CASE

No full text available

Case Name

D.W. & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2006] FamCA 93

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 870

Court

Country

AUSTRALIA

Name

Full Court of the Family Court of Australia at Brisbane

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Finn, Holden and May JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

28 February 2006

Status

Final

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3

Order

Appeal allowed, application dismissed

HC article(s) Considered

3

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
A. v. A. (Child Abduction) [1993] 2 FLR 225 Cooper v. Casey (1995) FLC 92-575 Department of Health and Community Services v. Casse (1995) FLC 92-629 In Re J. (a Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562 M. v. M. (Abduction: England & Scotland) [1997] 2 FLR 263 Panayotides (1997) FLC 92-733 R. v. Barnet London Borough Council ex parte Shah [1983] 2 AC 309 Re B. (Minors) (Abduction) (No 2) [1993] 1 FLR 993 Re F. (a Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548 State Central Authority v. McCall (1995) FLC 92-552.
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Habitual Residence
Habitual Residence
Relocations
Open-Ended Moves

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to a child born in May 2004 in Australia to an Australian mother and American father. The parents were not married. On 13 July 2004 the mother travelled with the child to the United States on a one-way ticket and moved into the home of the father.

On 2 October mother and child went to a women's shelter. On 4 October they returned to Australia. On 21 June 2005 a return petition was filed with the Queensland Central Authority. On 7 October the Family Court of Australia ruled that the removal had been wrongful and ordered the return of the child. The mother appealed.

Ruling

Appeal allowed and application dismissed by a majority ruling; the child was not habitually resident in the United States at the time of the removal.

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3

The trial judge had found that the mother never had the intention to live in the United States permenantly, rather that she had the intention of taking up residence with the father to see how that 'worked out'. He held that there was no reason why such an intention could not be or become a settled intention. He then ruled that when, with such an intention, the mother took up residence with the father and remained in that residence for at least two months, she, the father and the child became habitually resident in the United States. The trial judge conceded that within a relatively short period of time after arrival the mother may have become uncertain and concerned about whether the relationship was working out or would work out, but he held that this did not mean that the mother was not by then habitually resident with the child in the United States. After an extensive analysis of Australian and English case law the majority held that it would clearly be wrong to conclude that a person who had taken up residence in a particular country to see how a relationship with a resident of the country would “work out” either had a settled intention to take up long term residence in that country (which in any event the trial judge found the mother did not have) or had adopted an abode in that country for settled purposes as part of the regular order of his or her life. The mother therefore had not acquired a habitual residence in the United States and consequently there could be no shared intention on the part of the parents that the United States was to be their habitual residence. Thus the child could not be held to have been habitually resident in the United States immediately prior to his removal. In this case the majority accepted that their decision could be said to deny the child of the benefit of the Convention but they argued that the interests of children generally could well be adversely affected if courts were too willing to find that a parent of a child who had attempted a reconciliation in a foreign country with the other parent in order to try to create for the child a family consisting of both parents, was to be found, together with the child, to have become “habitually resident” in that foreign country. In a dissenting judgment Holden J. held that it was largely irrelevant how long the mother had been living in the United States and whether she was certain to remain in the United States in the long term. The trial judge had been entitled the find the mother, and thus the child, habitually resident in the United States.

INCADAT comment

Habitual Residence

The interpretation of the central concept of habitual residence (Preamble, Art. 3, Art. 4) has proved increasingly problematic in recent years with divergent interpretations emerging in different jurisdictions. There is a lack of uniformity as to whether in determining habitual residence the emphasis should be exclusively on the child, with regard paid to the intentions of the child's care givers, or primarily on the intentions of the care givers. At least partly as a result, habitual residence may appear a very flexible connecting factor in some Contracting States yet much more rigid and reflective of long term residence in others.

Any assessment of the interpretation of habitual residence is further complicated by the fact that cases focusing on the concept may concern very different factual situations. For example habitual residence may arise for consideration following a permanent relocation, or a more tentative move, albeit one which is open-ended or potentially open-ended, or indeed the move may be for a clearly defined period of time.

General Trends:

United States Federal Appellate case law may be taken as an example of the full range of interpretations which exist with regard to habitual residence.

Child Centred Focus

The United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit has advocated strongly for a child centred approach in the determination of habitual residence:

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 935].

See also:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 221].

Combined Child's Connection / Parental Intention Focus

The United States Courts of Appeals for the 3rd and 8th Circuits, have espoused a child centred approach but with reference equally paid to the parents' present shared intentions.

The key judgment is that of Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 83].

See also:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 879].

In the latter case a distinction was drawn between the situation of very young children, where particular weight was placed on parental intention(see for example: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 808]) and that of older children where the impact of parental intention was more limited.

Parental Intention Focus

The judgment of the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 301] has been highly influential in providing that there should ordinarily be a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence before a child can acquire a new one.

This interpretation has been endorsed and built upon in other Federal appellate decisions so that where there was not a shared intention on the part of the parents as to the purpose of the move this led to an existing habitual residence being retained, even though the child had been away from that jurisdiction for an extended period of time. See for example:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 777]: United States habitual residence retained after 8 months of an intended 4 year stay in Germany;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 780]: United States habitual residence retained during 32 month stay in Mexico;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 482]: United States habitual residence retained during 27 month stay in Greece.

The Mozes approach has also been approved of by the Federal Court of Appeals for the 2nd and 7th Circuits:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 878].

It should be noted that within the Mozes approach the 9th Circuit did acknowledge that given enough time and positive experience, a child's life could become so firmly embedded in the new country as to make it habitually resident there notwithstanding lingering parental intentions to the contrary.

Other Jurisdictions

There are variations of approach in other jurisdictions:

Austria
The Supreme Court of Austria has ruled that a period of residence of more than six months in a State will ordinarily be characterized as habitual residence, and even if it takes place against the will of the custodian of the child (since it concerns a factual determination of the centre of life).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
In the Province of Quebec, a child centred focus is adopted:

In Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 651], the Cour d'appel de Montréal held that the determination of the habitual residence of a child was a purely factual issue to be decided in the light of the circumstances of the case with regard to the reality of the child's life, rather than that of his parents. The actual period of residence must have endured for a continuous and not insignificant period of time; the child must have a real and active link to the place, but there is no minimum period of residence which is specified.

Germany
A child centred, factual approach is also evident in German case law:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 944].

This has led to the Federal Constitutional Court accepting that a habitual residence may be acquired notwithstanding the child having been wrongfully removed to the new State of residence:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 233].

The Constitutional Court upheld the finding of the Higher Regional Court that the children had acquired a habitual residence in France, notwithstanding the nature of their removal there. This was because habitual residence was a factual concept and during their nine months there, the children had become integrated into the local environment.

Israel
Alternative approaches have been adopted when determining the habitual residence of children. On occasion, strong emphasis has been placed on parental intentions. See:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 939].

However, reference has been made to a more child centred approach in other cases. See:

decision of the Supreme Court in C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 922].

New Zealand
In contrast to the Mozes approach the requirement of a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence was specifically rejected by a majority of the New Zealand Court of Appeal. See

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 816].

Switzerland
A child centred, factual approach is evident in Swiss case law:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841].

United Kingdom
The standard approach is to consider the settled intention of the child's carers in conjunction with the factual reality of the child's life.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 2]. For academic commentary on the different models of interpretation given to habitual residence. See:

R. Schuz, "Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice", Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13, No. 1, 2001, p. 1;

R. Schuz, "Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context", Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Relocations

Where there is clear evidence of an intention to commence a new life in another State then the existing habitual residence will be lost and a new one acquired.

In common law jurisdictions it is accepted that acquisition may be able to occur within a short period of time, see:

Canada
DeHaan v. Gracia [2004] AJ No.94 (QL), [2004] ABQD 4, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 576];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 2];

Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 40].

In civil law jurisdictions it has been held that a new habitual residence may be acquired immediately, see:

Switzerland
Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) Décision du 15 novembre 2005, 5P.367/2005 /ast, [INCADAT cite : HC/E/CH 841].

Conditional Relocations 

Where parental agreement as regards relocation is conditional on a future event, should an existing habitual residence be lost immediately upon leaving that country? 

Australia
The Full Court of the Family Court of Australia answered this question in the negative and further held that loss may not even follow from the fulfilment of the condition if the parent who aspires to relocate does not clearly commit to the relocation at that time, see:

Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 995].

However, this ruling was overturned on appeal by the High Court of Australia, which held that an existing habitual residence would be lost if the purpose had a sufficient degree of continuity to be described as settled.  There did not need to be a settled intention to take up ‘long term' residence:

L.K. v. Director-General Department of Community Services [2009] HCA 9, (2009) 253 ALR 202, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1012].

Open-Ended Moves

Where a move is open ended, or potentially open ended, the habitual residence at the time of the move may also be lost and a new one acquired relatively quickly, see:

United Kingdom - England and Wales (Non-Convention case)
Al Habtoor v. Fotheringham [2001] EWCA Civ 186, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 875];

New Zealand
Callaghan v. Thomas [2001] NZFLR 1105 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 413];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Cameron v. Cameron 1996 SC 17, 1996 SLT 306, 1996 SCLR 25 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 71];

Moran v. Moran 1997 SLT 541 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 74];

United States of America
Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 879].

Faits

La demande concernait un enfant né en mai 2004 en Australie de mère australienne et de père américain. Les parents n'étaient pas mariés. Le 13 juillet 2004, la mère alla aux Etats-Unis avec l'enfant, utilisant un billet simple. Elle s'installa au domicile du père.

Le 2 octobre, la mère et l'enfant allèrent dans un refuge pour femmes. Le 4 octobre, ils repartirent pour l'Australie. Le 21 juin 2005, l'Autorité centrale du Queensland fut saisie d'une demande de retour. Le 7 octobre le juge aux affaires familiales décida que le déplacement était illicite et ordonna le retour de l'enfant. La mère interjeta appel.

Dispositif

Appel accueilli et demande rejetée à la majorité; l'enfant n'avait pas sa résidence habituelle aux Etats-Unis à la date du déplacement.

Motifs

Résidence habituelle - art. 3

Le premier juge avait décidé que la mère n'avait jamais eu l'intention de vivre aux Etats-Unis de manière permanente, estimant qu'elle avait seulement l'intention d'emménager avec le père pour voir comment les choses pouvaient se passer entre eux. Il avait considéré qu'il n'y avait pas de raison que cette intention initiale de la mère ne soit pas devenue une intention de s'installer. Etant donné cette intention et le fait que la mère et l'enfant avaient vécu plus de 2 mois avec le père, il fallait considérer qu'elle, le père et l'enfant avaient obtenu une résidence habituelle aux Etats-Unis. Le juge reconnut que très vite après son arrivée la mère avait commencé à avoir des doutes concernant la viabilité de sa relation avec le père mais décida que cela n'empêchait pas la mère et l'enfant étaient alors déjà habituellement résidents aux Etats-Unis. Après un examen attentif de la jurisprudence australienne et anglaise, la majorité de la juridiction d'appel estima qu'il était impossible de conclure qu'une personne qui a pris résidence dans un Etat pour tester une relation avec une personne domiciliée dans cet Etat avait l'intention de s'y établir pour le long terme (le premier juge avait d'ailleurs admis que telle n'était pas l'intention de la mère) ni n'avait établi une résidence stable dans cet Etat pour une partie de sa vie. Dès lors la mère n'avait pas acquis de résidence habituelle aux Etats-Unis et il ne pouvait pas y avoir intention parentale commune d'établir une résidence habituelle dans cet Etat, de sorte que l'enfant lui-même ne pouvait être considéré comme ayant eu sa résidence habituelle aux Etats-Unis immédiatement avant son déplacement. En l'espèce, la majorité de la Cour admit que leur décision pouvait conduire à refuser à l'enfant le bénéfice de la Conventoin de La Haye, mais les juges estimèrent que l'intérêt des enfants en général pourrait pâtir d'un trop grand libéralisme judiciaire estimant qu'un parent qui tente de se réconcilier à l'étranger avec l'autre parent afin d'y créer une cellule familiale pour l'enfant peut se retrouver comme ayant sa résidence habituelle dans cet Etat. Le juge Holden manifesta son désaccord, estimant qu'il n'importait pas de savoir combien de temps la mère avait passé aux Etats-Unis ni si elle était certaine de vouloir y demeurer de manière permanente. C'était à bon droit selon lui que le juge du premier degré avait conclu que la mère et l'enfant avaient leur résidence habituelle aux Etats-Unis.

Commentaire INCADAT

Résidence habituelle

L'interprétation de la notion centrale de résidence habituelle (préambule, art. 3 et 4) s'est révélée particulièrement problématique ces dernières années, des divergences apparaissant dans divers États contractants. Une approche uniforme fait défaut quant à la question de savoir ce qui doit être au cœur de l'analyse : l'enfant seul, l'enfant ainsi que l'intention des personnes disposant de sa garde, ou simplement l'intention de ces personnes. En conséquence notamment de cette différence d'approche, la notion de résidence peut apparaître comme un élément de rattachement très flexible dans certains États contractants ou un facteur de rattachement plus rigide et représentatif d'une résidence à long terme dans d'autres.

L'analyse du concept de résidence habituelle est par ailleurs compliquée par le fait que les décisions concernent des situations factuelles très diverses. La question de la résidence habituelle peut se poser à l'occasion d'un déménagement permanent à l'étranger, d'un déménagement consistant en un test d'une durée illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée ou simplement d'un séjour à l'étranger de durée déterminée.

Tendances générales:

La jurisprudence des cours d'appel fédérales américaines illustre la grande variété d'interprétations données au concept de résidence habituelle.
Approche centrée sur l'enfant

La cour d'appel fédérale des États-Unis d'Amérique du 6e ressort s'est prononcée fermement en faveur d'une approche centrée sur l'enfant seul :

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 935]

Voir aussi :

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 221].

Approche combinée des liens de l'enfant et de l'intention parentale

Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis d'Amérique des 3e et 8e ressorts ont privilégié une méthode où les liens de l'enfant avec le pays ont été lus à la lumière de l'intention parentale conjointe.
Le jugement de référence est le suivant : Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 83].

Voir aussi :

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 530] ;

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Dans cette dernière espèce, une distinction a été pratiquée entre la situation d'enfants très jeunes (où une importance plus grande est attachée à l'intention des parents - voir par exemple : Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 808]) et celle d'enfants plus âgés pour lesquels l'intention parentale joue un rôle plus limité.

Approche centrée sur l'intention parentale

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel fédérale du 9e ressort a rendu une décision dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301], qui s'est révélée très influente en exigeant la présence d'une intention ferme d'abandonner une résidence préexistante pour qu'un enfant puisse acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle.

Cette interprétation a été reprise et précisée par d'autres décisions rendues en appel par des juridictions fédérales de sorte qu'en l'absence d'intention commune des parents en cas de départ pour l'étranger, la résidence habituelle a été maintenue dans le pays d'origine, alors même que l'enfant a passé une période longue à l'étranger.  Voir par exemple :

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 777] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour prévu de 4 ans en Allemagne ;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 780] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 32 mois au Mexique ;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT : HC/E/USf 482] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 27 mois en Grèce.

La décision rendue dans l'affaire Mozes a également été approuvée par les cours fédérales d'appel du 2e et du 7e ressort :

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 776] ;

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 878] ;

Il convient de noter que dans l'affaire Mozes, la Cour a reconnu que si suffisamment de temps s'est écoulé et que l'enfant a vécu une expérience positive, la vie de l'enfant peut être si fermement attachée à son nouveau milieu qu'une nouvelle résidence habituelle doit pouvoir y être acquise nonobstant l'intention parentale contraire.

Autres États contractants

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position a évolué :

Autriche
La Cour suprême d'Autriche a décidé qu'une résidence de plus de six mois dans un État sera généralement caractérisée de résidence habituelle, quand bien même elle aurait lieu contre la volonté du gardien de l'enfant (puisqu'il s'agit d'une détermination factuelle du centre de vie).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
Au Québec, au contraire, l'approche est centrée sur l'enfant :
Dans Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 651], la Cour d'appel de Montréal a décidé que la résidence habituelle d'un enfant est simplement une question de fait qui doit s'apprécier à la lumière de toutes les circonstances particulières de l'espèce en fonction de la réalité vécue par l'enfant en question, et non celle de ses parents. Le séjour doit être d'une durée non négligeable (nécessaire au développement de liens par l'enfant et à son intégration dans son nouveau milieu) et continue, aussi l'enfant doit-il avoir un lien réel et actif avec sa résidence; cependant, aucune durée minimale ne peut être formulée.

Allemagne
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort également de la jurisprudence allemande :

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale a ainsi admis qu'une résidence habituelle puisse être acquise bien que l'enfant ait été illicitement déplacé dans le nouvel État de résidence :

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

La Cour constitutionnelle a confirmé l'analyse de la Cour régionale d'appel selon laquelle les enfants avaient acquis leur résidence habituelle en France malgré la nature de leur déplacement là-bas. La Cour a en effet considéré  que la résidence habituelle était un concept factuel, et les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur milieu local pendant les neuf mois qu'ils y avaient vécu.

Israël
Des approches alternatives ont été adoptées lors de la détermination de la résidence habituelle. Il est arrivé qu'un poids important ait été accordé à l'intention parentale. Voir :

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865] ;

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

Cependant, il a parfois été fait référence à une approche plus centrée sur l'enfant. Voir :

décision de la Cour suprême dans C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241 ;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 922].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Contrairement à l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Mozes, la cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Zélande a expressément rejeté l'idée que pour acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, il convient d'avoir l'intention ferme de renoncer à la résidence habituelle précédente. Voir :

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suisse
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort de la jurisprudence suisse :

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Royaume-Uni
L'approche standard est de considérer conjointement la ferme intention des personnes ayant la charge de l'enfant et la réalité vécue par l'enfant.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Pour un commentaire doctrinal des différentes approches du concept de résidence habituelle dans les pays de common law. Voir :

R. Schuz, « Habitual Residence of  Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice », Child and Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 13, No1, 2001, p.1 ;

R. Schuz, « Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context » Journal of Transnational Law and Policy, Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Déménagement ou Installation à l'étranger

Lorsqu'une intention de s'installer à l'étranger pour y commencer un nouveau chapitre de sa vie est établie, la résidence habituelle préexistante va être perdue et une nouvelle résidence habituelle pourra rapidement être acquise.

Dans les pays de common law, il est admis que cette acquisition peut survenir rapidement, voir :

Canada
DeHaan v. Gracia [2004] AJ No.94 (QL), [2004] ABQD 4 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 576];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 2];

Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [1992] Fam Law 195 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 40]

Dans les pays de droit civil, il a été admis qu'une résidence habituelle peut être acquise immédiatement, voir:
 
Suisse
5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Déménagements soumis à une condition future

Si l'accord des parents concernant le déménagement est soumis à une condition future, la résidence habituelle qui existait avant le déménagement est-elle perdue immédiatement lors du déménagement ?

Australie

Le tribunal familial australien (the Family Court of Australia) siégeant en séance plénière a répondu par la négative à cette question et a également déclaré que la perte de la résidence habituelle pouvait même ne pas découler de la réalisation de la condition en question, si à ce moment-là le parent désirant déménager ne s'engage pas clairement à déménager :

Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 995].

Cependant, cette décision a été renversée en appel par la Haute Cour d'Australie, qui a considéré qu'une résidence habituelle existante pouvait être perdue si la volonté de déménager présentait un degré suffisant de continuité pour être décrite comme ferme. Il n'était donc pas nécessaire d'avoir une ferme intention d'établir sa résidence sur le « long terme ».

L.K. v. Director-General Department of Community Services [2009] HCA 9, (2009) 253 ALR 202, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1012].

Installation à l'étranger pour une durée illimitée

Lorsque la durée de l'installation à l'étranger est illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée, il est également possible de perdre une résidence habituelle antérieure et d'en acquérir une nouvelle relativement rapidement. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles (cas ne relevant pas de la Convention)
Al Habtoor v. Fotheringham [2001] EWCA Civ 186 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 875] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
Callaghan v. Thomas [2001] NZFLR 1105 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 413] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Cameron v. Cameron 1996 SC 17, 1996 SLT 306, 1996 SCLR 25 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 71] ;

Moran v. Moran 1997 SLT 541 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 74] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].