefore whether the removal or retention is wrongful.

New Zealand / United Kingdom - England & Wales
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

A positive determination of wrongfulness by the courts in the child's State of habitual residence in New Zealand was rejected by the English Court of Appeal which found the applicant father to have no rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

United Kingdom  - Scotland / United States of America (Virginia)
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494].

For the purposes of Scots law the removal of the child was in breach of actually exercised rights of custody.  This view was however rejected by the US Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit.

United States of America / United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 591].

Making a return order the English Court of Appeal held that the rights given to the father by the New York custody order were rights of custody for Convention purposes, whether or not New York state or federal law so regarded them whether for domestic purposes or Convention purposes.

Conflict Based on Interpretation of ‘Wrongfulness'

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The Court of Appeal has traditionally held the view that the issue of wrongfulness is a matter for law of the forum, regardless of the law of the child's State of habitual residence.

Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 8].

Whilst the respondent parent had the right under Colorado law to remove their child out of the jurisdiction unilaterally the removal was nevertheless regarded as being wrongful by the English Court of Appeal.

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 591];

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

In the most extreme example this reasoning was applied notwithstanding an Article 15 declaration to the contrary, see:

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 866].

However, this finding was overturned by the House of Lords which unanimously held that where an Article 15 declaration is sought the ruling of the foreign court as to the content of the rights held by the applicant must be treated as conclusive, save in exceptional cases where, for example, the ruling has been obtained by fraud or in breach of the rules of natural justice:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

Elsewhere there has been an express or implied preference for the general application of the law of the child's State of habitual residence to the issue of wrongfulness, see:

Australia
S. Hanbury-Brown and R. Hanbury-Brown v. Director General of Community Services (Central Authority) (1996) FLC 92-671, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 69];

Austria
3Ob89/05t, Oberster Gerichtshof, 11/05/2005 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 855];

6Ob183/97y, Oberster Gerichtshof, 19/06/1997 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 557];

Canada
Droit de la famille 2675, Cour supérieure de Québec, 22 April 1997, No 200-04-003138-979[INCADAT cite : HC/E/CA 666];

Germany
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 822];

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 944];

United States of America
Carrascosa v. McGuire, 520 F.3d 249 (3rd Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 970].

The United States Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit refused to recognize a Spanish non-return order, finding that the Spanish courts had applied their own law rather than the law of New Jersey in assessing whether the applicant father held rights of custody.

The European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
The ECrtHR has been prepared to intervene where interpretation of rights of custody has been misapplied:

Monory v. Hungary & Romania, (2005) 41 E.H.R.R. 37, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 802].

In Monory the ECrtHR found that there had been a breach of the right to family life in Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) where the Romanian courts had so misinterpreted Article 3 of the Hague Convention that the guarantees of the latter instrument itself were violated.

Faits

Les enfants, un garçon et une fille, étaient âgés de 7 ans ½ et 5 ans à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Les parents s'étaient séparés, chacun d'entre eux ayant un droit de garde. Le 27 avril 1995, le père emmena les enfants en Australie.

Les parents, et plus tard les enfants, avaient vécu à Londres entre 1982 et 1991. En août 1991, la famille s'installa à New York pour des raisons professionnelles tenant à la mère. Le 28 juillet 1994, le père et les enfants déménagèrent en Australie. Les parents convinrent que le père ramènerait les enfants aux Etats-Unis pour permettre à la mère d'exercer un droit de visite.

Ils s'y rendirent le 30 mars 1995, avec l'intention de rentrer le 21 décembre suivant. Peu après leur arrivée, le père découvrit que la mère n'avait pas l'intention de respecter leur accord, et trois semaines après leur arrivée, il rentra en Australie avec les enfants.

Le premier mai, le père saisit le juge aux affaires familiales de Sydney d'une demande tendant à obtenir la garde des enfants.

Le 5 mai 1995, la mère obtint de la Superior Court pour l'État du Connecticut (District de Stamford / Norwalk) une décision non-contradictoire lui accordant provisoirement la garde.

Le 17 mai, le juge aux affaires familiales australien fut saisi de la demande de retour introduite par l'Autorité Centrale américaine à la demande de la mère.

Le 9 juin 1995, la Family Court d'Australie rejeta la demande de retour.

Le directeur général des services communautaires interjeta appel.

Dispositif

Appel rejeté et retour refusé ; les enfants avaient leur résidence habituelle en Australie à la date du déplacement.

Motifs

Résidence habituelle - art. 3

La Convention ne prévoit pas la possibilité d’une pluralité de résidences habituelles. Les articles 3 et 15, comme le préambule, se réfèrent tous à « l’Etat de la résidence habituelle de l’enfant », non à « un Etat ». L’article 13 vise « l’Autorité centrale ou toute autre autorité compétente de l’Etat de la résidence habituelle de l’enfant », non « d’une résidence habituelle ». La Cour estima que les enfants avaient leur résidence habituelle en Australie à la date du déplacement, de sorte que la demande de retour ne pouvait être admise.

Déplacement et non-retour - art. 3 et 12

Les termes déplacement et non-retour doivent être compris dans le contexte général de la Convention, incluant le préambule. Dans ce contexte, l’expression fondamentale du préambule manifeste la volonté des Etats contractants de protéger l’enfant, sur le plan international, contre les effets nuisibles d’un déplacement ou d’un non-retour illicites et d’établir des procédures en vue de garantir le retour immédiat de l’enfant dans l’Etat de sa résidence habituelle. Déplacement et non-retour sont des termes apparentés, l’un étant le contraire de l’autre et l’un et l’autre impliquant la notion de mouvement physique d’un objet matériel dans le premier cas « de » et dans le second cas « dans » un endroit du monde physique. Pour être illicite selon la Convention, un déplacement n’a pas à avoir lieu « de » l’Etat de résidence habituelle de l’enfant. « Déplacement dans » se réfère à un mouvement physique des enfants de l’étranger dans un Etat contractant.

Droit de garde - art. 3

Violation du droit de garde L’illicéité doit être déterminée conformément à la loi de l’Etat de la résidence habituelle de l’enfant.

Questions procédurales

Par référence à la Convention de Vienne sur le Droit des Traités, la Cour considéra que les termes déplacement et non-retour étaient clairs et bien établis, sans qu’il y ait ambiguïté ou obscurité. Par conséquent, il n’était pas nécessaire de recourir aux travaux préparatoires pour en dégager le sens.

Commentaire INCADAT

Interprétation

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Nature du déplacement et du non-retour

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Moment du déplacement ou du non-retour

La question du moment à partir duquel il y a déplacement ou non-retour illicite est une question essentiellement factuelle qui devra être résolue par la juridiction saisie de la demande de retour. Cette question est importante dans le cadre de l'application de l'article 12 (1), lorsqu'on n'est pas certain que les 12 mois se sont écoulés depuis l'enlèvement ou lorsqu'il est nécessaire de déterminer si au moment de l'enlèvement la Convention de La Haye était bien applicable entre l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant et l'État de refuge.

Portée internationale

Plusieurs tribunaux de plusieurs États contractants ont considéré la question de savoir si le déplacement ou le non-retour commencent au moment où l'enfant est soustrait à la personne en ayant la garde ou seulement au moment où l'enfant quitte l'État de sa résidence habituelle ou est empêché d'y retourner ; cette question a été tranchée de manière uniforme. Les tribunaux ont considéré que la Convention de La Haye ayant pour objet l'enlèvement international et non l'enlèvement interne, le déplacement ou le non-retour n'étaient illicites qu'à partir du moment où le problème n'était pas ou plus purement interne.

Australie
Murray v. Director, Family Services (1993) FLC 92-416, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 113]

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ; Kay J. a confirmé qu'aux fins de l'article 12 le délai ne commence à courir qu'à partir du moment où l'enfant arrive dans l'État de refuge.

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ; Kay J. a affirmé que pour déterminer le délai avec précision il fallait le calculer en prenant en compte l'heure locale du lieu d'où l'enfant s'était vu déplacer illicitement.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H.; Re S. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476, [1991] 3 All ER 230, [1991] 2 FLR 262, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 115]. 

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Findlay v. Findlay 1994 SLT 709, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 184],

Toutefois, dans une affaire ancienne, Kilgour v. Kilgour 1987 SC 55, 1987 SLT 568, 1987 SCLR 344, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 116], les parties s'accordaient à dire que le déplacement à prendre en compte commençait au moment où l'enfant avait été soustrait à la garde d'un des parents en disposant et non pas seulement au moment où il avait quitté le territoire de l'État de sa résidence habituelle.

Dans l'affaire israélienne Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 938], le Tribunal ne trouva pas d'accord sur cette question. Un juge estima que la date du déplacement était celle à laquelle l'enfant avait quitté l'État de sa résidence habituelle, l'autre considérant que la date du déplacement était celle de l'arrivée de l'enfant en Israël.

Information concernant l'intention de ne pas rendre l'enfant

Différentes positions ont été adoptées concernant la question de savoir si le non-retour commence à partir du moment où l'une des deux personnes disposant de la garde d'un enfant décide de ne pas le rendre à l'autre personne partageant la garde ou uniquement lorsque cette deuxième  personne apprend l'intention de la première de ne pas lui rendre l'enfant ou que cette intention lui est expressément communiquée.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans l'affaire Re S. (Minors) (Abduction: Wrongful Retention) [1994] Fam 70, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 117], la High Court anglaise était disposée à accepter le fait qu'une décision non communiquée par le parent ravisseur pouvait constituer en soi un non-retour illicite.

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 50] : le non-retour illicite de l'enfant n'a pas pour point de départ le moment où la mère a décidé unilatéralement de ne pas rendre l'enfant. Ce fait n'était qu'une intention non communiquée de ne pas rendre l'enfant à l'avenir ; intention sur laquelle elle aurait encore pu revenir. Le non retour aurait pu commencer à partir de la date à laquelle la tante a déposé une demande ex parte de résidence et une Ordonnance sur les mesures interdites (prohibited steps orders).

États-Unis d'Amérique
Slagenweit v. Slagenweit, 841 F. Supp. 264 (N.D. Iowa 1993), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 143].
 
Le non-retour illicite a uniquement commencé à partir du moment où la mère a communiqué clairement son désir d'obtenir à nouveau la garde de l'enfant et a revendiqué son droit parental à vivre avec son enfant.

Zuker v. Andrews, 2 F. Supp. 2d 134 (D. Mass. 1998) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKf 122], la District Court for the District of Massachusetts des États-Unis d'Amérique a considéré qu'un non-retour se produit lorsque le parent gardien dépossédé constate objectivement le non-retour de l'enfant.

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

La Cour d'appel a considéré qu'en dernière analyse il n'était pas nécessaire de se prononcer sur la question de savoir si le non-retour de l'enfant relevait ou non de la Convention jusqu'à ce que l'un des parents exprime clairement son désir de récupérer le droit de garde, mais elle a assumé que cette norme s'appliquait.

Un enfant peut-il avoir plusieurs résidences habituelles?

Les commentateurs ont longtemps estimé que la nature factuelle du facteur de rattachement implique que dans certaines situations une personne puisse avoir plusieurs résidences habituelles à un moment donné.

Voir en particulier :

E. M. Clive, « The Concept of Habitual Residence », Juridical Review (1997), p. 137.

La cour d'appel anglaise a estimé dans le contexte de la compétence internationale en matière de divorce qu'un adulte pouvait avoir plusieurs résidences habituelles en même temps. Voir :

Ikimi v. Ikimi [2001] EWCA Civ 873, [2002] Fam 72.

Toutefois les tribunaux saisis de demandes en application de la Convention ont estimé qu'un enfant ne peut avoir qu'une seule résidence habituelle à un moment donné. Voir par exemple :

Canada

S.S.-C. c. G.C., Cour supérieure (Montréal), 15 août 2003, n° 500-04-033270-035, [INCADAT cite : HC/E/CA 916] ;

Wilson v. Huntley (2005) A.C.W.S.J. 7084; 138 A.C.W.S. (3d) 1107 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 800] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re v. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [1995] 2 FLR 992, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 45].

En l'espèce, les enfants passaient une partie de l'année en Grèce et l'autre en Angleterre. La cour refusa de considérer qu'ils avaient à la fois leur résidence habituelle en Grèce et en Angleterre.

Royaume-Uni - Ireland du Nord

Re C.L. (A Minor); J.S. v. C.L., transcript, 25 August 1998, High Court of Northern Ireland, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKn 390].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, (6th Cir. 1993), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142].

Interprétation autonome du « droit de garde » et de « l'illicéité »

Des conflits se sont parfois fait jour entre des juridictions de plusieurs États contractants traitant des mêmes affaires. Ces conflits se sont particulièrement manifestés dans le cadre de l'interprétation de la notion de droit de garde et de celle de l'illicéité du déplacement ou du non-retour.

Conflits relatifs à la notion de « droit de garde »

Bien que la plupart des États contractants aient adopté une interprétation uniforme de la notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention, des différences subsistent.

Ainsi en Nouvelle-Zélande, une interprétation très libérale est privilégiée - Gross v. Boda [1995] 1 NZLR 569 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 66]. Au contraire, aux États-Unis d'Amérique, c'est une interprétation très restrictive qui prévaut - Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313].

De la sorte, lorsqu'une demande de retour concerne des États aux positions différentes, un conflit peut naître quant à la question de savoir si tel parent avait un droit de garde et si le déplacement ou le non-retour était illicite.

Nouvelle-Zélande / Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809]

La Cour d'appel anglaise rejeta une attestation d'illicéité délivrée par l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant, la Nouvelle-Zélande. Selon la Cour d'appel, le père n'avait pas de droit de garde selon la Convention.

Royaume-Uni - Écosse / États-Unis d'Amérique (Virginie)
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494]

Du point de vue du droit écossais, le déplacement de l'enfant était intervenu en violation d'un droit de garde effectivement exercé. Cette position fut rejetée par la Cour d'appel fédérale du quatrième ressort aux États-Unis.

États-Unis d'Amérique/ Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 591]

Pour ordonner le retour de l'enfant, la Cour d'appel anglaise décida que le droit que conférait au père une décision new-yorkaise était un droit de garde au sens de la Convention, le fait que ce droit soit ou non caractérisé de droit de garde au sens de la Convention ou au sens du droit new-yorkais commun fédéral ou étatique important peu.

Conflit concernant « l'illicéité »

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
La Cour d'appel a traditionnellement considéré que la question de l'illicéité relevait de la loi du for, le droit de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant étant sans pertinence.

Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 8]

Alors que le défendeur avait le droit selon la loi en vigueur au Colorado de déplacer unilatéralement l'enfant hors du territoire, la Cour d'appel anglaise considéra le déplacement comme illicite.

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 591]

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809]

L'affaire Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 866] offre l'exemple le plus extrême de cette jurisprudence, le raisonnement étant appliqué nonobstant une déclaration de l'article 15 contraire.

Toutefois cette décision fut annulée par la Chambre des Lords qui, dans une décision unanime, considéra que si une déclaration de l'article 15 est demandée, alors la cour est liée par le contenu de cette déclaration étrangère, sauf dans des cas exceptionnels où, par exemple, la déclaration a été frauduleusement obtenue ou a été rendue en violation d'un principe de justice naturelle :

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Dans d'autres pays, les juridictions ont préféré faire application expresse ou tacite de la loi de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant afin de déterminer l'illicéité du déplacement. Voir :

Australie
S. Hanbury-Brown and R. Hanbury-Brown v. Director General of Community Services (Central Authority) (1996) FLC 92-671, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 69] ;

Autriche
3Ob89/05t, Oberster Gerichtshof, 11/05/2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 855] ;

6Ob183/97y, Oberster Gerichtshof, 19/06/1997 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 557] ;

Canada
Droit de la famille 2675, Cour supérieure de Québec, 22 avril 1997, No 200-04-003138-979 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 666] ;

Allemagne
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 822] ;

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 944] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Carrascosa v. McGuire, 520 F.3d 249 (3rd Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 970].

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel du 3e ressort a refusé de reconnaître une décision espagnole de non-retour, estimant que les tribunaux espagnols auraient dû appliquer non pas leur droit mais le droit du New Jersey pour déterminer si le père avait un droit de garde.

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
La CourEDH est intervenue dans une affaire où le droit de garde avait été mal interprété.

Monory v. Hungary & Romania, (2005) 41 E.H.R.R. 37, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 802].

Dans cette espèce, la CourEDH estima que les tribunaux roumains avaient violé l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH) en méconnaissant le sens de l'article 3 de la Convention de La Haye d'une manière si grossière que les garanties de cet instruments étaient elles-mêmes méconnues.

Hechos

Los menores, un varón y una niña, tenían 7 años y medio y 5 años respectivamente a la fecha de la supuesta sustracción ilícita. Los padres estaban separados y ambos tenían derechos de custodia. El 27 de abril de 1995 la madre llevó a los menores a Australia.

Los padres y en los últimos tiempos los menores habían vivido en Londres desde 1982 hasta 1991. En agosto de 1991 la familia se trasladó a Nueva York debido al trabajo de la esposa. El 28 de julio de 1994 el padre y los menores se reubicaron en Australia. Los padres después acordaron que el padre traería a los menores de vuelta a los Estados Unidos para permitir a la madre tener acceso.

Partieron el 30 de marzo de 1995; con la idea de regresar el 21 de diciembre. Shortly after their arrival the father discovered that the wife did not intend to abide by the agreement and three weeks after their arrival the father took the children back to Australia with him.

El 1º de mayo de 1995 comenzó el juicio de custodia en el Tribunal de familia de Australia en Sydney.

El 5 de mayo de 1995 la madre obtuvo una orden sin conocimiento de la otra parte para la custodia temporaria desde el Tribunal Superior para el Estado de Connecticut, Distrito Judicial de Stamford / Norwalk.

El 17 de mayo se iniciaron las actuaciones para la solicitud de restitución presentada por la Autoridad Central de los Estados Unidos en nombre de la madre en el Tribunal de Familia de Australia.

El 9 de junio de 1995 el Tribunal de Familia de Australia desestimó la solicitud de restitución.

El Director General of Community Services presentó recurso de apelación.

Fallo

Se desestimó la apelación y se denegó la restitución, los menores eran habitualmente residentes de Australia en la fecha pertinente.

Fundamentos

Residencia habitual - art. 3

El convenio no prevé la posibilidad de residencias habituales dobles. Los artículos 3 y 15, así como el Preámbulo, se refieren todos al “Estado de residencia habitual del menor” no a “un Estado”. El artículo 13 se refiere a “la autoridad central u otra autoridad competente de país de residencia habitual del menor” y no “de un país de residencia habitual del menor”. El tribunal demostró que los menores eran habitualmente residentes de Australia en la fecha de la sustracción; por consiguiente fracasó la solicitud de restitución.

Traslado y retención - arts. 3 y 12

Las palabras sustracción y retención deben interpretarse en el contexto del Convenio en su totalidad, incluyendo el Preámbulo. En este contexto la frase crítica del Preámbulo es el deseo de los Estados Contratantes de proteger los menores internacionalmente de los efectos perjudiciales de su sustracción o retención ilícitas y establecer procedimientos para su pronta restitución al estado de su residencia habitual. La sustracción y la retención son términos correlativos, siendo cada uno de ellos el opuesto del otro e implicando cada uno de ellos una noción de movimiento físico de un objeto material, en el caso anterior “desde” y en el último caso “hacia” un lugar en el mundo material. Para que un traslado pueda ser considerado sustracción ilícita conforme al Convenio no tiene que ser desde el país de residencia habitual del menor. El “traslado hacia” se refiere a un movimiento de menores hacia un Estado Contratante desde un lugar fuera de éste.

Derechos de custodia - art. 3

Violación de los derechos de custodia La ilicitud se determina de acuerdo con la ley del estado de residencia habitual del menor.

Cuestiones procesales

Con referencia a la Convención de Viena sobre la Ley de los Tratados de 1980, el tribunal sostuvo que los términos sustracción y retención eran claros y estaban establecidos, sin dejar lugar para la ambigüedad o la oscuridad. Por lo tanto, no hay necesidad de recurrir a los travaux préparatoires (trabajos previos) como ayuda para la interpretación.

Comentario INCADAT

Interpretación

En curso de elaboración.

Carácter del traslado y retención

En curso de elaboración.

Momento del traslado y retención

Inicialmente, esta cuestión de hecho incumbe al tribunal que haya tomado conocimiento de la solicitud de restitución. El problema puede tener relevancia cuando existen dudas sobre si el plazo de 12 meses al que se hace referencia en al artículo 12(1) ha vencido, o si hay incertidumbre respecto de si el acto presuntamente ilícito ha ocurrido antes o después de la entrada en vigor del Convenio entre el Estado de residencia habitual del menor y el Estado de refugio.

Ámbito internacional

Una cuestión jurídica que se ha suscitado y se ha resuelto con poca controversia en varios Estados está ligada al hecho de que el Convenio solo se ocupa de la protección internacional de menores trasladados o retenidos ilícitamente, y no del traslado o la retención de menores dentro del Estado de su residencia habitual. El traslado o la retención en cuestión debe necesariamente ser de la jurisdicción de los tribunales del Estado de residencia habitual del menor y no simplemente del cuidado de quien detenta la titularidad de los derechos de custodia.

Australia

Murray v. Director, Family Services (1993) FLC 92-416, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 113];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232]; 

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales

Re H.; Re S. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476, [1991] 3 All ER 230, [1991] 2 FLR 262, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 115];

Reino Unido – Escocia

Findlay v. Findlay 1994 SLT 709, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 184].

Sin embargo, en una de las causas más tempranas, Kilgour v. Kilgour 1987 SC 55, 1987 SLT 568, 1987 SCLR 344, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 116], las partes estaban de acuerdo en proceder sobre la base de que el traslado pertinente a los fines del Convenio comenzó con el traslado en violación de los derechos de custodia más que con el traslado del país donde el menor había vivido previamente.

En la causa israelí, Family Application 000111/07 Ploni vs. Almonit [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/IL 938], no se llegó a ningún acuerdo sobre el inicio del traslado. Un juez aceptó que la fecha pertinente era la fecha del traslado del Estado de residencia habitual mientras que el otro adoptó la opinión de que era la fecha de llegada a Israel.

Comunicación de la intención de no regresar al niño

Existen distintas posturas sobre si la retención comienza en el momento en que una persona decide no regresar al niño, o si comienza cuando el otro titular de derechos de custodia se entera de la intención de no regresar o esa intención le es comunicada.

Reino Unido – Inglaterra y Gales

En el asunto Re S. (Minors) (Abduction: Wrongful Retention) [1994] Fam 70, [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 117], el High Court inglés estaba dispuesto a aceptar que una decisión del padre sustractor, que no había sido comunicada, podía constituir un acto de retención ilícita.

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 50]: el momento en que la madre decidió unilateralmente no regresar al niño no fue el momento en que la retención se convirtió en ilícita. No era más que una intención de retener al niño en el futuro, que no fue comunicada, la que podría haber revertido. La retención podría haber comenzado en la fecha en que la tía presentó, inaudita parte, una solicitud de residencia y una orden de protección.

Estados Unidos de América

Slagenweit v. Slagenweit, 841 F. Supp. 264 (N.D. Iowa 1993), [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 143].

La retención ilícita solo comenzó cuando la madre comunicó claramente su intención de obtener nuevamente la custodia e invocó su derecho parental de vivir con su hija.

Zuker v. Andrews, 2 F. Supp. 2d 134 (D. Mass. 1998) [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKf 122], el Tribunal Federal de Distrito de Massachusetts estimó que la retención comienza cuando el padre custodio privado del niño constata objetivamente que el niño no regresará.

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 879].

El Tribunal de Apelaciones estimó que, en última instancia, no es necesario pronunciarse sobre si el niño fue retenido o no según el Convenio hasta que un padre comunica de manera inequívoca su intención de recuperar su derecho de custodia. Sin embargo, asumió que esta norma era aplicable.

¿Puede un menor tener más de una residencia habitual?

Durante mucho tiempo, comentaristas académicos han sostenido que si la naturaleza fáctica del factor de conexión ha de respetarse, pueden surgir situaciones en las que una persona tenga residencia habitual en más de un lugar en un momento dado. Véase en particular:

Clive E. M., The Concept of Habitual Residence, Juridical Review (1997), 137.

Sin embargo, el Tribunal de Apelaciones de Inglaterra ha aceptado que, en el contexto de la competencia en materia de divorcio, es posible que un adulto tenga residencia habitual en dos lugares simultáneamente. Véase:

Ikimi v. Ikimi [2001] EWCA Civ 873, [2002] Fam 72.

No obstante, en el marco de procesos relativos al Convenio, los tribunales han adoptado la opinión de que un menor solo puede tener un lugar de residencia habitual. Véanse, por ejemplo:

Canadá
SS-C c GC, Cour supérieure (Montréal), 15 août 2003, n° 500-04-033270-035, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 916];

Wilson v. Huntley (2005) A.C.W.S.J. 7084; 138 A.C.W.S. (3d) 1107 [Referncia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 800].

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re V. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [1995] 2 FLR 992, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 45].

En este caso en el que los menores vivían entre Grecia e Inglaterra, el tribunal sostuvo que su residencia habitual también variaba. El tribunal descartó que tuvieran residencia habitual en Grecia y en Inglaterra en simultaneo.

Estados Unidos de América
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, (6th Cir. 1993) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 142].

Interpretación autónoma de "derechos de custodia" e "ilicitud"

En ocasiones, han surgido conflictos entre los tribunales de diferentes Estados contratantes acerca de los resultados en casos particulares. Esto se ha dado principalmente con respecto a la interpretación de los derechos de custodia o la cuestión separada pero relacionada de la "ilicitud" de un traslado o retención.

Conflictos relativos al alcance del concepto de "derechos de custodia"

Si bien la abrumadora mayoría de los Estados Contratantes han aceptado una interpretación uniforme de los derechos de custodia a los fines del Convenio, existen algunas diferencias.

Por ejemplo: en Nueva Zelanda prevalece una visión muy amplia - Gross v. Boda [1995] 1 NZLR 569 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 66]. Sin embargo, en partes de los Estados Unidos de América se favorece una visión restringida - Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 313].

Por consiguiente, cuando una solicitud de restitución involucra a alguno de estos Estados, puede surgir un conflicto con el otro Estado contratante acerca de si existe o no un derecho de custodia y, por lo tanto, si el traslado o la retención es ilícito.

Nueva Zelanda / Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Referenciaa INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 809].

Una determinación de ilicitud por parte de los tribunales del Estado de residencia habitual del menor en Nueva Zelanda fue rechazada por el Tribunal de Apelaciones inglés que resolvió que el padre solicitante carecía de derechos de custodia en el sentido del Convenio.

Reino Unido - Escocia / Estados Unidos de América (Virginia)
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), certificación denegada 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 494].

Según el Derecho escocés, el traslado del menor constituía una violación de los derechos de custodia en ejercicio. Sin embargo, esta opinión fue rechazada por el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos para el 4º Circuito.

Estados Unidos de América / Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 591].

En una orden de restitución, el tribunal inglés de apelaciones sostuvo que los derechos otorgados al padre en la orden de custodia del tribunal de Nueva York constituían derechos de custodia según el Convenio, ya sea que el Derecho del estado de Nueva York o el Derecho federal así los considerara a efectos locales o a efectos del Convenio.

Conflictos relativos a la Interpretación del concepto de "Ilicitud"

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales

Tradicionalmente, el Tribunal de Apelaciones ha considerado que la cuestión de ilicitud es una cuestión que corresponde al Derecho del foro, independientemente del Derecho del Estado de la residencia habitual del menor.

Re F. (A Minor)(Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 8].

Mientras que, en virtud de la legislación de Colorado, el padre demandado tenía derecho a trasladar a su hijo fuera de la jurisdicción en forma unilateral, el traslado, sin embargo, fue considerado ilícito por el tribunal de apelaciones inglés.

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 591];

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 809].

En el ejemplo más extremo, se aplicó este razonamiento no obstante una declaración del artículo 15 en contrario. Véase:

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 866].

Sin embargo, este fallo fue revocado por la Cámara de los Lores que sostuvo en forma unánime que toda vez que se solicita un declaración conforme al artículo 15, el fallo del tribunal extranjero respecto del contenido de los derechos de los que goza el solicitante debe tratarse como concluyente, excepto en casos excepcionales en los que, por ejemplo, el fallo se haya obtenido por fraude o en violación de las normas de la justicia natural:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880].

En otros lugares, ha habido una preferencia expresa o tácita por la aplicación general del Derecho del Estado de la residencia habitual del menor a la cuestión de la ilicitud. Véase:

Australia
S. Hanbury-Brown and R. Hanbury-Brown v. Director General of Community Services (Central Authority),  (1996) FLC 92-671 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 69];

Austria
3Ob89/05t, Oberster Gerichtshof, 11/05/2005 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 855];

6Ob183/97y, Oberster Gerichtshof, 19/06/1997 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 557];

Canadá
Droit de la famille 2675, Cour supérieure de Québec, 22 de abril de 1997, No 200-04-003138- 979 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 666];

Alemania
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 822];

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944];

Estados Unidos de América
Carrascosa v. McGuire, 520 F.3d 249 (3rd Cir. 2008), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 970].

El Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones para el 3º Circuito denegó el reconocimiento a una orden de no restitución dictada en España y concluyó que los tribunales españoles habían aplicado su propio Derecho en lugar del Derecho de Nueva Jersey al momento de evaluar si el padre solicitante tenía derechos de custodia.

Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH) 
El Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH) intervino en un caso de aplicación errónea de la interpretación de los derechos de custodia:

Monory v. Hungary & Romania, (2005) 41 E.H.R.R. 37, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 802].

En Monory, el TEDH resolvió que había habido una violación del derecho a la vida familiar previsto en el artículo 8 del Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH) dado que los tribunales rumanos habían malinterpretado el artículo 3 del Convenio de La Haya de manera tal que las garantías de este último instrumento fueron violadas.