CASE

No full text available

Case Name

W. v. W., 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/UKs 805

Court

Country

UNITED KINGDOM - SCOTLAND

Name

First Division, Inner House Court of Session

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Lord President (Lord Cullen), Lady Cosgrove and Lord Johnston

States involved

Requesting State

AUSTRALIA

Requested State

UNITED KINGDOM - SCOTLAND

Decision

Date

6 December 2003

Status

Final

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

Order

Appeal allowed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(b) 13(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(b) 13(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716; Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1993] 2 All ER 683; Re T. (Abduction: Child's objection to return) [2000] 2 FLR 192; Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249.
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Child's Objection
Exercise of Discretion
Nature and Strength of Objection
Parental Influence on the Views of Children
Separate Representation
Grave Risk of Harm
UK - England and Wales Case Law

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The application related to four children aged between 3 1/2 and 9 at the date of the hearing. The eldest child was a child of the mother by a previous relationship. The family emigrated from Scotland to Australia in 1998. The youngest child was born in Australia in 1999.

The parents separated in November 2001. A court order made on 14 January 2002 awarded the father contact rights in respect of the children. Several days later the mother unilaterally removed the children to Scotland. The father petitioned for the return of the children.

At trial on 25 March 2003 it was conceded that the removal had been wrongful. The Outer House of the Court of Session refused to make a return order. The Court found that the eldest child objected to being returned and it exercised its discretion not to return her.

The other children were not returned as to separate them from their sister would place them in an intolerable situation, see: PW v. AL or W 2003 SCLR 478 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 508]. The father appealed.

Ruling

Appeal allowed and return ordered; the trial judge had erred in his interpretation of Article 13(2). Reassessing the nature of the objections of the eldest child the Inner House concluded that they were not of sufficient weight to activate the exception. The eldest child being returned the younger siblings would therefore be returned also.

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The Lord Ordinary did not find that there was any intolerable feature of the children's lives in Australia immediately prior to their wrongful abduction. But he concluded that returning them to Australia without their mother who had cared for them for all of their lives would place them in an intolerable situation. The Inner House agreed with that view. However, it considered that the Lord Ordinary had erred in ruling that it was for the Australian authorities to make a satisfactory visa available, rather he could have provided that the execution of any order for the children's return was suspended until the Australian authorities had, on receiving an application from the mother, provided suitable visas for both her and the children.

Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

The Inner House overruled the interpretation of Article 13(2) given by the trial judge. Furthermore in its analysis of the provision it departed from earlier Scottish appellate authority (Urness v Minto 1994 SC 249, INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs79) placing greater reliance on recent English appellate authority (Re T (Abduction: Child's objection to return) [2000] 2 FLR 192, INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs270). The Court held that in a case like the present one where a separate defence arose in respect of one child only, a decision to give effect to the wishes of that child ought not to be regarded as necessarily sealing the fate of all the children. The question of their returns ought not to be regarded as necessarily determined by the objection expressed by one of them. The trial judge was therefore not entitled, in the absence of any evidence, to proceed on his own assumption as to the effect of his decision about the eldest child on the situation of the other three children. At trial the eldest child had been interviewed in private by the judge in the presence of her solicitor and she expressed her objections to him. The Inner House drew attention to dangers in such an approach and recommended that careful consideration be given before interviewing a child and, if it this were to be undertaken, on the most appropriate method of approaching such a sensitive task. Turning to the issue of the child's maturity the Inner House noted that this had not been the subject of any expert evaluation and given her age the appeal judges questioned whether the trial judge had sufficient material to entitle him to reach the view he did on this aspect of the case. The Inner House ruled though that the trial judge had erred in having found the child to have the requisite maturity to then immediately turn to the exercise of his discretion whether to make a return order. The Inner House held that the trial judge ought first to have considered the separate issue of whether it was appropriate for him to take account of the child's views. That required an assessment of the strength and validity of those views which, in turn, required consideration of the reasons given by the child for her objection. The exercise of discretion properly arises only once the court is satisfied, by reference to the child's reasons, as to the strength and validity of the objection. Reviewing the evidence the appeal judges concluded that the reasons advanced by the child for objecting to going back were not of sufficient validity and strength to cross the high threshold and to permit the Court to take account of the her views. Consequently the application for her return must be granted.

INCADAT comment

Several subsequent hearings considered the issue of visas for the mother and children, see notably the judgment of the Inner House of 7 August 2003.

Exercise of Discretion

Where it is established that a child objects to a return and he is of sufficient age and maturity at which it is appropriate to take his views into account, then the Court seised of the case will have a discretion whether or not to make a return order.

Different approaches have been espoused as to the manner in which this discretion should be exercised and the relevant factors that should be taken into consideration.

Australia 
Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 904]

The appellate court found that the trial judge had erred in ruling that there had to be 'clear and compelling' reasons to frustrate the objectives of the Convention. The Court recalled that there were permitted exceptions to a mandatory return and where established these exceptions gave rise to a discretion. The relevant factors in the exercise of that discretion would vary according to each case, but would include giving significant weight to the objectives of the Convention in appropriate cases.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The exercise of the discretion has caused difficulty for the Court of Appeal, in particular the factors to be considered and the weight to be accorded to them.

In the first key case: 

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 87]

The Court of Appeal held that a court's discretion to refuse the immediate return of a child must be exercised with regard to the overall approach of the Convention, i.e. a child's best interests are furthered by a prompt return, unless there are exceptional circumstances for ordering otherwise.

In Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 60] contrasting views were put forward by two members of the panel.

Balcombe L.J., who was content for there to be a relatively flexible approach to the gateway findings of age and objection, held that the weight to be given to objections would vary with the age of the child, but the policy of the Convention would always be a very weighty factor.

Millet L.J., who advocated a stricter interpretation of the gateway filters, held that if it was appropriate to consider the views of a child then those views should prevail unless there were countervailing factors, which would include the policy of the Convention.

The third member of the panel gave his support to the interpretation of Balcombe L.J.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. took up the interpretation of Millett L.J.

The reasoning of Re. T. was implicitly accepted by a differently constituted Court of Appeal in:

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 579].

However, it was rejected in Zaffino v. Zaffino (Abduction: Children's Views) [2005] EWCA Civ 1012; [2006] 1 FLR 410 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 813].

The correct approach to the exercise of judicial discretion in England is now clearly that advanced by Balcombe L.J.

In Zaffino v. Zaffino the Court also held that regard could be paid to welfare considerations in the exercise of the discretion.  In that case, welfare considerations militated in favour of a return.

In Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 829] the Court of Appeal considered how discretion should be exercised in a case governed by the Brussels II a Regulation.  It held that the aims and policy of the Regulation had to be considered in addition to the policy of the Convention.

In Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901] the Court gave a general consideration to welfare considerations in deciding not to order the return of the 8 year old girl concerned.

The Court also appeared to accept an obiter comment raised in Vigreux v. Michel that there had to be an ‘exceptional' dimension to a case before a Court might consider exercising its discretion against a return order.

Exceptionality was raised in Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 964].  There a return order was made notwithstanding the strong objections of an independent 12 year old.  Particular emphasis was placed on the fact that the girl had come for a 2 week vacation.

In Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937] the House of Lords affirmed that it was wrong to import any test of exceptionality into the exercise of discretion under the Hague Convention. The circumstances in which a return may be refused were themselves exceptions to the general rule. That in itself was sufficient exceptionality. It was neither necessary nor desirable to import an additional gloss into the Convention.

Baroness Hale continued that where a discretion arose from the terms of the Convention itself, the discretion was at large.  In Article 13(2) cases the court would have to consider the nature and strength of the child's objections, the extent to which they were authentically the child's own or the product of the influence of the abducting parent, the extent to which they coincided or were at odds with other considerations which were relevant to the child's welfare, as well as general Convention considerations. The older the child, the greater the weight that objections would likely carry.

New Zealand
The Balcombe / Millett interpretations gave rise to contrasting High Court judgments. The Court of Appeal however voiced its preference for the Balcombe ‘shades of grey' approach in:

White v. Northumberland [2006] NZFLR 1105 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 902].

United Kingdom - Scotland
P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 963]

When exercising his discretion to make a return order, the trial judge noted that a return order should not be refused unless there were sound reasons for not giving effect to the objects of the Convention.  This was upheld on appeal.  The Inner House of the Court of Session further held that the existence of the Article 13 exceptions did not negate or eliminate the general policy of the Convention that wrongfully removed children should be returned.

Singh v. Singh 1998 SC 68 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 197]

The Court held that the welfare of the child was a general factor which should be taken into account in the exercise of discretion. A court should not limit itself to a consideration of the child's objection and the reasons for it. Nevertheless, the court held that a rule could not be laid down as to whether a child's welfare should be considered broadly or in detail; this was a matter within the discretion of the court concerned.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House held that a balancing exercise had to be carried out, and one of the factors in favour of return was the spirit and purpose of the Convention to allow the court of habitual residence to resolve the custody dispute.

United States of America
De Silva v. Pitts, 481 F.3d 1279, (10th Cir. 2007), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 903].

In upholding the views of a 14 year old boy the Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit paid regard to his best interests but not to the policy of the Convention.

France
An appellate court limited the weight to be placed on the objections of the children on the basis that before being interviewed they had had no contact with the applicant parent and had spent a long period of time with the abducting parent. Moreover the allegations of the children had already been considered by the authorities in the children's State of habitual residence:

CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947].

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Parental Influence on the Views of Children

Courts applying Article 13(2) have recognised that it is essential to determine whether the objections of the child concerned have been influenced by the abducting parent. 

Courts in a variety of Contracting States have dismissed claims under Article 13(2) where it is apparent that the child is not expressing personally formed views, see in particular:

Australia
Director General of the Department of Community Services v. N., 19 August 1994, transcript, Family Court of Australia (Sydney) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 231];

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 754];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 87].

Although not at issue in the case, the Court of Appeal affirmed that little or no weight should be given to objections if the child had been influenced by the abducting parent or some other person.

Finland
Court of Appeal of Helsinki: No. 2933 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FI 863];

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947].
 
The Court of Appeal of Bordeaux limited the weight to be placed on the objections of the children on the basis that before being interviewed they had had no contact with the applicant parent and had spent a long period of time with the abducting parent. Moreover the allegations of the children had already been considered by the authorities in the children's State of habitual residence.

Germany
4 UF 223/98, Oberlandesgericht Düsseldorf, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 820];

Hungary
Mezei v. Bíró 23.P.500023/98/5. (27. 03. 1998, Central District Court of Budapest; First Instance); 50.Pkf.23.732/1998/2. 16. 06. 1998., (Capital Court as Appellate Court) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HU 329];

Israel
Appl. App. Dist. Ct. 672/06, Supreme Court 15 October 2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 885];

United Kingdom - Scotland
A.Q. v. J.Q., 12 December 2001, transcript, Outer House of the Court of Session (Scotland) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 415];

Spain
Auto Audiencia Provincial Nº 133/2006 Pontevedra (Sección 1ª), Recurso de apelación Nº 473/2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 887];

Restitución de Menores 534/1997 AA [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 908].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has held that the views of children could never be entirely independent; therefore a distinction had to be made between a manipulated objection and an objection, which whilst not entirely autonomous, nevertheless merited consideration, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795].

United States of America
Robinson v. Robinson, 983 F. Supp. 1339 (D. Colo. 1997) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 128].

In this case the District Court held that it would be unrealistic to expect a caring parent not to influence the child's preference to some extent, therefore the issue to be ascertained was whether the influence was undue.

It has been held in two cases that evidence of parental influence should not be accepted as a justification for not ascertaining the views of children who would otherwise be heard, see:

Germany
2 BvR 1206/98, Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal Constitutional Court) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 233];

New Zealand
Winters v. Cowen [2002] NZFLR 927 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 473].

Equally parental influence may not have a material impact on the child's views, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

The Court of Appeal did not dismiss the suggestion that the child's views may have been influenced or coloured by immersion in an atmosphere of hostility towards the applicant father, but it was not prepared to give much weight to such suggestions.

In an Israeli case the court found that the child had been brainwashed by his mother and held that his views should therefore be given little weight. Nevertheless, the Court also held that the extreme nature of the child's reactions to the proposed return, which included the threat of suicide, could not be ignored.  The court concluded that the child would face a grave risk of harm if sent back, see:

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 834].

Separate Representation

There is a lack of uniformity in English speaking jurisdictions with regard to separate representation for children.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
An early appellate judgment established that in keeping with the summary nature of Convention proceedings, separate representation should only be allowed in exceptional circumstances.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 56].

Reaffirmed by:

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881];

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905].

The exceptional circumstances standard has been established in several cases, see:

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 57];

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 180];

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 168];

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 579];

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 829];

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 964].

In Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881] it was suggested by Thorpe L.J. that the bar had been raised by the Brussels II a Regulation insofar as applications for party status were concerned.

This suggestion was rejected by Baroness Hale in:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880]. Without departing from the exceptional circumstances test, she signalled the need, in the light of the new Community child abduction regime, for a re-appraisal of the way in which the views of abducted children were to be ascertained. In particular she argued for views to be sought at the outset of proceedings to avoid delays.

In Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905] Thorpe L.J. acknowledged that the bar had not been raised in applications for party status.  He rejected the suggestion that the bar had been lowered by the House of Lords in Re D.

However, in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937] Baroness Hale again intervened in the debate and affirmed that a directions judge should evaluate whether separate representation would add enough to the Court's understanding of the issues to justify the resultant intrusion, delay and expense which would follow.  This would suggest a more flexible test, however, she also added that children should not be given an exaggerated impression of the relevance and importance of their views and in the general run of cases party status would not be accorded.

Australia
Australia's supreme jurisdiction sought to break from an exceptional circumstances test in De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

However, the test was reinstated by the legislator in the Family Law Amendment Act 2000, see: Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

See:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
Children heard under Art 13(2) can be assisted by a lawyer (art 338-5 NCPC and art 388-1 Code Civil - the latter article specifies however that children so assisted are not conferred the status of a party to the proceedings), see:

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 853].

In Scotland & New Zealand there has been a much greater willingness to allow children separate representation, see for example:

United Kingdom - Scotland
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962];

M. Petitioner 2005 SLT 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 508];

New Zealand
K.S v.L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 532].

UK - England and Wales Case Law

The English Court of Appeal has taken a very strict approach to Article 13 (1) b) and it is rare indeed for the exception to be upheld.  Examples of where the standard has been reached include:

Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 8];

Re M. (Abduction: Psychological Harm) [1997] 2 FLR 690, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 86];

Re M. (Abduction: Leave to Appeal) [1999] 2 FLR 550, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 263];

Re D. (Article 13B: Non-return) [2006] EWCA Civ 146, [2006] 2 FLR 305, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 818];

Klentzeris v. Klentzeris [2007] EWCA Civ 533, [2007] 2 FLR 996 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 931].

Faits

La demande concernait 4 enfants âgés de 3 ans 1/2 à 9 ans à la date de l'audience. L'aînée était née d'un premier lit de la mère. En 1998, la famille avait quitté l'Ecosse pour s'installer en Australie, où naquit le plus jeune des enfants. Deux ans plus tard, en 2001, les parents se séparèrent. Par décision du 14 janvier 2002, le père obtint un droit de visite. Plusieurs jours plus tard, la mère emmena les enfants en Ecosse.

Le père demanda le retour des enfants. Lors de l'audience, le 25 mars 2003, il fut décidé que le déplacement avait été illicite. Le juge de première instance refusa toutefois d'ordonner le retour des enfants au motif que l'aînée s'y opposait et que séparer les enfants de leur soeur aînée les placerait dans une situation intolérable. La père interjeta appel.

Dispositif

Recours accueilli et retour ordonné. Le premier juge avait mal interprété l'article 13 alinéa 2. Reconsidérant l'opposition de l'aînée, la cour d'appel conclut qu'elle n'était pas d'un poids suffisant pour déclencher l'application de l'exception. Puisque l'aînée devait être renvoyée en Australie, les plus jeunes devaient également y retourner.

Motifs

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

Le premier juge avait considéré que la vie des enfants en Australie immédiatement avant leur enlèvement n'avait rien d'intolérable, mais que leur retour en Australie sans la mère, alors qu'elle s'était occupée d'eux toute leur vie les aurait placés dans une situation intolérable. La cour d'appel accepta cette position. Toutefois, elle considéra que le premier juge n'aurait pas dû décider qu'il appartenait aux autorités australiennes de faire en sorte que la mère obtienne un visa acceptable; le juge aurait simplement pu décoder de suspendre l'exécution de l'ordonnance de retour jusqu'à ce que les autorités australiennes délivrent, sur demande de la mère, les visas nécessaires et appropriés pour les enfants et elle.

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)

La cour d'appel rejeta l'interprétation donnée par le juge de première instance à l'article 13 alinéa 2. Elle se démarqua par ailleurs dans son analyse de cet article de la ligne jurisprudentielle écossaise qui avait émergé de l'arrêt Urness v Minto 1994 SC 249, Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs79, préférant suivre une décision d'appel anglaise plus récente (Re T (Abduction: Child's objection to return) [2000] 2 FLR 192, Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs270). La cour d'appel estima que dans des cas comme le cas d'espèce, où on fait valoir des arguments différents au regard d'un des enfants en cause, il convenait de ne pas nécessairement lier le sort des autres enfants à celui du premier. Ainsi la question du retour des trois plus jeunes enfants ne devait pas nécessairement être dépendre nécessairement de l'opposition au retour exprimée par l'aînée. En l'absence d'autres preuves, le premier juge n'aurait pas dû partir du principe que sa décision à l'égard de l'aînée aurait un impact sur celle relative aux plus jeunes. En première instance, l'aînée avait été entendue par le juge en privé, en présence de son avocat, et lui avait fait part de son opposition au retour. La cour d'appel souligna le danger inhérent à une telle approche et recommanda que l'audition de l'enfant ne soit pas décidée à la légère et, souligna que dans le cas où il convenait en effet d'entendre l'enfant, il importait de réfléchir au meilleur moyen de mener l'audition dans un domaine aussi sensible. S'agissant de la maturité de l'enfant, la cour d'appel, relevant que cette question n'avait pas fait l'objet d'une expertise, se demanda vu l'âge de l'enfant en cause si le premier juge avait pu à bon escient pervenir à une conclusion sur cet aspect des choses à la lumière des éléments dont il disposait. La cour d'appel considéra que le premier juge n'aurait pas dû estimer que l'enfant avait une maturité suffisante pour immédiatement se poser la question de l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire lui permettant de décider ou non d'ordonner le retour. La cour d'appel estima que le premier juge aurait dû d'abord se demander s'il était approprié de prendre en compte l'avis de l'enfant. Ceci impliquait une évaluation de la force et de la validité de l'opposition de l'enfant et la recherche des raisons qui la poussaient à s'opposer à son retour. La question de l'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire du juge ne se posait qu'ensuite, une fois que celui-ci était convaincu, du fait des raisons évoquées par l'enfant, de la force et de la validité de l'opposition de celui-ci. S'intéressant aux éléments de preuves dont ele disposait, la cour d'appel conclut que les raisons évoquées par l'enfant n'étaient pas suffisantes pour justifier le déclenchement de l'exception et donner au juge le pouvoir d'accorder de l'importance à l'opposition de l'enfant. La demande de retour devait donc être accueillie quant à l'aînée des enfants.

Commentaire INCADAT

Plusieurs audiences s'ensuivirient, qui se concentrèrent sur la question des visas de la mère et des enfants ; voir par exemple l'arrêt de la cour d'appel du 7 août 2003.

Exercice d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire

Lorsqu'il est établi qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour et a un âge et une maturité suffisants pour qu'il soit approprié de tenir compte de son opinion, le tribunal saisi a un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour décider d'ordonner ou non le retour de l'enfant. 

Des approches différentes se sont fait jour quant à la manière dont ce pouvoir discrétionnaire peut être exercé et quant aux différents facteurs à considérer dans ce cadre. 

Australie        
Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 904]

La Cour d'appel estima que le juge du premier degré n'aurait pas dû considérer qu'il devait y avoir des arguments « clairs et convaincants » pour aller à l'encontre des objectifs de la Convention. La Cour rappela que la Convention prévoyait un nombre limité d'exceptions au retour et que si ces exceptions étaient applicables, la Cour disposait d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire. Il convenait pour cela de s'intéresser à l'ensemble des circonstances de la cause tout en accordant si nécessaire, un poids important aux objectifs de la Convention.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
L'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire a causé des difficultés à la Cour d'appel notamment en ce qui concerne les éléments à prendre en compte et le poids qu'il convenait de leur accorder. 

Dans la première décision phare, Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 87], la Cour d'appel estima que le pouvoir discrétionnaire de refuser le retour immédiat d'un enfant devait être exercé en tenant compte de l'approche globale de la Convention, c'est-à-dire de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant à être renvoyé, à moins que des circonstances exceptionnelles existent qui conduisent au refus.

Dans Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 60], des opinions différentes furent défendues par deux des juges d'appel :

Le juge Balcombe L.J., favorable à une approche relativement flexible quant aux éléments de l'âge et de l'opposition,  défendit l'idée que certes l'importance  à accorder à l'opposition de l'enfant devait varier en fonction de son âge mais qu'en tout état de cause, les objectifs de la Convention devaient être un facteur primordial. 

Le juge Millet L.J., qui soutenait une approche plus stricte des conditions d'application de l'exception - âge et opposition - se prononça en faveur de l'idée que l'opposition de l'enfant devait prévaloir à moins que des éléments contraires, y compris les objectifs de la Convention, doivent primer.

Le troisième juge se rangea à l'opinion du juge Balcombe L.J.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. suivit l'interprétation du juge Millett L.J.

Le raisonnement de Re. T fut ensuite implicitement suivi par un collège de juges autrement composé de la Cour d'appel :

Re J. (Children) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 579]

Il fut toutefois rejeté dans l'affaire Zaffino v. Zaffino (Abduction: Children's Views) [2005] EWCA Civ 1012; [2006] 1 FLR 410 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 813].

La jurisprudence anglaise suit désormais l'approche du juge Balcombe L.J.

Dans Zaffino v. Zaffino, la cour estima qu'il convenait également de tirer les conséquences du principe de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant.  Cet intérêt militait en l'espèce en faveur du retour. 

Dans Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 829] la Cour d'appel considéra comment ce pouvoir discrétionnaire devait s'appliquer dans les affaires régies par le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis. Elle estima que les buts et objectifs du Règlement devaient être pris en compte en plus des objectifs de la Convention. 

Dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901] la Cour suivit l'intérêt de l'enfant et refusa d'ordonner le retour de la fillette de 8 ans qui était en cause. La Cour sembla suivre le commentaire obiter exprimé dans Vigreux selon lequel la décision de ne pas ordonner le retour d'un enfant devait être liée à une dimension « exceptionnelle » du cas.

La dimension exceptionnelle fut discutée dans l'affaire Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 964]. Une ordonnance de retour fut prononcée nonobstant l'opposition forte d'une enfant indépendante de 12 ans. En l'espèce le fait que le problème était apparu à l'occasion de vacances de 2 semaines fut un facteur déterminant.

Dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937] la Chambre des Lords affirma qu'il convenait de ne pas importer la notion de caractère exceptionnel dans le cadre de l'exercice d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire ouvert par la Convention. Les circonstances dans lesquelles le retour peut être refusé sont elles-mêmes des exceptions au principe général, ce qui en soi est une dimension exceptionnelle suffisante. Il n'était ni nécessaire ni désirable d'exiger une dimension exceptionnelle supplémentaire.

Le juge Hale ajouta que lorsque la Convention ouvre la porte à un exercice discrétionnaire, ce pouvoir discrétionnaire était illimité. Dans les affaires relevant de l'article 13(2), il appartenait aux juges de considérer la nature et la force de l'opposition de l'enfant, dans quelle mesure cette opposition émane de l'enfant lui-même ou est influencée par le parent ravisseur, et enfin, dans quelle mesure cette opposition est dans le prolongement de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant et des objectifs généraux de la Convention. Plus l'enfant était âgé, plus son opposition devait en principe compter.

Nouvelle-Zélande
Les interprétations de Balcombe / Millett donnèrent lieu à des jugements contrastés de la High Court. Toutefois, la Cour d'appel s'exprima en faveur de l'approche de Balcombe dans :

White v. Northumberland [2006] NZFLR 1105 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 902].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 963

Dans le cadre de l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire d'ordonner le retour, le juge de première instance avait observé que le retour devait être ordonné à moins que de bonnes raisons justifient qu'il soit fait exception à la Convention. Cette position fut approuvée par la cour d'appel, qui estima que l'existence des exceptions ne niait pas le principe général selon lequel les enfants victimes de déplacements illicites devaient être renvoyés.

Singh v. Singh 1998 SC 68 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 197]

La Cour estima que le bien-être de l'enfant était un élément à prendre en compte dans le cadre de  l'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire. Le juge ne devait pas se limiter à une simple considération de l'opposition de l'enfant et de ses raisons. Toutefois la Cour décida qu'aucune règle ne pouvait s'appliquer quant à la question de savoir si l'intérêt de l'enfant devait s'entendre de manière large ou faire l'objet d'une analyse détaillée ; cette question relevait du pouvoir discrétionnaire de la cour. 

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805], l'instance d'appel estima qu'il convenait de mettre en balance tous les éléments, l'un des éléments en faveur du retour étant l'esprit et l'objectif de la Convention de faire en sorte que la question de la garde soit tranchée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant. 

États-Unis d'Amérique
De Silva v. Pitts, 481 F.3d 1279, (10th Cir. 2007), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 903

La Cour d'appel tint compte de l'opposition d'un enfant de 14 ans, tirant les conséquences de son intérêt supérieur mais non de l'objectif de la Convention.

France
Une juridiction d'appel modéra la force probante de l'opposition au motif que les enfants avaient vécu longuement avec le parent et sans contact avec le parent victime avant d'être entendus, observant également que les faits dénoncés par les enfants avaient par ailleurs été pris en compte par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle:

CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947].

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Influence parentale sur l'opinion de l'enfant

Les juridictions appliquant l'article 13(2) ont reconnu qu'il était essentiel de définir si l'opposition de l'enfant au retour avait été influencée par le parent ravisseur.

Les juges de nombreux États contractants ont rejeté les arguments fondés sur l'article 13(2) lorsqu'il était clair que l'enfant n'exprimait pas une opinion indépendante.

Voir notamment :

Australie
Director General of the Department of Community Services v. N., 19 août 1994, transcription, Family Court of Australia (Sydney), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 231] ;

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 754] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 87].

Bien que la question ne se soit pas posée en l'espèce, la Cour d'appel a affirmé que peu ou pas de poids devait être accordé à l'opposition d'un enfant si celui-ci a été influencé par le parent ravisseur ou toute autre personne.

Finlande
Cour d'appel d'Helsinki: No. 2933, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 863].

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947].

Une juridiction d'appel modéra la force probante de l'opposition au motif que les enfants avaient vécu longuement avec le parent ravisseur et sans contact avec le parent victime avant d'être entendus, observant également que les faits dénoncés par les enfants avaient par ailleurs été pris en compte par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle.

Allemagne
4 UF 223/98, Oberlandesgericht Düsseldorf, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 820] ;

Hongrie
Mezei v. Bíró 23.P.500023/98/5. (27. 03. 1998, Central District Court of Budapest; First Instance); 50.Pkf.23.732/1998/2. 16. 06. 1998., (Capital Court as Appellate Court) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HU 329] ;

Israël
Appl. App. Dist. Ct. 672/06, Supreme Court 15 October 2006 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 885] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
A.Q. v. J.Q., 12 December 2001, transcript, Outer House of the Court of Session (Scotland) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 415] ;

Espagne
Auto Audiencia Provincial Nº 133/2006 Pontevedra (Sección 1ª), Recurso de apelación Nº 473/2006 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 887] ;

Restitución de Menores 534/1997 AA [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 908].

Suisse
Le Tribunal fédéral suisse a estimé que l'opposition des enfants ne pouvait jamais être entièrement indépendante. Dès lors il convenait de distinguer selon que l'enfant avait ou non été manipulé. Voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Robinson v. Robinson, 983 F. Supp. 1339 (D. Colo. 1997), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 128].

Dans cette espèce, la District Court estima qu'il ne serait pas réaliste de prétendre qu'un parent aimant n'influence pas la préférence de l'enfant dans une certaine mesure de sorte que la question de savoir si l'un des parents a indûment influencé l'enfant ne devrait pas se poser.

Toutefois il a été décidé dans deux affaires que la preuve de l'influence parentale ne devrait pas empêcher l'audition d'un enfant. Voir :

Allemagne
2 BvR 1206/98, Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal Constitutional Court),[Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 233] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
Winters v. Cowen [2002] NZFLR 927, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 473].

Il se peut également que l'influence d'un parent n'ait que peu d'effet sur la position de l'enfant. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

La Cour d'appel ne rejeta pas la suggestion selon laquelle l'opinion de l'enfant avait été influencée ou que celui-ci avait été entraîné à penser d'une certaine façon du fait de son immersion dans une atmosphère hostile au père, mais n'y accorda que peu d'importance.

Dans une affaire israélienne, le juge estima que l'enfant avait subi un véritable lavage de cerveau de la part de la mère de sorte que son opinion ne devait pas être prise au sérieux. Toutefois le juge considéra que la nature extrême des réactions de l'enfant interrogé sur un possible retour (menace de suicide) était telle que son opinion ne pouvait être ignorée. Le juge estima dans ce cas que le retour exposerait l'enfant à un risque grave de danger. Voir :

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 834].

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - article 13(2)

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - ARTICLE 13(2)

On constate une absence d'uniformité dans les États de langue anglaise quant à la question de la représentation autonome des enfants à la procédure. 

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans des décisions anciennes rendues par la Cour d'appel on considérait qu'étant donné le caractère sommaire de la procédure relative à la Convention, une représentation séparée des enfants en cause ne devait être admise que dans des cas exceptionnels.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 56] ;

Position reprise dans :

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881] ;

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905].

Le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles fut admis dans les affaires suivantes :

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 57] ;

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 180] ;

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 168] ;

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 579] ;

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 829] ;

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 964].

Dans Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881]; le juge Thorpe L.J. estima que les exigences avaient été rendues plus strictes par le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis, dans la mesure où elles concernaient les demandes relatives au statut des parties.

Cette position fut rejetée par le juge Hale :

Sans toutefois remettre en cause le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles, le juge Hale de la Chambre des Lords signala dans l'affaire Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] la nécessité de revoir la manière dont la position des enfants en cause est recherchée, à la lumière des exigences du nouveau régime communautaire de l'enlèvement d'enfants. En particulier elle souligna l'importance de rechercher si l'enfant s'oppose à son retour dès le début de la procédure afin d'éviter des retards.

Dans Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905] le juge Thorpe L.J. reconnut que le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis ne rendait pas plus strictes les exigences en matière de statut des parties ; il rejeta également l'idée que Re D. assouplissait ces exigences.

Toutefois, dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @937@] le juge Hale intervint de nouveau dans ce débat pour affirmer qu'un juge de la mise en état devait évaluer si une représentation autonome de l'enfant était de nature à permettre à la cour de gagner tant en compréhension que cela pourrait justifier l'intrusion, le retard et le coût qu'un tel statut entraînerait. Une telle approche semble suggérer un critère plus flexible, cependant elle ajouta également que les enfants ne doivent pas avoir une impression exagérée de l'importance et de la pertinence de leur opinion, précisant qu'en général, ceux-ci ne devraient pas intervenir en tant que parties. 

Australie
La cour suprême d'Australie a tenté de se départir du critère des circonstances exceptionnelles dans l'affaire De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93].

Toutefois, l'exigence de circonstances exceptionnelles fut rétablie par le législateur dans le cadre d'une réforme du droit de la famille en 2000. Voir : Family Law Amendment Act 2000, et Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

Voir:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
En France, les enfants entendus dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) peuvent être assistés d'un avocat (art 338-5 NCPC et art 388-1 Code Civil - cette dernière disposition précise cependant que l'audition assistée d'un avocat ne leur confère pas le statut de partie à la procédure). Voir :

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 853].

En Écosse et en Nouvelle-Zélande, on constate que les tribunaux admettent plus facilement qu'un enfant soit représenté séparément à la procédure. Voir par exemple :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @962@];

M Petitioner 2005 SLT 2, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 508];

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S v. L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 532].

Jurisprudence du Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles

La Cour d'appel anglaise a adopté une position très stricte quant à l'exception du risque grave de l'article 13(1) b) et il est rare qu'elle considère cette disposition applicable. Parmi les décisions ayant refusé d'ordonner le retour, voir :

Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 8] ;

Re M. (Abduction: Psychological Harm) [1997] 2 FLR 690, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 86] ;

Re M. (Abduction: Leave to Appeal) [1999] 2 FLR 550, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 263] ;

Re D. (Article 13B: Non-return) [2006] EWCA Civ 146, [2006] 2 FLR 305, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 818] ;

Klentzeris v. Klentzeris [2007] EWCA Civ 533, [2007] 2 FLR 996  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 931].

Hechos

La solicitud se refería a cuatro menores que tenían entre tres años y medio y nueve años a la fecha de la audiencia. La mayor era hija de una relación anterior de la madre. La familia emigró de Escocia a Australia en 1998. El hijo menor nació en Australia en 1999. Los padres se separaron en noviembre de 2001. Una decisión judicial dictada el 14 de enero de 2002 otorgó al padre derechos de visita respecto de los menores. Unos días después la madre se llevó a los menores a Escocia en forma unilateral.

El padre peticionó la restitución de los menores. En juicio el 25 de marzo de 2003 se declaró que la sustracción había sido ilícita. La Cámara Externa (Outer House) del Tribunal Superior de Justicia se rehusó a ordenar la restitución. El Tribunal se encontró con que la hija mayor se oponía a ser restituida y ejerció su discrecionalidad en no restituirla. Los otros hijos no fueron restituidos por cuanto el separarlos de su hermana los pondría en una situación intolerable. El padre apeló.

Fallo

Se hizo lugar a la apelación y se ordenó la restitución; el juez de primera instancia se había equivocado en su interpretación del artículo 13, letra (2). Volviendo a estimar la naturaleza de las objeciones de la hija mayor la Cámara Interna (Inner House) concluyó que no eran de pesos suficiente como para activar la excepción. Al ser restituida la hija mayor, los hermanos menores también lo serían.

Fundamentos

Grave riesgo - art. 13(1)(b)

El magistrado no entendió que existiera ninguna característica intolerable en la vida de los menores en Australia inmediatamente anterior a su sustracción ilícita. Pero concluyó que restituirlos a Australia sin su madre quien los había cuidado durante toda la vida los pondría en una situación intolerable. La Cámara Interna (Inner House) estuvo de acuerdo con esa postura. Sin embargo consideró que el magistrado se había equivocado al establecer que correspondía a las autoridades australianas poner a disposición una visa adecuada; en vez de ello, pudo haber dispuesto que la ejecución de cualquier orden de restitución de los menores se suspendiera hasta tanto, al recibir la solicitud de la madre, las autoridades australianas hayan provisto visas adecuadas para ella y para los menores.

Objeciones del niño a la restitución - art. 13(2)

La Cámara Interna (Inner House) revocó la interpretación del artículo 13, apartado 2) dada por el juez de primera instancia. Asimismo, en su análisis de la disposición se apartó de la anterior autoridad de apelación escocesa (Urness v Minto 1994 SC 249, INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79) poniendo mayor confianza en la reciente autoridad de apelación inglesa (Re T (Abduction: Child's objection to return) [2000] 2 FLR 192, INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 270). El Tribunal sostuvo en un caso como el presente en el que se presentó una defensa separada respecto de sólo uno de los menores, un fallo que hace lugar a los deseos de ese menor no debería considerarse que necesariamente marca el destino de todos los menores. La cuestión de sus restituciones no debe considerarse que necesariamente se determina por la objeción expresada por uno de ellos. Por lo tanto, en ausencia de pruebas el juez de primera instancia no estaba habilitado a proceder según su propia hipótesis en cuanto al efecto que su decisión respecto de la hija mayor en el caso podía tener en los otros tres menores. En el juicio la hija mayor había sido entrevistada en privado por el juez en presencia de su abogado y ella expresó sus objeciones. La Cámara Interna (Inner House) presto atención a los peligros de tal enfoque y recomendó una cuidadosa consideración antes de entrevistar a un menor, y en caso de procederse a la entrevista, aconsejó la forma más adecuada de realizar esa delicada tarea. Volviendo a la cuestión de la madurez de la menor, la Cámara Interna (Inner House) advirtió que ello no había sido el objeto de una evaluación pericial y dada su edad, los jueces de apelación cuestionaron si el juez de primera instancia contaba con pruebas suficientes que lo habilitaran para alcanzar la postura que tomó en este aspecto del caso. La Cámara Interna (Inner House) determinó que el juez de primera instancia se había equivocado al entender que la menor tenía la madurez requerida para pasar en forma inmediata al ejercicio de su discrecionalidad para expedir o no la orden de restitución. La Cámara Interna (Inner House) sostuvo que el juez de primera instancia debió primero considerar la cuestion separada de si resultaba adecuado para él tener en cuenta la posición de la menor. Ello requería una evaluación de la fuerza y validez de tal posición que, a su vez, requería la consideración de las razones dadas por la menor para su objeción. El ejercicio de la discrecionalidad surge en forma aprodiada solo después de que el tribunal esté satisfecho en cuanto a la fuerza y validez de la objeción, por referencia a las razones de la menor. Revisando las pruebas los jueces de apelación concluyeron que las razones adelantadas por la menor para objetar el regreso no tenían la validez y la fuerza suficientes para cruzar el alto umbral y permitir al Tribunal tener en cuenta su postura. Consecuentemente, la solicitud de restitución debe otorgarse.

Comentario INCADAT

Varias audiencias posteriores consideraron el tema de las visas para la madre y los menores, véase señaladamente la sentencia de la Cámara Interna (Inner House) del 7 de agosto de 2003.

Ejercicio de la facultad discrecional

Cuando se determina que un menor se opone a la restitución y ha alcanzado una edad y un grado de madurez suficientes para que sea apropiado tener en cuenta sus opiniones, el tribunal que entiende en el caso tendrá la facultad discrecional para ordenar la restitución del menor o no hacerlo.

Se han propugnado diferentes enfoques respecto de la manera en la que debe ejercerse esta facultad discrecional y los factores relevantes que deben tenerse en consideración.

Australia
Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 904]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones determinó que el tribunal de primera instancia había cometido un error al decidir que debía haber motivos "claros y convincentes" para frustrar los fines del Convenio. El Tribunal recordó que el Convenio prevé un número limitado que excepciones a la restitución obligatoria y que, cuando son aplicables, el juez dispone de una facultad discrecional. Los factores relevantes en el ejercicio de la facultad discrecional serían distintos según el caso pero abarcarían conferirle un peso significativo a los fines del Convenio en los casos pertinentes.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
El ejercicio de la facultad discrecional ha resultado problemático para el Tribunal de Apelaciones, en particular, los factores que deben tenerse en cuenta y el peso que debe otorgársele a cada uno de ellos.

En el primer caso clave: 

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 87]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la facultad discrecional de un tribunal para rechazar la restitución inmediata de un menor debe ser ejercida teniendo en cuenta el enfoque global del Convenio, esto es, que el interés superior del menor se promueve mediante la pronta restitución, excepto que existan circunstancias extraordinarias para emitir una orden distinta.

En Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 60] dos miembros de la sala expresaron opiniones encontradas.

Lord Justice Balcombe, que propugnaba un enfoque relativamente flexible respecto de la determinación inicial de edad y objeción a la restitución, sostuvo que la importancia que debía otorgarse a las objeciones variaría según la edad del menor, sin embargo, la política del Convenio siempre sería un factor de mucho peso.

Lord Justice Millet, que defendía una interpretación más estricta de los filtros iniciales, sostuvo que, si correspondía considerar las opiniones del menor, dichas opiniones debían prevalecer, excepto que hubiera factores contrarios del mismo peso, entre ellos la política del Convenio.

El tercer miembro de la sala apoyó la interpretación de Lord Justice Balcombe.

En Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270] Lord Justice Ward adoptó la interpretación de Lord Justice Millett.

El razonamiento de Re. T. fue aceptado implícitamente por un Tribunal de Apelaciones integrado por diferentes miembros en:

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 579].

Sin embargo, fue rechazado en Zaffino v. Zaffino (Abduction: Children's Views) [2005] EWCA Civ 1012; [2006] 1 FLR 410 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 813].

El enfoque actual adecuado para el ejercicio de la facultad discrecional en Inglaterra es claramente el propugnado por Lord Justice Balcombe.

En Zaffino v. Zaffino, el tribunal también sostuvo que debía otorgarse importancia a los factores relativos al bienestar al momento de ejercer la facultad discrecional. En dicho caso, los factores relativos al bienestar favorecían la restitución.

En Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 829], el Tribunal de Apelaciones consideró cómo debía ejercerse la facultad discrecional en un caso regulado por el Reglamento Bruselas II bis. Se determinó que, además de la política del Convenio, debían tenerse en cuenta los fines y la política del Reglamento.

En Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901], el Tribunal consideró de manera general los factores relativos al bienestar al decidir no ordenar la restitución de la menor de ocho años involucrada. El Tribunal también pareció aceptar un comentario no determinante del caso Vigreux v. Michel según el cual debía existir una dimensión "excepcional" en un caso antes de que el Tribunal pudiera considerar ejercer su facultad discrecional contra una orden de restitución.

En Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 964], se invocó la excepcionalidad. En dicho caso, se dictó una orden de restitución a pesar de las fuertes objeciones de una menor independiente de doce años de edad. Se puso particular énfasis en el hecho de que la menor había ido de vacaciones por dos semanas.

En Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937], la Cámara de los Lores sostuvo que era incorrecto importar criterio de excepcionalidad alguno al ejercicio de la facultad discrecional en virtud del Convenio de La Haya. Las circunstancias en las que podía denegarse la restitución constituían, en sí mismas, excepciones a la regla general. Eso mismo era una excepcionalidad suficiente. No era necesario ni deseable importar glosa adicional alguna al Convenio.

La Baronesa Hale agregó que cuando la facultad discrecional surgía de los términos del Convenio mismo, ésta era amplia. En los casos del artículo 13(2), el tribunal tendría que considerar la naturaleza y la solidez de las objeciones del menor, la medida en la que dichas objeciones eran verdaderamente del menor o el producto de la influencia del progenitor sustractor, la medida en la que coincidían o se contraponían con otras consideraciones relevantes para el bienestar del menor, así como consideraciones generales del Convenio. Cuanto mayor sea el menor, mayor importancia tendrán probablemente sus objeciones.

Nueva Zelanda
Las interpretaciones de Balcombe / Millett dieron lugar a decisiones contradictorias del Tribunal Superior. El Tribunal de Apelaciones, sin embargo, se pronunció a favor del enfoque de ‘gamas de gris' de Balcombe:

White v. Northumberland [2006] NZFLR 1105 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 902].

Reino Unido - Escocia
P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 963]

Al ejercer su facultad discrecional para emitir una orden de restitución, el juez de primera instancia observó que no debía denegarse la orden de restitución excepto cuando hubiera motivos sensatos para no promover los fines del Convenio. Esto fue confirmado por el tribunal de apelaciones (Inner House of the Court of Session), el cual también sostuvo que la existencia de las excepciones del artículo 13 no negaba ni eliminaba la política general del Convenio según la cual deben restituirse los menores sustraídos ilícitamente.

Singh v. Singh 1998 SC 68 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 197]

El Tribunal sostuvo que el bienestar del menor era un factor general que debía ser considerado al ejercer la facultad discrecional. Un tribunal no debe limitarse a considerar la oposición del menor y los motivos por los cuales se opone a la restitución. Sin embargo, el tribunal sostuvo que no podía redactarse una norma respecto de si el bienestar del menor debía considerarse de manera amplia o detallada; éste era un asunto comprendido dentro del alcance de la facultad discrecional del tribunal en cuestión.

En W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 805], el tribunal de apelaciones (Inner House) sostuvo que el ejercicio debía ser equilibrado y que uno de los factores a favor de la restitución era el espíritu y el fin del Convenio de permitirle al tribunal de residencia habitual resolver la controversia relativa a la custodia.

Estados Unidos de América
De Silva v. Pitts, 481 F.3d 1279, (10th Cir. 2007), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 903]

Al hacer lugar a las opiniones de un menor de catorce años, el Tribunal de Apelaciones del Décimo Circuito tomó en consideración su interés superior e hizo caso omiso de la política del Convenio.

Francia
El Tribunal de apelaciones valoró la fuerza probatoria de la oposición de los niños, teniendo en cuenta que los mismos habían estado durante un largo tiempo con el padre sustractor y sin contacto con el padre privado de los niños antes de ser escuchados, observando asimismo que los hechos denunciados por los niños habían sido tenidos en cuenta por las autoridades del Estado de la residencia habitual.

CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947].

Naturaleza y tenor de la oposición

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

La máxima instancia de Australia (la High Court) adoptó una interpretación literal del término "objeción". Sin embargo, una reforma legislativa cambió la interpretacion posteriormente. Véase:

Art. 111B(1B) de la Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975) incorporada por la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000).

El artículo 13(2), incorporado al derecho australiano mediante la reg. 16(3) de las Regulaciones de Derecho de Familia (Sustracción de Menores) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), establece en la actualidad no solo que el menor debe oponerse a la restitución, sino que la objeción debe demostrar un sentimiento fuerte más allá de la mera expresión de una preferencia o simples deseos.

Véanse, por ejemplo:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 904].

La cuestión acerca de si un menor debe plantear una objeción expresamente al Estado de residencia habitual no ha sido resuelta. Véase:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 8/10/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 549].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 546].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Canadá
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 1028].

Para probar que un menor se opone a la restitución, ha de demostrarse que el menor "expresó un fuerte desacuerdo a regresar al pais de su residencia habitual. Su oposición ha de ser categórica. No puede determinarse simplemente pesando las ventajas y desventajas de los dos Estados en cuestión, como en el caso del análisis de su interés superior. Debe tratarse de algo más fuerte que de una mera expresión de preferencia".


Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En el caso Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 87], el Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la restitución a la que un menor se opone debe ser una restitución inmediata al país del que fue ilícitamente sustraído. El artículo 13 no contiene disposición alguna que permita considerar si el menor se opone a la restitución en ciertas circunstancias.

En Re M. (A Minor)(Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 56], se aceptó, sin embargo, que una objeción a la vida con el progenitor solicitante puede distinguirse de una objeción a la vida en el país de origen previo.

En Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], Lord Justice Ward planteó una serie de preguntas a fin de ayudar a determinar si es adecuado tener en cuenta las objeciones de un menor.

Estas preguntas fueron respaldadas por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el marco del caso Re M. (A Child)(Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901].

Para comentarios académicos ver: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

Francia
Las objeciones basadas exclusivamente en una preferencia por la vida en Francia o la vida con el padre sustractor no fueron admitidas, ver:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. c. F. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 63].

Reino Unido - Escocia
En el caso Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs79], se adoptó una interpretación amplia. La Inner House of the Court of Session (tribunal de apelaciones) aceptó que una fuerte preferencia por permanecer con el padre sustractor y por la vida en Escocia implicaba una objeción a la restitución a los Estados Unidos de América.

En W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 805], la Inner House of the Court of Session, que aceptó el criterio inicial de Re T. [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], sostuvo que las objeciones relativas a cuestiones de bienestar debían ser tratadas exclusivamente por las autoridades del Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

En el posterior caso de primera instancia: M, Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith destacó la división en la jurisprudencia de apelación y decidió seguir la línea de autoridad previa ejemplificada en Urness v. Minto. Rechazó expresamente los criterios iniciales de Re T.

La jueza dejó asentado en su sentencia que habría habido un intento de impugnar la sentencia de la Inner House of the Court of Session en W. v. W. ante la Cámara de los Lores pero que el caso se había resuelto en forma amigable.

Más recientemente, se ha seguido un enfoque más estricto en cuanto a las objeciones, ver: C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]; ratificado en instancia de apelación: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996].

Suiza
El máximo tribunal suizo ha resaltado la importancia de que los menores sean capaces de distinguir entre las cuestiones vinculadas a la custodia y las cuestiones vinculadas a la restitución. Véanse:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 894].

La mera preferencia por la vida en el Estado de refugio, incluso motivada, no satisfará los términos del artículo 13(2):

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986].

Para comentarios académicos generales, véase: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia, 2008).

Influencia de los padres sobre las opiniones de los menores

Al aplicar el artículo 13(2), los tribunales han reconocido que es fundamental determinar si las objeciones del menor en cuestión se han visto influenciadas por el sustractor.

En distintos Estados contratantes, los tribunales han desestimado alegaciones según lo contemplado en el artículo 13(2) en casos en los que es evidente que el menor no expresa opiniones que se ha formado individualmente. Véanse en particular:

Australia
Director General of the Department of Community Services v. N., 19 August 1994, transcript, Family Court of Australia (Sydney) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 231];

Canadá
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 754];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 87].

El Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la importancia de las objeciones debía ser mínima o nula si el menor había sido influenciado por el sustractor o por alguna otra persona, no obstante ello no era tema de debate en dicho caso.

Finlandia
Court of Appeal of Helsinki: No. 2933 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 863];

Francia
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947].

El Tribunal de Apelaciones de Burdeos limitó la importancia que había que conferirle a las objeciones de los menores dado que, antes de la entrevista, no habían tenido contacto con el padre solicitante y habían compartido un largo período con el padre sustractor. Asimismo, las autoridades del Estado de la residencia habitual ya habían considerado las afirmaciones de los menores.

Alemania
4 UF 223/98, Oberlandesgericht Düsseldorf, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 820];

Hungría
Mezei v. Bíró 23.P.500023/98/5. (27. 03. 1998, Central District Court of Budapest; First Instance); 50.Pkf.23.732/1998/2. 16. 06. 1998., (Capital Court as Appellate Court) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HU 329];

Israel
Appl. App. Dist. Ct. 672/06, Supreme Court 15 October 2006 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 885];

Reino Unido - Escocia
A.Q. v. J.Q., 12 December 2001, transcript, Outer House of the Court of Session (Scotland) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 415];

España
Auto Audiencia Provincial Nº 133/2006 Pontevedra (Sección 1ª), Recurso de apelación Nº 473/2006 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ES 887];

Restitución de Menores 534/1997 AA [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ES 908].

Suiza
El tribunal de maxima instancia de Suiza sostuvo que las opiniones del menor no pueden ser nunca completamente independientes. Por lo tanto, debe distinguirse entre las objeciones que han sido manipuladas y aquellas que, si bien no completamente autónomas, ameritan ser tenidas en cuenta. Véase:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 795];

Estados Unidos de América
Robinson v. Robinson, 983 F. Supp. 1339 (D. Colo. 1997) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 128].

En este caso, el Tribunal de Distrito sostuvo que sería poco realista esperar que un buen padre no influyera en la preferencia de un menor en cierta medida. Por lo tanto, lo que debía determinarse era si dicha influencia resultaba indebida.

En dos casos, se sostuvo que las pruebas de influencia por parte de los padres no debían aceptarse como motivo para no determinar las opiniones de un menor que si no fuera por ello sería escuchado. Véase:

Alemania
2 BvR 1206/98, Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal Constitutional Court), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233];

Nueva Zelanda
Winters v. Cowen [2002] NZFLR 927 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 473].

Del mismo modo, la influencia de los padres puede no afectar sustancialmente las opiniones del menor. Véase:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901].

El Tribunal de Apelaciones no desestimó la proposición de que las opiniones del menor podían verse influenciadas o afectadas por estar inmerso en un ambiente de hostilidad hacia el padre solicitante, pero no estaba dispuesto a otorgarle demasiado peso a dichas proposiciones.

En un caso de Israel, el tribunal determinó que la madre le había lavado el cerebro al menor y sostuvo que, por ende, debía conferirle poca importancia a sus opiniones. Sin embargo, el Tribunal también sostuvo que no podía ignorarse la naturaleza extrema de las reacciones del menor a la restitución propuesta, que incluían la amenaza de suicidio. El tribunal concluyó que, de ser restituido, el menor se vería expuesto a un grave riesgo de daño. Véase:

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 834].

Representación separada

Existe falta de uniformidad en las jurisdicciones de habla inglesa con respecto a la representación separada de los menores.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Una temprana sentencia de apelación estableció que congruentemente con la naturaleza sumaria de los procedimientos del Convenio, la representación separada solo debería permitirse en circunstancias excepcionales.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 56].

Confirmado en:

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 881];

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 905].

El estándar de las circunstancias excepcionales ha sido establecido en varios casos. Véanse:

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 57];

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 180];

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 168];

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 579];

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 829];

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 964].

En Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 881], Lord Justice Thorpe sugirió que las exigencias se habían vuelto más estrictas con el Reglamento Bruselas II bis en lo que respecta a solicitudes de calidad de parte.

Esta sugerencia fue refutada por la Baronesa Hale en:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880]. Sin apartarse del criterio de las circunstancias excepcionales, señaló la necesidad, a la luz del nuevo régimen de sustracción de menores de la Comunidad, de volver a sopesar el modo en que las opiniones de los menores sustraídos habrían de determinarse. En particular, advirtió la necesidad de buscar las opiniones al comienzo del proceso a fin de evitar demoras.

En Re F (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 905], Lord Justice Thorpe reconoció que las exigencias no se habían vuelto más estrictas en lo que respecta a las solicitudes de calidad de parte. Rechazó la sugerencia de que la Cámara de los Lores, en Re D., hubiera bajado las exigencias.

Sin embargo, en Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937], la Baronesa Hale intervino una vez más en el debate y afirmó que un juez de instrucción debería evaluar si la representación separada aportaría lo suficiente a la comprensión del Tribunal para justificar la intrusión, la demora y los gastos ocasionados. Esto sugeriría un criterio más flexible; sin embargo, agregó asimismo que no debería darse a los menores una impresión exagerada de la relevancia e importancia de sus opiniones y, en general, no se les otorgaría la calidad de parte.

Australia
La máxima instancia de Australia intentó apartarse del criterio de las circunstancias excepcionales en De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

No obstante, el criterio fue restablecido por el legislador en la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000). Véase: Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975), art. 68L.

Véase:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [Referencia INCADAT : HC/E/AU 1106].

Francia
Los menores escuchados en virtud del art. 13(2) pueden contar con la asistencia de un abogado (art. 338-5 NCPC y art. 388-1 Code Civil - el último artículo aclara, sin embargo, que a los menores que contaran con dicha asistencia no se les confiere la calidad de parte en el proceso). Véase:

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 853].

En Escocia y Nueva Zelanda, ha habido mucha mayor voluntad en el sentido de permitir la representación separada de los menores. Véanse, por ejemplo:

Reino Unido - Escocia
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962];

M. Petitioner 2005 SLT 2 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 508];

Nueva Zelanda
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 532].

Reino Unido: jurisprudencia de Inglaterra y Gales

El Tribunal de Apelaciones inglés ha adoptado un enfoque muy estricto respecto del artículo 13(1)(b) y, en efecto, la excepción se admite en contadas oportunidades. Los siguientes casos constituyen ejemplos en los que se estimó configurada la excepción:

Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 8];

Re M. (Abduction: Psychological Harm) [1997] 2 FLR 690, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 86];

Re M. (Abduction: Leave to Appeal) [1999] 2 FLR 550, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 263];

Re D. (Article 13B: Non-return) [2006] EWCA Civ 146, [2006] 2 FLR 305, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 818];

Klentzeris v. Klentzeris [2007] EWCA Civ 533, [2007] 2 FLR 996 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 931].