CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Reshut ir'ur ezrachi (leave for civil appeal) 7994/98 Dagan v Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254

INCADAT reference

HC/E/IL 807

Court

Country

ISRAEL

Name

Supreme Court

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Justices A. Barak (president), T. Strasberg-Cohen and D. Beynish

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

ISRAEL

Decision

Date

14 June 1999

Status

Final

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3 | Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a) | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

Order

Appeal allowed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(a) 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(a)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
C.A. 1372/95 Stegman v. Bork 49(2) P.D. 431; C.A. 7206/93 Gabai v. Gabai 51 P.D. (2) 241; Civil Appeal 473/93 Leibovitz v. Leibovitz 47(3) P.D. 63.
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Habitual Residence
Habitual Residence

Exceptions to Return

Acquiescence
Acquiescence

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The application related to a very young child who was born and lived in the United States with his married Israeli parents. The nature of the parents' stay in the United States was the subject of dispute. It was the wife's case that the intention was to stay for a fixed period of two years, the husband however denied this.

At the end of the two year period the father refused to return to Israel but allowed the mother to travel there with the child for a one month holiday. The mother did not return as planned at the end of December 1996 and indicated to the father that she and the child would remain in Israel.

In the subsequent three months the parents entered into telephone negotiations about the ending of their marriage which the mother taped. At the end of March 1997 the father applied for custody in the United States and in April he submitted a return application with the Israeli Family Court. On 8 September 1997 the Israeli Family Court ordered return of the child.

The mother appealed to the District Court. Her appeal was allowed by a majority on the basis that the taped conversations showed the father had acquiesced in the wrongful retention. In particular, it was noted that the father had only requested the immediate return of the child when the negotiations had failed. The father applied for and was granted leave to appeal to the Supreme Court.

Ruling

Appeal allowed and return ordered; acquiescence had not been proved to the standard required under the Convention.

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3

The Court did not consider the issue of habitual residence. Although different theories had been applied by the District Court judges - factual independent approach and parental intention approach – there had been agreement that the child was habitually resident in the United States since the mother had not suceeded in proving that the stay in the USA was for a fixed period of time.

Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a)

The Court held that acquiescence would be found where it could be inferred from the conduct of the left-behind parent that he had waived his right to the immediate return of the child, namely that he had accepted the change in the status quo which had occurred. Thus acquiescence was based on the subjective will of the left-behind parent as expressed in his external, objective conduct. In order for acquiesence to be completed it was necessary that it be "absorbed" by the abducting parent who must believe that the left-behind parent had waived his right to the immediate return of the child. Failure to apply immediately to the Court for immediate return did not necessarily imply acquiesence where the left-behind parent was trying to achieve this end through other means, such as negotiation. It was stated that parties should be encouraged to reach agreed solutions and that the courts should be slow to interpret reasonable negotiations as amounting to acquiescence. Furthermore the Court held that the agreement of the left-behind parent to the making of arrangements for the child in the country of refuge, such as registration at school and provision of health insurance, was usually evidence of concern for the child rather than acceptance of a change in the status quo. The claim that the father had not had any conctact with his son or shown an interest in him since he was in Israel was not relevant to the claim of acquiesence, but would be relevant in the custody proceedings which would take place in the USA. The Court ruled that the mother had not succeeded in meeting the burden of proof required to prove acqiuesence. It added that reliance should not be placed on excerpts from conversations, but the overall picture should be considered. This showed that whilst the father was not vocieferous in demanding the return of his son, he had not acquiesced in the retention.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The mother argued that there was a very high chance that the court seized of custody proceedings in the United States would allow her to relocate to Israel and that therefore a return order would amount to an unnecessary disruption for the child. This was rejected by the Court which held such an argument would undermine the objectives of the Hague Convention.

INCADAT comment

The mother did return with the child to the United States, where she then obtained custody and permission to relocate with the child to Israel. Recently Israeli courts have been more willing to find that there has been acquiescence, see, for example: Family Appeal 575/04 Y.M. v. A.M.; Family Application 046252/04 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 806] and Family Appeal 592/04 R.K v. Ch. K.

Habitual Residence

The interpretation of the central concept of habitual residence (Preamble, Art. 3, Art. 4) has proved increasingly problematic in recent years with divergent interpretations emerging in different jurisdictions. There is a lack of uniformity as to whether in determining habitual residence the emphasis should be exclusively on the child, with regard paid to the intentions of the child's care givers, or primarily on the intentions of the care givers. At least partly as a result, habitual residence may appear a very flexible connecting factor in some Contracting States yet much more rigid and reflective of long term residence in others.

Any assessment of the interpretation of habitual residence is further complicated by the fact that cases focusing on the concept may concern very different factual situations. For example habitual residence may arise for consideration following a permanent relocation, or a more tentative move, albeit one which is open-ended or potentially open-ended, or indeed the move may be for a clearly defined period of time.

General Trends:

United States Federal Appellate case law may be taken as an example of the full range of interpretations which exist with regard to habitual residence.

Child Centred Focus

The United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit has advocated strongly for a child centred approach in the determination of habitual residence:

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 935].

See also:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 221].

Combined Child's Connection / Parental Intention Focus

The United States Courts of Appeals for the 3rd and 8th Circuits, have espoused a child centred approach but with reference equally paid to the parents' present shared intentions.

The key judgment is that of Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 83].

See also:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 879].

In the latter case a distinction was drawn between the situation of very young children, where particular weight was placed on parental intention(see for example: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 808]) and that of older children where the impact of parental intention was more limited.

Parental Intention Focus

The judgment of the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 301] has been highly influential in providing that there should ordinarily be a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence before a child can acquire a new one.

This interpretation has been endorsed and built upon in other Federal appellate decisions so that where there was not a shared intention on the part of the parents as to the purpose of the move this led to an existing habitual residence being retained, even though the child had been away from that jurisdiction for an extended period of time. See for example:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 777]: United States habitual residence retained after 8 months of an intended 4 year stay in Germany;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 780]: United States habitual residence retained during 32 month stay in Mexico;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 482]: United States habitual residence retained during 27 month stay in Greece.

The Mozes approach has also been approved of by the Federal Court of Appeals for the 2nd and 7th Circuits:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 878].

It should be noted that within the Mozes approach the 9th Circuit did acknowledge that given enough time and positive experience, a child's life could become so firmly embedded in the new country as to make it habitually resident there notwithstanding lingering parental intentions to the contrary.

Other Jurisdictions

There are variations of approach in other jurisdictions:

Austria
The Supreme Court of Austria has ruled that a period of residence of more than six months in a State will ordinarily be characterized as habitual residence, and even if it takes place against the will of the custodian of the child (since it concerns a factual determination of the centre of life).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
In the Province of Quebec, a child centred focus is adopted:

In Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 651], the Cour d'appel de Montréal held that the determination of the habitual residence of a child was a purely factual issue to be decided in the light of the circumstances of the case with regard to the reality of the child's life, rather than that of his parents. The actual period of residence must have endured for a continuous and not insignificant period of time; the child must have a real and active link to the place, but there is no minimum period of residence which is specified.

Germany
A child centred, factual approach is also evident in German case law:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 944].

This has led to the Federal Constitutional Court accepting that a habitual residence may be acquired notwithstanding the child having been wrongfully removed to the new State of residence:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 233].

The Constitutional Court upheld the finding of the Higher Regional Court that the children had acquired a habitual residence in France, notwithstanding the nature of their removal there. This was because habitual residence was a factual concept and during their nine months there, the children had become integrated into the local environment.

Israel
Alternative approaches have been adopted when determining the habitual residence of children. On occasion, strong emphasis has been placed on parental intentions. See:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 939].

However, reference has been made to a more child centred approach in other cases. See:

decision of the Supreme Court in C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 922].

New Zealand
In contrast to the Mozes approach the requirement of a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence was specifically rejected by a majority of the New Zealand Court of Appeal. See

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 816].

Switzerland
A child centred, factual approach is evident in Swiss case law:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841].

United Kingdom
The standard approach is to consider the settled intention of the child's carers in conjunction with the factual reality of the child's life.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 2]. For academic commentary on the different models of interpretation given to habitual residence. See:

R. Schuz, "Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice", Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13, No. 1, 2001, p. 1;

R. Schuz, "Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context", Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Acquiescence

There has been general acceptance that where the exception of acquiescence is concerned regard must be paid in the first instance to the subjective intentions of the left behind parent, see:

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 213];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 345];

Austria
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 981].

Considering the issue for the first time, Austria's supreme court held that acquiescence in a temporary state of affairs would not suffice for the purposes of Article 13(1) a), rather there had to be acquiescence in a durable change in habitual residence.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 545];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 851];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

In this case the House of Lords affirmed that acquiescence was not to be found in passing remarks or letters written by a parent who has recently suffered the trauma of the removal of his children.

Ireland
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

Israel
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 807];

New Zealand
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 533];

United Kingdom - Scotland
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 500];

South Africa
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 499];

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841].

In keeping with this approach there has also been a reluctance to find acquiescence where the applicant parent has sought initially to secure the voluntary return of the child or a reconciliation with the abducting parent, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [INCADAT cite:  HC/E/UKe 179];

Ireland
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

United States of America
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 84];

In the Australian case Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 290] negotiation over the course of 12 months was taken to amount to acquiescence but, notably, in the court's exercise of its discretion it decided to make a return order.

Faits

La demande concernait un très jeune enfant qui était né et avait vécu aux Etats-Unis avec ses parents israéliens, lesquels étaient mariés. La nature du séjour des parents aux Etats-Unis était controversée. Selon la mère, il était prévu qu'ils n'y restent que 2 ans, mais le père contestait cet aspect.

A l'issue de leur séjour de 2 ans, le père refusa de rentrer en Israël, mais autorisa la mère à s'y rendre pour un mois de vacances avec l'enfant. Fin décembre 1996, la mère aurait dû rentrer aux Etats-Unis, mais elle informa le père de son intention de rester en Israël.

Dans les trois mois qui s'ensuivirent, les parents discutèrent de l'issue de leur mariage au téléphone, la mère enregistrant toutes leurs conversations. Fin mars 1997 le père demanda la garde de l'enfant aux Etats-Unis et saisit un tribunal aux affaires familiales israélien d'une demande de retour. Le 8 septembre 1997, le tribunal ordonna le retour de l'enfant. La mère interjeta appel.

Son recours fut accueilli par la majorité des juges au motif que les conversations téléphoniques montraient que le père avait acquiescé au non-retour. En particulier, la cour d'appel souligna que le père n'avait demandé le retour qu'une fois que les négociations sur l'issue du mariage avaient échoué. La père forma un recours devant la cour suprême.

Dispositif

Recours accueilli et retour ordonné ; l'acquiescement au sens de la Convention n'avait pas été établi.

Motifs

Résidence habituelle - art. 3

La cour ne se posa pas la question de la résidence habituelle : bien que des interprétations différentes avaient été suivies par les juges d'appel (théorie de l'intention parentale ou approche factuelle indépendante), il était admis que l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle aux Etats-Unis dans la mesure où la mère n'était pas parvenue à prouver que le séjour aux Etats-Unis était d'une durée limitée.

Acquiescement - art. 13(1)(a)

La cour estima que l'acquiescement pouvait être déduit lorsque du comportement du parent victime on pouvait inférer qu'il avait renoncé à son droit à demander le retour immédiat de l'enfant et accepté le changement imposé du fait de l'enlèvement. L'acquiescement était fondé sur la volonté subjective du parent victime, telle qu'elle était exprimée par son comportement externe, objectif. Pour que l'acquiescement soit complet, il convenait qu'il soit compris par le parent rapteur, lequel devait être convaincu que le parent victime renonçait à son droit à demander le retour immédiat de l'enfant. Le fait que la demande de retour n'avait pas été déposée immédiatement n'impliquait pas nécessairement un acquiescement lorsque le parent victime cherchait une solution par d'autres moyens et notamment la négociation. La cour rappela qu'il importait que les parties soient encouragées à trouver des solutions amiables et qu'en conséquence les tribunaux ne devaient pas déduire l'acquiescement de négociations raisonnables. En outre, la cour estima que le fait que le parent victime accepte que des mesures soient prises pour l'enfant dans le pays de refuge (assurance santé, inscription à l'école etc) montrait l'intérêt du parent pour l'enfant plutôt que son acceptation de la situation nouvellement créée. L'allégation selon laquelle le père n'avait pas eu de contact avec son fils ni montré d'intérêt pou lui depuis qu'il vivait en Israël était sans pertinence au regard de l'acquiescement mais pourrait être considérée par la cour chargée de la question de la garde aux Etats-Unis. La cour décida que la mère n'était pas parvenue à prouver l'acquiescement. Elle ajouta qu'il convenait de ne pas attacher trop d'importance à des morceaux de conversation tirés de leur contexte, mais qu'il importait au contraire de chercher à obtenir une vue d'ensemble de la situation. En l'espèce, bien que le père ne se soit pas montré véhément dans sa volonté d'obtenir le retour de l'enfant, il n'avait pas acquiescé au non-retour.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

Selon la mère, il était fort probable que le juge américain saisi de la question de la garde l'autoriserait à s'installer en Israël avec l'enfant, de sorte que le retour imposait une perturbation inutile de la vie de l'enfant. La cour rejeta cet argument, estimant qu'il était contraire à l'objectif de la Convention.

Commentaire INCADAT

La mère ramena l'enfant aux Etats-Unis, où elle se vit accorder la garde de celui-ci et autoriser à s'installer en Israël. Des décisions israéliennes récentes se sont montrées plus libérales quant à l'acquiescement ; voy. par exemple : Family Appeal 575/04 Y.M. v. A.M.; Family Application 046252/04 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 806] et Family Appeal 592/04 R.K v. Ch. K.

Résidence habituelle

L'interprétation de la notion centrale de résidence habituelle (préambule, art. 3 et 4) s'est révélée particulièrement problématique ces dernières années, des divergences apparaissant dans divers États contractants. Une approche uniforme fait défaut quant à la question de savoir ce qui doit être au cœur de l'analyse : l'enfant seul, l'enfant ainsi que l'intention des personnes disposant de sa garde, ou simplement l'intention de ces personnes. En conséquence notamment de cette différence d'approche, la notion de résidence peut apparaître comme un élément de rattachement très flexible dans certains États contractants ou un facteur de rattachement plus rigide et représentatif d'une résidence à long terme dans d'autres.

L'analyse du concept de résidence habituelle est par ailleurs compliquée par le fait que les décisions concernent des situations factuelles très diverses. La question de la résidence habituelle peut se poser à l'occasion d'un déménagement permanent à l'étranger, d'un déménagement consistant en un test d'une durée illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée ou simplement d'un séjour à l'étranger de durée déterminée.

Tendances générales:

La jurisprudence des cours d'appel fédérales américaines illustre la grande variété d'interprétations données au concept de résidence habituelle.
Approche centrée sur l'enfant

La cour d'appel fédérale des États-Unis d'Amérique du 6e ressort s'est prononcée fermement en faveur d'une approche centrée sur l'enfant seul :

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 935]

Voir aussi :

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 221].

Approche combinée des liens de l'enfant et de l'intention parentale

Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis d'Amérique des 3e et 8e ressorts ont privilégié une méthode où les liens de l'enfant avec le pays ont été lus à la lumière de l'intention parentale conjointe.
Le jugement de référence est le suivant : Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 83].

Voir aussi :

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 530] ;

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Dans cette dernière espèce, une distinction a été pratiquée entre la situation d'enfants très jeunes (où une importance plus grande est attachée à l'intention des parents - voir par exemple : Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 808]) et celle d'enfants plus âgés pour lesquels l'intention parentale joue un rôle plus limité.

Approche centrée sur l'intention parentale

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel fédérale du 9e ressort a rendu une décision dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301], qui s'est révélée très influente en exigeant la présence d'une intention ferme d'abandonner une résidence préexistante pour qu'un enfant puisse acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle.

Cette interprétation a été reprise et précisée par d'autres décisions rendues en appel par des juridictions fédérales de sorte qu'en l'absence d'intention commune des parents en cas de départ pour l'étranger, la résidence habituelle a été maintenue dans le pays d'origine, alors même que l'enfant a passé une période longue à l'étranger.  Voir par exemple :

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 777] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour prévu de 4 ans en Allemagne ;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 780] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 32 mois au Mexique ;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT : HC/E/USf 482] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 27 mois en Grèce.

La décision rendue dans l'affaire Mozes a également été approuvée par les cours fédérales d'appel du 2e et du 7e ressort :

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 776] ;

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 878] ;

Il convient de noter que dans l'affaire Mozes, la Cour a reconnu que si suffisamment de temps s'est écoulé et que l'enfant a vécu une expérience positive, la vie de l'enfant peut être si fermement attachée à son nouveau milieu qu'une nouvelle résidence habituelle doit pouvoir y être acquise nonobstant l'intention parentale contraire.

Autres États contractants

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position a évolué :

Autriche
La Cour suprême d'Autriche a décidé qu'une résidence de plus de six mois dans un État sera généralement caractérisée de résidence habituelle, quand bien même elle aurait lieu contre la volonté du gardien de l'enfant (puisqu'il s'agit d'une détermination factuelle du centre de vie).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
Au Québec, au contraire, l'approche est centrée sur l'enfant :
Dans Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 651], la Cour d'appel de Montréal a décidé que la résidence habituelle d'un enfant est simplement une question de fait qui doit s'apprécier à la lumière de toutes les circonstances particulières de l'espèce en fonction de la réalité vécue par l'enfant en question, et non celle de ses parents. Le séjour doit être d'une durée non négligeable (nécessaire au développement de liens par l'enfant et à son intégration dans son nouveau milieu) et continue, aussi l'enfant doit-il avoir un lien réel et actif avec sa résidence; cependant, aucune durée minimale ne peut être formulée.

Allemagne
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort également de la jurisprudence allemande :

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale a ainsi admis qu'une résidence habituelle puisse être acquise bien que l'enfant ait été illicitement déplacé dans le nouvel État de résidence :

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

La Cour constitutionnelle a confirmé l'analyse de la Cour régionale d'appel selon laquelle les enfants avaient acquis leur résidence habituelle en France malgré la nature de leur déplacement là-bas. La Cour a en effet considéré  que la résidence habituelle était un concept factuel, et les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur milieu local pendant les neuf mois qu'ils y avaient vécu.

Israël
Des approches alternatives ont été adoptées lors de la détermination de la résidence habituelle. Il est arrivé qu'un poids important ait été accordé à l'intention parentale. Voir :

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865] ;

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

Cependant, il a parfois été fait référence à une approche plus centrée sur l'enfant. Voir :

décision de la Cour suprême dans C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241 ;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 922].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Contrairement à l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Mozes, la cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Zélande a expressément rejeté l'idée que pour acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, il convient d'avoir l'intention ferme de renoncer à la résidence habituelle précédente. Voir :

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suisse
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort de la jurisprudence suisse :

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Royaume-Uni
L'approche standard est de considérer conjointement la ferme intention des personnes ayant la charge de l'enfant et la réalité vécue par l'enfant.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Pour un commentaire doctrinal des différentes approches du concept de résidence habituelle dans les pays de common law. Voir :

R. Schuz, « Habitual Residence of  Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice », Child and Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 13, No1, 2001, p.1 ;

R. Schuz, « Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context » Journal of Transnational Law and Policy, Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Acquiescement

On constate que la plupart des tribunaux considèrent que l'acquiescement se caractérise en premier lieu à partir de l'intention subjective du parent victime :

Australie
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @213@];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @345@];

Autriche
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT @981@].

Dans cette affaire la Cour suprême autrichienne, qui prenait position pour la première fois sur l'interprétation de la notion d'acquiescement, souligna que l'acquiescement à état de fait provisoire ne suffisait pas à faire jouer l'exception et que seul l'acquiescement à un changement durable de la résidence habituelle donnait lieu à une exception au retour au sens de l'article 13(1) a).

Belgique
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE @545@];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 851];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

En l'espèce la Chambre des Lords britannique décida que l'acquiescement ne pouvait se déduire de remarques passagères et de lettres écrites par un parent qui avait récemment subi le traumatisme de voir ses enfants lui être enlevés par l'autre parent. 

Irlande
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

Israël
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL @807@] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @533@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @500@];

Afrique du Sud
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @499@];

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@].

De la même manière, on remarque une réticence des juges à constater un acquiescement lorsque le parent avait essayé d'abord de parvenir à un retour volontaire de l'enfant ou à une réconciliation. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @179@ ];

Irlande
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @84@];

Dans l'affaire australienne Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @290@] des négociations d'une durée de 12 mois avaient été considérées comme établissant un acquiescement, mais la cour décida, dans le cadre de son pouvoir souverain d'appréciation, de ne pas ordonner le retour.

Hechos

La solicitud se relacionaba con un menor muy pequeño que nació y vivió en los Estados Unidos con sus padres israelíes que estaban casados. La naturaleza de la estadía de los padres en los Estados Unidos era el objeto de la controversia. La esposa planteó que la intención era la de quedarse por un plazo fijo de dos años, el esposo, sin embargo, lo negó.

Al final del plazo de dos años, el padre se negó a regresar a Israel pero le permitió a la madre viajar allí con el menor durante un mes de vacaciones. La madre no regresó según lo planeado al final de diciembre de 1996, y le dijo al padre que ella y el menor se quedarían en Israel.

En los tres meses siguientes, los padres celebraron negociaciones por teléfono sobre la finalización de su matrimonio que la madre grabó en una cinta. A fines de marzo de 1997, el padre solicitó la custodia en los Estados Unidos y en abril presentó una solicitud de restitución ante el Family Court (Tribunal de Familia) de Israel. El 8 de septiembre de 1997, el Family Court (Tribunal de Familia) de Israel ordenó la restitución del menor. La madre apeló ante el District Court (Tribunal de Distrito).

La mayoría permitió su apelación sobre la base de que las conversaciones grabadas demostraban que el padre había aceptado posteriormente la retención ilícita. En particular, se destacó que el padre sólo había solicitado la restitución inmediata del menor cuando fracasaron las negociaciones. El padre solicitó y se le otorgó un permiso para apelar ante la Supreme Court (Corte Suprema).

Fallo

Apelación permitida y restitución ordenada; no se había probado la aceptación posterior en la medida exigida en virtud del Convenio.

Fundamentos

Residencia habitual - art. 3

El Tribunal no consideró la cuestión de residencia habitual. Si bien los jueces del District Court (Tribunal de Distrito) habían aplicado diferentes teorías – el enfoque de hechos independientes y el enfoque de la intención de los padres – hubo acuerdo de que el menor tenía su residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos puesto que la madre no había logrado probar que la estadía en dicho país era por un período de tiempo fijo.

Aceptación posterior - art. 13(1)(a)

El tribunal sostuvo que existiría aceptación posterior en los casos en que se pudiera inferir de la conducta del progenitor perjudicado que había renunciado a su derecho a la restitución inmediata del menor, es decir, que había aceptado el cambio del status quo que había tenido lugar. Por ello, la aceptación posterior se basaba en la voluntad subjetiva del progenitor perjudicado según se expresó en su conducta externa y objetiva. Para que se complete la aceptación posterior era necesario que fuera "absorbida" por el progenitor sustractor que debe creer que el progenitor perjudicado había renunciado a su derecho a la restitución inmediata del menor. El hecho de no solicitar de inmediato ante el Tribunal la restitución inmediata no implicaba necesariamente la aceptación posterior en el caso de que un progenitor perjudicado estuviera intentando lograr este objetivo a través de otros medios, tales como la negociación. Se estableció que se debería alentar a las partes a lograr soluciones de mutuo acuerdo y que los tribunales no deberían apresurarse a interpretar que las negociaciones razonables equivalen a una aceptación posterior. Asimismo, el Tribunal sostuvo que el consentimiento del progenitor perjudicado a efectuar los arreglos para el menor en el país de refugio, tal como la inscripción en un colegio y la provisión de un seguro de salud, usualmente era evidencia de la preocupación por el menor y no una aceptación de un cambio en el status quo. El reclamo de que el padre no había tenido contacto con su hijo ni demostrado interés en él desde que estaba en Israel no era relevante para el planteo de aceptación posterior, pero sería relevante en el proceso de custodia que se llevaría a cabo en los Estados Unidos. El Tribunal falló que la madre no había logrado satisfacer las pruebas exigidas para demostrar la existencia de una aceptación posterior. Agregó que no se debía amparar en los extractos de conversaciones, sino que se debía considerar el panorama en general. Esto demostraba que si bien el padre no fue clamoroso para reclamar la restitución de su hijo, no había aceptado posteriormente su retención.

Grave riesgo - art. 13(1)(b)

La madre argumentó que existía una alta probabilidad de que el tribunal a cargo del proceso de custodia en los Estados Unidos le permitiera reubicarse en Israel y que por lo tanto una orden de restitución equivaldría a un desarraigo innecesario para el menor. Esto fue rechazado por el Tribunal que sostuvo que dicho argumento socavaría los objetivos del Convenio de La Haya.

Comentario INCADAT

La madre regresó con el menor a los Estados Unidos, donde obtuvo la custodia y el permiso para reubicarse con el menor en Israel. Recientemente, los tribunales israelíes han estado más predispuestos a determinar que hubo aceptación posterior, véase, por ejemplo: Family Appeal 575/04 Y.M. v. A.M.; Family Application 046252/04 Ploni v. Almonit [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 806] y Family Appeal 592/04 R.K v. Ch. K.

Residencia habitual

La interpretación del concepto central de residencia habitual (Preámbulo, art. 3, art. 4) ha demostrado ser cada vez más problemática en años recientes con interpretaciones divergentes que surgen de distintos Estados contratantes. No hay uniformidad respecto de si al momento de determinar la residencia habitual el énfasis debe estar sobre el niño exclusivamente, prestando atención a las intenciones de las personas a cargo del cuidado del menor, o si debe estar primordialmente en las intenciones de las personas a cargo del cuidado del menor. Al menos en parte como resultado, la residencia habitual puede parecer constituir un factor de conexión muy flexible en algunos Estados contratantes y mucho más rígido y reflejo de la residencia a largo plazo en otros.

La valoración de la interpretación de residencia habitual se torna aún más complicada por el hecho de que los casos que se concentran en el concepto pueden involucrar situaciones fácticas muy diversas. A modo de ejemplo, la residencia habitual puede tener que considerarse como consecuencia de una mudanza permanente, o una mudanza más tentativa, aunque tenga una duración indefinida o potencialmente indefinida, o la mudanza pueda ser, de hecho, por un plazo de tiempo definido.

Tendencias generales:

La jurisprudencia de los tribunales federales de apelación de los Estados Unidos de América puede tomarse como ejemplo de la amplia gama de interpretaciones existentes en lo que respecta a la residencia habitual.

Enfoque centrado en el menor

El Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América del 6º Circuito ha apoyado firmemente el enfoque centrado en el menor en la determinación de la residencia habitual.

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F. 2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/Ee/USF 142];

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 935].

Veáse también:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 221].

Enfoque combinado: conexión del menor / intención de los padres

Los Tribunales Federales de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América de los 3º y 8º  Circuitos han adoptado un enfoque centrado en el menor pero que igualmente tiene en cuenta las intenciones compartidas de los padres.

El fallo clave es el del caso: Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 83].

Veánse también:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003), [Referencai INCADAT: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 879].

En este último asunto se estableció una distinción entre las situaciones que involucran a niños muy pequeños, en las cuales se atribuye especial importancia a las intenciones de los padres (véase por ejemplo: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 808]) y aquellas que involucran a niños más mayores, donde el impacto de las intenciones de los padres ya es más limitado.

Enfoque centrado en la intención de los padres

El fallo del Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América del 9º Circuito en Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 301] ha sido altamente influyente al disponer que, por lo general, debería haber una intención establecida de abandonar una residencia habitual antes de que un menor pueda adquirir una nueva.

Esta interpretación ha sido adoptada y desarrollada en otras sentencias de tribunales federales de apelación, de modo tal que la ausencia de intención compartida de los padres respecto del objeto de la mudanza derivó en la conservación de la residencia habitual vigente, aunque el menor hubiera estado fuera de dicho Estado durante un período de tiempo extenso. Véanse por ejemplo:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009, 1014 (9th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 777]: Conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos luego de 8 meses de una estadía intencional de cuatro años en Alemania;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247, 1253 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 780]: Conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos durante una estadía de 32 meses en México;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001), [Referencai INCADAT: HC/E/USf 482]: conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos durante una estadía de 27 meses en Grecia;

El enfoque en el asunto Mozes ha sido aprobado asimismo por el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Circuitos 2º y 7º:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124, 129-30 (2d Cir. 2005), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (7th Cir.2006), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 878].

Con respecto al enfoque aplicado en el asunto Mozes, cabe destacar que el 9º Circuito sí reconoció que, con tiempo suficiente y una experiencia positiva, la vida de un menor podría integrarse tan firmemente en el nuevo país de manera de pasar a tener residencia habitual allí sin perjuicio de las intenciones en contrario que pudieren tener los padres.

Otros Estados

Hay diferencias en los enfoques que adoptan otros Estados.

Austria
La Corte Suprema de Austria ha establecido que un periodo de residencia superior a seis meses en un Estado será considerado generalmente residencia habitual, aún en el caso en que sea contra la voluntad de la persona que se encarga del cuidado del niño (ya que se trata de una determinación fáctica del centro de su vida).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canadá
En la Provincia de Quebec se adopta un enfoque centrado en el menor:

En el asunto Droit de la famille 3713, N° 500-09-010031-003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 651], el Tribunal de Apelaciones de Montreal sostuvo que la determinación de la residencia habitual de un menor es una cuestión puramente fáctica que debe resolverse a la luz de las circunstancias del caso, teniendo en cuenta la realidad de la vida del menor, más que a la de sus padres. El plazo de residencia efectiva debe ser por un período de tiempo significativo e ininterrumpido y el menor debe tener un vínculo real y activo con el lugar. Sin embargo, no se establece un período de residencia mínimo.

Alemania
En la jurisprudencia alemana se evidencia asimismo un enfoque fáctico centrado en la vida del menor:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

Esto condujo a que el Tribunal Federal Constitucional aceptara que la residencia habitual se puede adquirir sin perjuicio de que el niño haya sido trasladado de forma ilícita al nuevo Estado de residencia:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

El Tribunal Constitucional confirmó la decisión del Tribunal Regional de Apelaciones por la que se estableció que los niños habían adquirido residencia habitual en Francia, sin perjuicio de la naturaleza de su traslado a ese lugar. La fundamentación consistió en que la residencia habitual es un concepto fáctico y que durante los nueve meses que estuvieron allí, los niños se integraron al entorno local.

Israel
En este país se adoptaron enfoques alternativos para determinar la residencia habitual del niño. Algunas veces se ha puesto bastante atención en las intenciones de los padres. Véanse:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

No obstante, en otros casos se ha hecho referencia a un enfoque más centrado en el menor. Véase:

decisión de la Corte Suprema en C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 922].

Nueva Zelanda
Asimismo, cabe destacar que, a diferencia del enfoque adoptado en Mozes, la mayoría de los miembros del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Nueva Zelanda rechazó expresamente la idea de que para adquirir una nueva residencia habitual se deba tener una intención establecida de abandonar la residencia habitual vigente. Véase:

S.K. v K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suiza
En la jurisprudencia suiza se puede ver un enfoque fáctico centrado en la vida del menor:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Reino Unido
El enfoque estándar consiste en considerar la intención establecida de las personas que se encargan del cuidado del menor en consonancia con la realidad fáctica de la vida de aquel.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Para una opinión doctrinaria acerca de los diferentes enfoques sobre el concepto de residencia habitual en los países del common law, véanse:

R. Schuz, Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice, Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13 1 (2001) 1.

R. Schuz, Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context, Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 101 (2001).

Aceptación posterior

Se ha aceptado en forma generalizada que en lo que respecta a la excepción de aceptación posterior, en primera instancia, debe prestarse atención a las intenciones subjetivas del padre privado del menor. Véanse:

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 213];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian, PT 1767 of 2001 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 345];

Austria
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (tribunal supremo de Austria) 1/4/2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT @981@]

Al considerar la cuestión por primera vez, el tribunal supremo de Austria resolvió que la aceptación posterior con respecto a un estado de situación temporario no sería suficiente a efectos del artículo 13(1) a), sino que, en el caso de un cambio permanente de residencia habitual, debía existir aceptación posterior.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 545];

Canadá
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 851];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 46];

En este caso, la Cámara de los Lores sostuvo que no podía deducirse que había habido aceptación posterior por comentarios pasajeros o cartas escritas por un padre que recientemente había sufrido el trauma inherente a la sustracción de sus hijos.

Irlanda
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 285];

Israel
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 807]

Nueva Zelanda
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 533];

Reino Unido - Escocia
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 500]

Sudáfrica
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 499];

Suiza
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

En concordancia con este enfoque, ha habido reticencia a pronunciarse en favor de la existencia de aceptación posterior cuando el padre solicitante ha pretendido en un principio obtener la restitución voluntaria del menor o lograr reconciliarse con el sustractor. Véanse:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 46];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [Referencia INCADAT:  HC/E/UKe 179] ;

Irlanda
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 285];

Estados Unidos de América
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 84];

En el caso australiano Townsend y Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 290], se interpretó que la negociación durante 12 meses equivalía a aceptación posterior. Sin embargo, cabe destacar que, en ejercicio de su discrecionalidad, el tribunal decidió expedir una orden de restitución.