CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51

INCADAT reference

HC/E/UKe 880

Court

Country

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Name

House of Lords

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Lord Nicholls of Birkenhead, Lord Hope of Craighead, Baroness Hale of Richmond, Lord Carswell and Lord Brown of Eaton-Under-Heywood

States involved

Requesting State

ROMANIA

Requested State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Decision

Date

16 November 2006

Status

Final

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3 | Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Article 15 Decision or Determination | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2) | Human Rights - Art. 20 | Rights of Access - Art. 21

Order

Appeal allowed, application dismissed

HC article(s) Considered

3 12 13(1)(a) 13(1)(b) 13(2) 15 20 21 13(3)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

15

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
C. v. C. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [1989] 1 WLR 654; Furnes v Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004); D.S. v. V.W. [1996] 2 SCR 108; Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [2005] Fam 293; Re W. (Minors) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1; J., Petitioner [2005] CSIH 36; Croll v. Croll 229 F 3d 133 (2d Cir 2000), cert denied, 534 US 949 (2001); Gonzalez v. Gutierrez 311 F 3d 942 (9th Cir 2002); Fawcett v. McRoberts 326 F 3d 491 (4th Cir 2003), cert denied 540 US 1068; Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171; Bader v. Kramer 445 F 3d 346 (4th Cir 2006); Re H (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72; In re W.; In re B. (Child Abduction: Unmarried Father) [1998] 2 FLR 146; G. v. B. [1995] NZFLR 49; D v C [1999] NZFLR 97; Hunter v. Murrow (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2005] EWCA Civ 976; Director General, Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Hobbs [1999] FamCA 2059; In re H. (A Minor)(Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2000] 2 AC 291; In re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562; In re V-B (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192; In re P. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [2004] EWCA Civ 971; In re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247; In re G. (A Minor) (Enforcement of Access Abroad) [1993] Fam 216; In re T. and Others (Minors) (Hague Convention: Access) [1993] 2 FLR 617.

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
Article 15 Decision or Determination
Sources of Custody Rights
Who may Hold Rights of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Habitual Residence
Habitual Residence

Exceptions to Return

General Issues
Limited Nature of the Exceptions
Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection
Separate Representation
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms
Grave Risk of Harm
UK - England and Wales Case Law

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to a boy born in Romania in July 1998. The parents were divorced and the mother was granted the primary role of care for the child. In the autumn of 2002 the mother moved to the United Kingdom, got married and commenced a degree course. The child remained in Romania and was cared for by the maternal grandparents. On 24 December 2002 the mother took the child to England.

On 14 February 2003 a return application was issued in the High Court. The case was listed for trial on 12 May. The wrongfulness of the removal was contested and the Court ordered that an Article 15 declaration be sought from the Romanian authorities. On 25 May 2004 a court of first instance in Bucharest ruled that the father only had rights of access.

The father appealed. On 9 June 2005 the Court of Appeal of Bucharest reaffirmed the ruling of the court of first instance. On 1 August 2005 the High Court in London granted a request by the father that an expert opinion on Romanian law be made to clarify the Romanian judgments. There were then further procedural hearings during the autumn of 2005. On 1 March 2006 the High Court ordered the return of the boy to Romania.

On 25 May this ruling was upheld by the Court of Appeal: Deak v Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 866]. The mother was subsequently granted leave to appeal and the child was granted leave to intervene and be separately represented.

Ruling

Appeal allowed and application dismissed; the inferior courts had erred in rejecting the determination of the Romanian courts pursuant to Article 15; under Romanian law the father had no rights of custody for Convention purposes therefore the removal of the child was not wrongful.

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3


Whilst not determinative for the case, consideration was given by several of the Law Lords to the issue of habitual residence. Lord Hope, with whom Lord Brown agreed, stated that it was scarcely tenable that the child could still be regarded as habitually resident in Romania. Baroness Hale remarked that the child had settled in England within the meaning of Article 12.

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

Whilst not determinative for the case, consideration was given by several of the Law Lords to the meaning of the term "rights of custody" for the purposes of the Convention.

Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, held that "rights of custody" and "rights of access" were not mutually exclusive concepts. She added that the problem which frequently arose in Convention cases was the characterisation of the rights held by the parent who did not have day to day care of the child.

In particular, the effect of travel restrictions: either a court order prohibiting the removal of the child from the home country or a "right of veto" giving one parent, who may or may not also have rights of access, the right to insist that the other parent does not remove the child from the home country without his or her consent or a court order.

She accepted that there was force in the argument that a right of veto was not a right of custody. It was argued for the mother that a right of custody should mean the right to determine where the child actually lives and not merely the country of residence. A right of veto was simply to facilitate the exercise of the right of access. Baroness Hale accepted that this argument was strengthened when the paradigm abduction case envisaged by the drafters was considered.

Furthermore, it was also the case that some parents with a right of veto had very limited contact with their children, making a return order in such cases seem heavy handed. However, she affirmed that the circumstances of families were various. It was an object of the Convention to allow custody to be taken in the courts of the child's home country.

It was not for the courts of the requested State to make value judgments about the merits of the case. For the purposes of the Convention either a person had rights of custody or had not, the quality of the relationship with the child was not in point.

She concluded that it would be an odd result if a Convention designed to secure the summary return of children wrongfully removed from their home countries were not to result in the return of children whose removal had clearly been in breach of the laws, court orders or enforceable agreements in the home country. She stated therefore that a right of veto should be considered to be a right of custody. Moreover there should be no difference between a parental right of veto and a right of veto held by a court.

Lord Hope, with whom Lord Brown agreed, called for a uniform interpretation in all the Member States of the concept of rights of custody. He further held that the fact a right to determine the place of the child's residence may help a parent who seeks access was not a reason for treating the right to determine where the child should live as something other than a right of custody for Convention purposes.

Lord Carswell noted the cogency of the reasons put forward by Lord Hope and Baroness Hale but stated that he would rather reserve his view on the issue of rights of custody until the matter fell directly for consideration.

Article 15 Decision or Determination

The House of Lords held unanimously that where an Article 15 decision or determination is sought the ruling of the foreign court as to the content of the rights held by the applicant must be treated as conclusive, save in exceptional cases where, for example, the ruling has been obtained by fraud or in breach of the rules of natural justice.

Such circumstances were absent in the present case therefore the trial court and the Court of Appeal had erred in disregarding the decision of the Bucharest Court of Appeal and in allowing fresh evidence to be adduced. The appeal would therefore be allowed and the return application dismissed for the Romanian appellate decision made clear that the father had no rights of custody and therefore the removal was not wrongful.

Whilst not determinative for the case consideration was given by several of the Law Lords to the role and application of Article 15.

Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, disagreed with the suggestion of the Court of Appeal that Article 15 would be more useful if it were directed solely to ascertaining the rights which existed under the domestic law of the requesting State rather than also the classification of those rights.

She specified that the foreign court would be much better placed than the English court to understand the true meaning and effect of its own laws in Convention terms. Only if the characterisation of the parent's rights was clearly out of line with the international understanding of the Convention's terms, as may well have been the case in Hunter v Murrow, should the court in the requested state decline to follow it.

For his part Lord Brown affirmed that the determination of content and classification by the foreign court should almost invariably be treated as conclusive.

The Law Lords noted that recourse to Article 15 would lead to delay. Lord Carswell affirmed that resort to the procedure should therefore be kept to a minimum. Lord Brown noted that it would only be used on rare occasions. Lord Hope counselled against seeking perfection in ascertaining whether a removal or retention was wrongful, rather a balance had to be struck between acting on too little information and searching for too much. Baroness Hale noted that when a country first accedes to the Convention Article 15 might be useful in cases of doubt to obtain an authoritative ruling on the content and effect of the local law.
 

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)


Whilst not determinative for the case consideration was given by several of the Law Lords to the application of the exceptions, in particular Article 13(1)(b).

Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, noted how the Perez-Véra Report affirmed that the exceptions within the Convention had to be interpreted strictly if the objects of the instrument were not to be defeated. However she recorded in her conclusions that the Convention did not require the return of each and every child brought to this country without the consent of the other parent. There were some cases, albeit few in number, where this was not required.

She further observed that whilst it was possible to envisage circumstances where a child might be returned notwithstanding a finding that there had been consent, acquiescence, or the child objected to a return, it was inconceivable that a return could be ordered where Article 13(1)(b) had been made out.

She added that courts should not seek to judge the morality of an abductor's actions. To get to the Article 13 stage the actions of the abductor will by definition be wrongful; moral condemnation was therefore both unnecessary and superfluous.

The court would have heard none of the evidence which would enable it to make a moral evaluation of the abductor's actions. Moreover whilst some abductors may have been morally wicked, this would not always be the case, particularly where the abductor was fleeing from violence, abuse or oppression in the home.

Baroness Hale did not decide the matter but noted that the delay experienced by the child in the present case was a factor in deciding whether his summary return would be intolerable. Lord Hope, with whom Lord Brown agreed, stated that the delays in the case were so extreme it was impossible to believe that the child's best interests would be served by a return forthwith to Romania.

Lord Carswell stated that he would be slow to reverse the findings of the lower courts with regard to Article 13. He noted that the House of Lords would only be entitled to so act if the lower judgments were plainly wrong and he was not convinced that they were.

Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)


Whilst not determinative for the case consideration was given by several of the Law Lords to the application of Article 13(2).

Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, observed that children were quite capable of being moral actors in their own right. Just as adults may have to do what a court decided whether they liked it or not, so may the child. But that was no more a reason for failing to hear what the child had to say than it was for refusing to hear the parents' views.

Baroness Hale noted that the reform introduced by the Brussels II bis Regulation - providing that children should be heard unless this was inappropriate - would lead to children being heard more frequently in Hague cases than had hitherto happened. In considering how effect should be given to this new principle she affirmed that it was not enough to say that the abductor could present the child's views.

She noted that in England the primary means would be through a court welfare officer, although the child could be heard by the judge, particularly if the child requested this. However, whenever it seemed likely that the child's views and interests may not be properly presented to the court, and in particular where there were legal arguments which the adult parties were not putting forward, then the child should be separately represented.

She held that delay should not be an issue if the child's views were sought at the outset of the proceedings and added that there was no reason why the approach to be followed in EU cases should not be applied in all Hague cases.

Lord Carswell stated that he would not readily upset the decision of the lower courts to refuse the child representation. He added that care should be taken when considering the weight to be given to the views of a seven year old child, since such a child could entertain misapprehensions and might have only limited insights into his own best interests. However, he accepted that courts should take account of the factors listed by Baroness Hale favouring hearing the views of children.

Human Rights - Art. 20


Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, observed that while the present case was not one in which to consider arguments with regard to the European Convention on Human Rights, such arguments would not always be irrelevant in Hague Convention cases. She noted that whilst Article 20 was not applicable in the United Kingdom it had in essence been given effect through the adoption of the Human Rights Act 1998.

Rights of Access - Art. 21


Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, recommended the elaboration of a procedure whereby the facilitation of rights of access in the United Kingdom under Article 21 could be contemplated at the same time as the return of the child under Article 12.

INCADAT comment

Article 15 Decision or Determination

The Role and Interpretation of Article 15

Article 15 is an innovative mechanism which reflects the cooperation which is central to the 1980 Hague Convention.  It provides that the authorities of a Contracting State may, prior to making a return order, request that the applicant obtain from the authorities of the child's State of habitual residence a decision or other determination that the removal or retention was wrongful within the meaning of Article 3 of the Convention, where such a decision or determination may be obtained in that State. The Central Authorities of the Contracting States shall so far as practicable assist applicants to obtain such a decision or determination.

Scope of the Article 15 Decision or Determination Mechanism

Common law jurisdictions are divided as to the role to be played by the Article 15 mechanism, in particular whether the court in the child's State of habitual residence should make a finding as to the wrongfulness of the removal or retention, or, whether it should limit its decision to the extent to which the applicant possesses custody rights under its own law.  This division cannot be dissociated from the autonomous nature of custody rights for Convention purposes as well as that of 'wrongfulness' i.e. when rights of custody are to be deemed to have been breached.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The Court of Appeal favoured a very strict position with regard to the scope of Article 15:

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court held that where the question for determination in the requested State turned on a point of autonomous Convention law (e.g. wrongfulness) then it would be difficult to envisage any circumstances in which an Article 15 request would be worthwhile.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 866].

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

Whilst there was unanimity as to the utility and binding nature of a ruling of a foreign court as to the content of the rights held by an applicant, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, further specified that the foreign court would additionally be much better placed than the English court to understand the true meaning and effect of its own laws in Convention terms.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

A majority in the Court of Appeal, approving of the position adopted by the English Court of Appeal in Hunter v. Morrow, held that a court seised of an Article 15 decision or determination should restrict itself to reporting on matters of national law and not stray into the classification of a removal as being wrongful or not; the latter was exclusively a matter for the court in the State of refuge in the light of its assessment of the autonomous law of the Convention. 

Status of an Article 15 Decision or Determination

The status to be accorded to an Article 15 decision or determination has equally generated controversy, in particular the extent to which a foreign ruling should be determinative as regards the existence, or inexistence, of custody rights and in relation to the issue of wrongfulness.

Australia
In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

The court noted that a decision or determination under Article 15 was persuasive only and that it was ultimately a matter for the French courts to decide whether there had been a wrongful removal.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court of Appeal held that an Article 15 decision or determination was not binding and it rejected the determination of wrongfulness made by the New Zealand High Court: M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1021]. In so doing it noted that New Zealand courts did not recognise the sharp distinction between rights of custody and rights of access which had been accepted in the United Kingdom.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 866].

The Court of Appeal declined to accept the finding of the Romanian courts that the father did not have rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

The House of Lords held unanimously that where an Article 15 decision or determination was sought the ruling of the foreign court as to the content of the rights held by the applicant must be treated as conclusive, save in exceptional cases where, for example, the ruling had been obtained by fraud or in breach of the rules of natural justice. Such circumstances were absent in the present case, therefore the trial court and the Court of Appeal had erred in disregarding the decision of the Bucharest Court of Appeal and in allowing fresh evidence to be adduced.

As regards the characterisation of the parent's rights, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, held that it would only be where this was clearly out of line with the international understanding of the Convention's terms, as might well have been the case in Hunter v. Murrow, should the court in the requested state decline to follow it. For his part Lord Brown affirmed that the determination of content and classification by the foreign court should almost invariably be treated as conclusive.

Switzerland
5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953].

The Swiss supreme court held that a finding on custody rights would in principle bind the authorities in the requested State.  As regards an Article 15 decision or determination, the court noted that commentators were divided as to the effect in the requested State and it declined to make a finding on the issue.

Practical Implications of Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Recourse to the Article 15 mechanism will inevitably lead to delay in the conduct of a return petition, particularly should there happen to be an appeal against the original determination by the authorities in the State of habitual residence. See for example:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

This practical reality has in turn generated a wide range of judicial views.

In Re D. a variety of opinions were canvassed. Lord Carswell affirmed that resort to the procedure should be kept to a minimum. Lord Brown noted that it would only be used on rare occasions. Lord Hope counselled against seeking perfection in ascertaining whether a removal or retention was wrongful, rather a balance had to be struck between acting on too little information and searching for too much. Baroness Hale noted that when a country first acceded to the Convention Article 15 might be useful in cases of doubt to obtain an authoritative ruling on the content and effect of the local law.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

The majority in the Court of Appeal, suggested that Article 15 requests should only rarely be made as between Australia and New Zealand, given the similarities of the legal systems.

Alternatives to Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Whilst courts may simply wish to determine the foreign law in the light of the available information, an alternative is to seek expert evidence.  Experience in England and Wales has shown that this is far from fool-proof and does not necessarily result in time being saved, see: 

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1020].

In the latter case Thorpe L.J. suggested that greater recourse could be made to the European Judicial Network, through the International Family Law Office at the Royal Courts of Justice. Pragmatic advice could be offered as to the best route to follow in a particular case: whether to go for a single joint expert; whether to go for an Article 15 decision or determination; or whether to go for an opinion from the liaison judge as to the law of his own country, an opinion that would not be binding but which would perhaps help the parties and the trial court to see the weight, or want of weight, in the challenge to the plaintiff's ability to cross the Article 3 threshold.

Habitual Residence

The interpretation of the central concept of habitual residence (Preamble, Art. 3, Art. 4) has proved increasingly problematic in recent years with divergent interpretations emerging in different jurisdictions. There is a lack of uniformity as to whether in determining habitual residence the emphasis should be exclusively on the child, with regard paid to the intentions of the child's care givers, or primarily on the intentions of the care givers. At least partly as a result, habitual residence may appear a very flexible connecting factor in some Contracting States yet much more rigid and reflective of long term residence in others.

Any assessment of the interpretation of habitual residence is further complicated by the fact that cases focusing on the concept may concern very different factual situations. For example habitual residence may arise for consideration following a permanent relocation, or a more tentative move, albeit one which is open-ended or potentially open-ended, or indeed the move may be for a clearly defined period of time.

General Trends:

United States Federal Appellate case law may be taken as an example of the full range of interpretations which exist with regard to habitual residence.

Child Centred Focus

The United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit has advocated strongly for a child centred approach in the determination of habitual residence:

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 935].

See also:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 221].

Combined Child's Connection / Parental Intention Focus

The United States Courts of Appeals for the 3rd and 8th Circuits, have espoused a child centred approach but with reference equally paid to the parents' present shared intentions.

The key judgment is that of Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 83].

See also:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 879].

In the latter case a distinction was drawn between the situation of very young children, where particular weight was placed on parental intention(see for example: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 808]) and that of older children where the impact of parental intention was more limited.

Parental Intention Focus

The judgment of the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 301] has been highly influential in providing that there should ordinarily be a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence before a child can acquire a new one.

This interpretation has been endorsed and built upon in other Federal appellate decisions so that where there was not a shared intention on the part of the parents as to the purpose of the move this led to an existing habitual residence being retained, even though the child had been away from that jurisdiction for an extended period of time. See for example:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 777]: United States habitual residence retained after 8 months of an intended 4 year stay in Germany;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 780]: United States habitual residence retained during 32 month stay in Mexico;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 482]: United States habitual residence retained during 27 month stay in Greece.

The Mozes approach has also been approved of by the Federal Court of Appeals for the 2nd and 7th Circuits:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 878].

It should be noted that within the Mozes approach the 9th Circuit did acknowledge that given enough time and positive experience, a child's life could become so firmly embedded in the new country as to make it habitually resident there notwithstanding lingering parental intentions to the contrary.

Other Jurisdictions

There are variations of approach in other jurisdictions:

Austria
The Supreme Court of Austria has ruled that a period of residence of more than six months in a State will ordinarily be characterized as habitual residence, and even if it takes place against the will of the custodian of the child (since it concerns a factual determination of the centre of life).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
In the Province of Quebec, a child centred focus is adopted:

In Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 651], the Cour d'appel de Montréal held that the determination of the habitual residence of a child was a purely factual issue to be decided in the light of the circumstances of the case with regard to the reality of the child's life, rather than that of his parents. The actual period of residence must have endured for a continuous and not insignificant period of time; the child must have a real and active link to the place, but there is no minimum period of residence which is specified.

Germany
A child centred, factual approach is also evident in German case law:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 944].

This has led to the Federal Constitutional Court accepting that a habitual residence may be acquired notwithstanding the child having been wrongfully removed to the new State of residence:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 233].

The Constitutional Court upheld the finding of the Higher Regional Court that the children had acquired a habitual residence in France, notwithstanding the nature of their removal there. This was because habitual residence was a factual concept and during their nine months there, the children had become integrated into the local environment.

Israel
Alternative approaches have been adopted when determining the habitual residence of children. On occasion, strong emphasis has been placed on parental intentions. See:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 939].

However, reference has been made to a more child centred approach in other cases. See:

decision of the Supreme Court in C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 922].

New Zealand
In contrast to the Mozes approach the requirement of a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence was specifically rejected by a majority of the New Zealand Court of Appeal. See

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 816].

Switzerland
A child centred, factual approach is evident in Swiss case law:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841].

United Kingdom
The standard approach is to consider the settled intention of the child's carers in conjunction with the factual reality of the child's life.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 2]. For academic commentary on the different models of interpretation given to habitual residence. See:

R. Schuz, "Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice", Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13, No. 1, 2001, p. 1;

R. Schuz, "Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context", Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Limited Nature of the Exceptions

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Separate Representation

There is a lack of uniformity in English speaking jurisdictions with regard to separate representation for children.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
An early appellate judgment established that in keeping with the summary nature of Convention proceedings, separate representation should only be allowed in exceptional circumstances.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 56].

Reaffirmed by:

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881];

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905].

The exceptional circumstances standard has been established in several cases, see:

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 57];

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 180];

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 168];

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 579];

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 829];

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 964].

In Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881] it was suggested by Thorpe L.J. that the bar had been raised by the Brussels II a Regulation insofar as applications for party status were concerned.

This suggestion was rejected by Baroness Hale in:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880]. Without departing from the exceptional circumstances test, she signalled the need, in the light of the new Community child abduction regime, for a re-appraisal of the way in which the views of abducted children were to be ascertained. In particular she argued for views to be sought at the outset of proceedings to avoid delays.

In Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905] Thorpe L.J. acknowledged that the bar had not been raised in applications for party status.  He rejected the suggestion that the bar had been lowered by the House of Lords in Re D.

However, in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937] Baroness Hale again intervened in the debate and affirmed that a directions judge should evaluate whether separate representation would add enough to the Court's understanding of the issues to justify the resultant intrusion, delay and expense which would follow.  This would suggest a more flexible test, however, she also added that children should not be given an exaggerated impression of the relevance and importance of their views and in the general run of cases party status would not be accorded.

Australia
Australia's supreme jurisdiction sought to break from an exceptional circumstances test in De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

However, the test was reinstated by the legislator in the Family Law Amendment Act 2000, see: Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

See:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
Children heard under Art 13(2) can be assisted by a lawyer (art 338-5 NCPC and art 388-1 Code Civil - the latter article specifies however that children so assisted are not conferred the status of a party to the proceedings), see:

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 853].

In Scotland & New Zealand there has been a much greater willingness to allow children separate representation, see for example:

United Kingdom - Scotland
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962];

M. Petitioner 2005 SLT 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 508];

New Zealand
K.S v.L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 532].

Sources of Custody Rights

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

UK - England and Wales Case Law

The English Court of Appeal has taken a very strict approach to Article 13 (1) b) and it is rare indeed for the exception to be upheld.  Examples of where the standard has been reached include:

Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 8];

Re M. (Abduction: Psychological Harm) [1997] 2 FLR 690, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 86];

Re M. (Abduction: Leave to Appeal) [1999] 2 FLR 550, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 263];

Re D. (Article 13B: Non-return) [2006] EWCA Civ 146, [2006] 2 FLR 305, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 818];

Klentzeris v. Klentzeris [2007] EWCA Civ 533, [2007] 2 FLR 996 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 931].

Who may Hold Rights of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Faits

L'affaire concernait un enfant né en Roumanie en Juillet 1998. Les parents avaient divorcé et la mère avait la garde physique de l'enfant. A l'automne 2002, la mère s'installa au Royaume-Uni, s'y maria et s'inscrivit à l'Université. L'enfant resta en Roumanie avec ses grands-parents maternels. Le 24 décembre 2002, la mère amena l'enfant en Angleterre.

Le 14 février 2003 la High Court fut saisie d'une demande de retour. L'audience se tint le 12 mai. La question de l'illicéité du déplacement était débattue de sorte que la Cour demanda une déclaration de l'article 15 aux autorités roumaines. Le 25 mai 2004 un tribunal de première instance de Bucarest décida que le père n'avait qu'un droit de visite sur l'enfant.

Le père forma appel de cette décision et le 9 juin 2005 la cour d'appel de Bucarest confirma la décision de première instance. Le 1er août 2005 la High Court accueillit la demande du père tendant à voir désigner un expert en droit roumain de manière à clarifier la teneur des jugements roumains. D'autres audiences procédurales s'ensuivirent. Le 1er mars 2006 la High Court ordonna le retour de l'enfant en Roumanie.

La mère forma appel de cette décision. L'enfant demanda à interjeter également appel mais fut débouté de cette demande. Le recours de la mère fut rejeté en appel rejeté et le retour ordonné ; selon la cour d'appel le déplacement était illicite et aucune des exceptions prévues par la Convention n'étaient applicables. Voy. : [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 866]. La mère forma un recours devant la Chambre des Lords.

Dispositif

Recours accueilli et demande rejetée; les juridictions inférieures n'auraient pas dû rejeter la position adoptée par les juridictions roumaines dans le cadre de l'article 15. En droit roumain, le père n'avait pas de droit de garde au sens de la Convention de sorte que le déplacement de l'enfant n'était pas illicite.

Motifs

Résidence habituelle - art. 3


Bien que ce point soit sans incidence sur l'issue de l'affaire, plusieurs juges se prononcèrent sur la question de la résidence habituelle. Le juge Hope, suivi par le juge Brown, indiqua qu'il était difficile d'admettre que l'enfant avait encore sa résidence habituelle en Roumanie. Le juge Hale observa que l'enfant s'était intégré en Angleterre au sens de l'article 12.

Droit de garde - art. 3


Bien que cette question soit sans incidence sur l'issue de l'affaire, plusieurs juges s'exprimèrent sur le sens de l'expression « droit de garde » dans la Convention.

Le juge Hale, suivie sur ce point par les juges Hope et Brown estima que les notions de droit de garde et droit de visite ne s'excluaient pas mutuellement. Elle ajouta que le problème se posait fréquemment dans les affaires relevant de la Convention de savoir quel droit avait le parent avec lequel l'enfant ne vivait pas au quotidien.

En particulier, la question des limitations imposées aux déplacements à l'étranger était épineuse: par exemple lorsqu'un tribunal interdit la sortie du territoire de l'enfant, qu'un droit de veto est donné à un parent qui dispose ou non d'un droit de visite, ou encore lorsqu'existe une obligation pour un parent de ne pas sortir l'enfant du territoire sans avoir préalablement obtenu l'aval de l'autre parent ou une autorisation judiciaire.

Le juge Hale reconnut que l'argument selon lequel un droit de veto n'est pas un droit de garde n'était pas sans force. Selon la mère un droit de garde incluait nécessairement le droit de définir le lieu de résidence de l'enfant, pas seulement son pays de réidence, un droit de veto s'analysant simplement comme un droit facilitant l'exercice d'un droit de visite.

Elle admit également que cet argument était renforcé lorsque l'on considérait le type d'enlèvement auquel les négociateurs de la Convention répondaient. Il fallait également reconnaître que certains parents disposant d'un droit de veto avaient pas ailleurs des contacts fort limités avec les enfants, d'où le sentiment qu'une ordonnance de retour pouvait apparaître mal adaptée au contexte familial.

Le juge Hale affirma toutefois qu'il y avait une grande variété de modèles familiaux. La Convention s'efforçait de faire en sorte que les juges de l'Etat de résidence habituelle de l'enfant connaissent du fond de l'affaire. Au sens de la Convention, une personne avait ou non un droit de garde, la qualité de la relation entre cette personne et l'enfant était sans importance.

Elle conclut qu'il serait bizarre qu'une Convention dont le but est de renvoyer les enfants victimes de déplacement illicite dans leur Etat de résidence habituelle ne conduisait pas au retour d'un enfant dont le déplacement est clairement intervenu en violation des dispositions légales, de judiciaires ou contractuelles applicables dans l'Etat d'origine. Il convenait donc de considérer qu'un droit de veto est un droit de garde et de ne pas distinguer le droit de veto parental du droit de veto judiciaire.

Le juge Hope, suivi sur ce point par le juge Brown, appela de ses voeux une interprétation uniforme dans tous les Etats contractants de la notion de droit de garde. Il estima que le fait qu'un droit de participer au choix du lieu de résidence de l'enfant puisse aider dans l'exercice d'un droit de visite n'empêchait pas de traiter ce droit comme un droit de garde au sens de la Convention.

Le juge Carswell observa que le raisonnement des juges Hope et Hale était solide mais préféra réserver son opinion puisque la question n'était pas déterminante pour l'issue de l'espèce.

Déclaration selon l'article 15
La Chambre des Lords décida unanimement que lorsqu'une déclaration de l'article 15 est demandée, la décision étrangère rendue dans ce cadre doit être traitée comme s'imposant au juge qui l'a demandée, sauf sans les cas exceptionnels où, par exemple, cette déclaration a été obtenue par fraude ou en violation des principes de justice naturelle.

De telles circonstances étaient étrangères à l'espèce de sorte que le premier juge comme la Cour d'appel auraient dû suivre la décision rendue par la cour de Bucarest et refuser la production de nouveaux éléments de preuve. Le recours devait être accueilli et la demande de retour rejetée puisque la décision de la cour d'appel roumaine indiquait que le père n'avait de droit de garde et que le déplacement n'était pas illicite.

Bien que cela reste sans incidence sur l'issue de l'affaire dont ils étaient saisis, plusieurs juges s'exprimèrent sur le rôle et l'application de l'article 15.

Le juge Hale, suivie sur ce point par les juges Hope et Brown montra son désaccord avec la position de la Cur d'appel selon laquelle l'article 15 serait plus utile s'il permettait d'établir quels droits existaient en droit interne dans l'Etat requis plutôt que la qualification juridique de ces droits.

Elle observa que la juridiction étrangère était bien mieux placée que le juge anglais pour déterminer le sens et l'effet exact de son propre droit au sens de la Convention. C'est seulement en cas de dénaturation des termes de la Convention, comme il semblait que cela ait été le cas dans l'affaire, que les juridictions de l'Etat requis pouvaient décider de refuser de suivre la déclaration étrangère.

Pour sa part, le juge Brown affirma que l'analyse du contenu du droit et la qualification retenue par le juge étranger devaient presque systématiquement s'imposer.

Les juges observèrent que le recours à l'article 15 était susceptible de causer des retards. Le juge Carswell affirma par conséquent que l'usage de cette procédure devait rester « minimal » . Le juge Brown indiqua que l'article 15 ne devait être utilisé que dans de « rares occasions » .

Lord Hope estima qu'il ne fallait pas chercher la perfection dans l'établissement de l'illicéité d'un déplacement ou d'un non-retour mais trouver un juste milieu entre trop ou trop peu d'information. Le juge Hale considéra que lorsqu'un pays vient juste d'adhérer à la Convention l'article 15 peut être utile en cas de doute.

Décision ou attestation selon l'article 15

La Chambre des Lords décida unanimement que lorsqu'une attestation de l'article 15 est demandée, la décision étrangère rendue dans ce cadre doit être traitée comme s'imposant au juge qui l'a demandée, sauf sans les cas exceptionnels où, par exemple, cette attestation a été obtenue par fraude ou en violation des principes de justice naturelle.

De telles circonstances étaient étrangères à l'espèce de sorte que le premier juge comme la Cour d'appel auraient dû suivre la décision rendue par la cour de Bucarest et refuser la production de nouveaux éléments de preuve. Le recours devait être accueilli et la demande de retour rejetée puisque la décision de la cour d'appel roumaine indiquait que le père n'avait de droit de garde et que le déplacement n'était pas illicite.

Bien que cela reste sans incidence sur l'issue de l'affaire dont ils étaient saisis, plusieurs juges s'exprimèrent sur le rôle et l'application de l'article 15.

Le juge Hale, suivie sur ce point par les juges Hope et Brown montra son désaccord avec la position de la Cur d'appel selon laquelle l'article 15 serait plus utile s'il permettait d'établir quels droits existaient en droit interne dans l'Etat requis plutôt que la qualification juridique de ces droits.

Elle observa que la juridiction étrangère était bien mieux placée que le juge anglais pour déterminer le sens et l'effet exact de son propre droit au sens de la Convention. C'est seulement en cas de dénaturation des termes de la Convention, comme il semblait que cela ait été le cas dans l'affaire, que les juridictions de l'Etat requis pouvaient décider de refuser de suivre la déclaration étrangère.

Pour sa part, le juge Brown affirma que l'analyse du contenu du droit et la qualification retenue par le juge étranger devaient presque systématiquement s'imposer.

Les juges observèrent que le recours à l'article 15 était susceptible de causer des retards. Le juge Carswell affirma par conséquent que l'usage de cette procédure devait rester « minimal » . Le juge Brown indiqua que l'article 15 ne devait être utilisé que dans de « rares occasions » .

Lord Hope estima qu'il ne fallait pas chercher la perfection dans l'établissement de l'illicéité d'un déplacement ou d'un non-retour mais trouver un juste milieu entre trop ou trop peu d'information. Le juge Hale considéra que lorsqu'un pays vient juste d'adhérer à la Convention l'article 15 peut être utile en cas de doute.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)


Bien que cela soit sans incidence sur l'issue de l'affaire, plusieurs juges discutèrent l'application des exceptions, notamment de l'article 13 alinéa 1 b.

Le juge Hale, suivie sur ce point par les juges Hope et Brown, observa que le rapport Perez-Véra indique que les exceptions sont d'interprétation stricte afin que les objectifs de l'instrument puissent être atteints. Toutefois, elle remarqua dans ses conclusions que la Convention n'exigeait pas que tout enfant enlevé soit renvoyé. Il était des cas, quoique peu nombreux, où il convenait de ne pas renvoyer l'enfant.

Elle ajouta que s'il était possible d'envisager des situations dans lesquelles un enfant peut être renvoyé nonobstant l'existence d'un consentement, d'un acquiescement ou d'une opposition de l'enfant au retour, il n'était pas possible d'admettre le renvoi de l'enfant lorsque l'article 13 alinéa 1 b était applicable.

Elle indiqua que les juges ne doivent pas s'intéresser à la moralité des actes du parent rapteur. Si on considère l'application de l'article 13, les actes du parent rapteur sont par définition illicites; leur condamnation morale est donc inutile et superflue. Le juge n'a pas en main les preuves de l'immoralité des actes du parent rapteur. En outre, bien que certains parents rapteurs puissent être des êtres dénués de sens moral, ce n'était pas toujours le cas, notamment lorsqu'ils fuient des situation de violence, d'abus ou d'oppression.

Le juge Hale ne se prononça pas sur ce point mais souligna que les retards ayant affecté l'enfant en l'espèce pouvaient justifier partiellement qu'on considère son retour comme intolérable. Lord Hope, suivi par Lord Brown, estima que les retards étaient si extrêmes qu'on ne voyait pas comment le retour immédiat de l'enfant en Roumanie pouvait être dnas l'intérêt supérieur de celui-ci.

Lord Carswell indiqua qu'il convenait de ne pas rejeter la position des juges inférieurs quant à l'article 13 trop rapidement. Il n'appartenait à la Chambre des Lords de le faire uniquement s'il était patent que les juges du premier et du deuxième degré étaient dans l'erreur. Il n'était pas convaincu que ce soit le cas.

Droits de l'homme - art. 20
Le juge Hale, suivie sur ce point par les juges Hope et Brown, observa que si l'espèce n'imposait pas qu'on envisage des arguments tirés de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme, de tels arguments pourraient être pertinents dans le cadre d'affaires relevant de la Convention de La Haye. Certes l'article 20 de la Convention n'est pas applicable au Royaume-Uni (car il n'est pas inclu dans l'instrument mettant en vigueur la Convention au Royaume-Uni, ndlr), l'adoption de la loi sur les droits de l'homme de 1998 lui donnait effet.

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)
Bien que ce point soit sans incidence sur l'issue de l'affaire, plusieurs juges se prononcèrent sur l'application de l'article 13 alinéa 2.

Le juge Hale, suivie par les juges Hope et Brown, observa que les enfants étaient capables d'être des acteurs à part entière. De même que les adultes, les enfants doivent parfois se conformer à des decisions judiciaires, que cela leur plaise ou non. Toutefois cela ne signifie pas que l'on peut se passer d'entendre la voix de l'enfant; on entend bien la voix des adultes concernés.

Le juge Hale indiqua que la réforme introduite par le règlement de Bruxelles II, qui impose d'entendre les enfants à moins que ce soit inapproprié, devrait conduire à entendre les enfants plus souvent qu'auparavant dans le cadre de la Convention de La Haye. Se demandant quel effet donner à ce nouveau principe, elle affirma qu'il n'était pas suffisant de dire que le parent rapteur ferait valoir la position de l'enfant.

En Angleterre il conviendrait qu'un travailleur judiciaire entende l'enfant, bien que celui-ci puisse aussi être auditionné par le juge s'il le demande. Toutefois, s'il semblait probable que la voix et l'intérêt de l'enfant ne soient pas bien présentés au juge, en particulier en présence de certains arguments que les adultes ne faisaient pas valoir, il convenait que l'enfant soit représenté de manière indépendante à la procédure.

Elle estima que des problèmes de retard ne se poseraient pas si l'enfant était entendu au début de la procédure et ajouta qu'il n'y avait aucune raison d'étendre l'approche communautaire à tous les cas d'enlèvement d'enfant.

Lord Carswell indiqua qu'il convenait de ne pas remettre en cause trop rapidement la décisoin des juridictions inférieures de ne pas autoriser l'enfant à faire l'objet d'une représentation séparée. Il ajouta qu'il était nécessaire d'être prudent dans le cadre de l'évaluation du poid à attacher à la volonté d'nu enfant de 7 ans, qui peut mal comprendre la situation et n'avoir qu'un sens limité de son intérêt supérieur. Toutefois il estima que les juges doivent prendre en compte les facteurs cités par le juge Hale au soutien de l'audition des enfants.

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)

Bien que ce point soit sans incidence sur l'issue de l'affaire, plusieurs juges se prononcèrent sur l'application de l'article 13 alinéa 2. Le juge Hale, suivie par les juges Hope et Brown, observa que les enfants étaient capables d'être des acteurs à part entière. De même que les adultes, les enfants doivent parfois se conformer à des decisions judiciaires, que cela leur plaise ou non. Toutefois cela ne signifie pas que l'on peut se passer d'entendre la voix de l'enfant; on entend bien la voix des adultes concernés. Le juge Hale indiqua que la réforme introduite par le règlement de Bruxelles II, qui impose d'entendre les enfants à moins que ce soit inapproprié, devrait conduire à entendre les enfants plus souvent qu'auparavant dans le cadre de la Convention de La Haye. Se demandant quel effet donner à ce nouveau principe, elle affirma qu'il n'était pas suffisant de dire que le parent rapteur ferait valoir la position de l'enfant. En Angleterre il conviendrait qu'un travailleur judiciaire entende l'enfant, bien que celui-ci puisse aussi être auditionné par le juge s'il le demande. Toutefois, s'il semblait probable que la voix et l'intérêt de l'enfant ne soient pas bien présentés au juge, en particulier en présence de certains arguments que les adultes ne faisaient pas valoir, il convenait que l'enfant soit représenté de manière indépendante à la procédure. Elle estima que des problèmes de retard ne se poseraient pas si l'enfant était entendu au début de la procédure et ajouta qu'il n'y avait aucune raison d'étendre l'approche communautaire à tous les cas d'enlèvement d'enfant. Lord Carswell indiqua qu'il convenait de ne pas remettre en cause trop rapidement la décisoin des juridictions inférieures de ne pas autoriser l'enfant à faire l'objet d'une représentation séparée. Il ajouta qu'il était nécessaire d'être prudent dans le cadre de l'évaluation du poid à attacher à la volonté d'nu enfant de 7 ans, qui peut mal comprendre la situation et n'avoir qu'un sens limité de son intérêt supérieur. Toutefois il estima que les juges doivent prendre en compte les facteurs cités par le juge Hale au soutien de l'audition des enfants.

Droits de l'homme - art. 20

Le juge Hale, suivie sur ce point par les juges Hope et Brown, observa que si l'espèce n'imposait pas qu'on envisage des arguments tirés de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme, de tels arguments pourraient être pertinents dans le cadre d'affaires relevant de la Convention de La Haye. Certes l'article 20 de la Convention n'est pas applicable au Royaume-Uni (car il n'est pas inclu dans l'instrument mettant en vigueur la Convention au Royaume-Uni, ndlr), l'adoption de la loi sur les droits de l'homme de 1998 lui donnait effet.

Droit de visite - art. 21


Le juge Hale, suivie sur ce point par les juges Hope et Brown, recommenda l'élaboration de procédures tendant à ce que la facilitation de l'exercice de droits de visite au Royaume-Uni dans le cadre de l'article 21 soit envisagée en même temps que le retour de l'enfant sur le fondement de l'article 12.

Commentaire INCADAT

Décision ou attestation selon l'article 15

Rôle et interprétation de l’article 15

L’article 15 constitue un mécanisme innovant qui traduit la coopération, élément central au fonctionnement de la Convention Enlèvement d’enfants de 1980. Cet article prévoit la possibilité pour les autorités d’un État contractant, avant de déposer une demande de retour, d’exiger que le demandeur obtienne, le cas échéant, de la part des autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant, une décision ou autre attestation constatant le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non‑retour de l’enfant au sens de l’article 3 de la Convention. Les Autorités centrales des États contractants doivent, dans la mesure du possible, aider les demandeurs à obtenir cette décision ou attestation.

Portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 aux fins d’obtention de décisions ou d’attestations

Les États de tradition de common law sont divisés quant au rôle du mécanisme de l’article 15. Ils s’interrogent en particulier quant à la nature de la décision ; le tribunal de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant doit-il statuer sur le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ou se contenter d’établir si le demandeur est bel et bien titulaire du droit de garde en vertu du droit interne ? Cette distinction est indissociable de l’interprétation autonome du droit de garde et du caractère « illicite » aux fins de la Convention, autrement dit estime-t-on que le droit de garde a été violé.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

La Cour d’appel s’est prononcée en faveur d’une position très stricte quant à la portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 :

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour a conclu qu’il était difficile d’envisager des circonstances dans lesquelles une demande aux fins de l’article 15 peut avoir une quelconque utilité, si la demande d’attestation dans l’État requis a trait à un point d’interprétation autonome de la Convention (par ex., le caractère illicite).

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 866].

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Si l’utilité et le caractère contraignant d’une décision d’un tribunal étranger portant sur l’étendue des droits du demandeur ont fait l’unanimité, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a insisté sur le fait que le tribunal étranger était bien mieux placé qu’un tribunal anglais pour comprendre les véritables signification et effet de ses propres lois aux termes de la Convention.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

Se ralliant à la décision de la Cour d’appel anglaise dans l’affaire Hunter v. Morrow, la Cour d’appel néo-zélandaise a conclu, à la majorité, qu’un tribunal saisit d’une demande de décision ou d’attestation aux fins de l’article 15 devrait se contenter de consigner les questions relevant du droit national et ne pas s’aventurer à classer le déplacement comme illicite ou non. Ce dernier point relève exclusivement de la compétence des tribunaux de l’État de refuge, compte tenu de l’interprétation autonome de la Convention.

Statut d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le statut qu’il convient d’accorder à une décision ou attestation de l’article 15 s’est également révélé source de controverse, en particulier eu égard à la nature ou non probante d’une décision étrangère eu égard à l’existence ou non du droit de garde et quant au caractère illicite.

Australie

In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

La Cour a estimé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était qu’indicative et qu’il appartenait aux tribunaux français de déterminer si le déplacement était illicite.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour d’appel a jugé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était pas probante et a réfuté les conclusions de la Haute Cour néo-zélandaise quant au caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour : M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1021]. Ce faisant, elle a indiqué que les tribunaux néo-zélandais ne reconnaissaient pas la distinction entre les droits de garde et d’accès, distinction admise au Royaume-Uni.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 866].

La Cour d’appel a refusé les conclusions des tribunaux roumains indiquant que le père ne disposait pas du droit de garde en vertu de la Convention.

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

La Chambre des Lords a conclu à l’unanimité qu’en cas de demande de décision ou d’attestation en vertu de l’article 15, la décision du tribunal étranger quant à l’étendue du droit du demandeur doit être, sauf circonstances exceptionnelles (par ex. si la décision résulte d’une fraude ou viole les principes élémentaires de justice), considérée comme probante. Il n’existait en l’espèce aucune circonstance exceptionnelle, le tribunal de première instance et la Cour d’appel ont dont commis une erreur en ne tenant pas compte de la décision de la Cour d’appel de Bucarest et en autorisant la production de nouvelles preuves.

Pour ce qui est de la détermination des droits du parent, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a estimé que le tribunal de l’État requis pouvait refuser de s’y conformer, uniquement lorsque cette détermination est clairement contraire à l’interprétation internationale de la Convention, comme cela a pu être le cas dans l’affaire Hunter v. Murrow. Pour sa part, Lord Brown a jugé que la détermination des droits et du caractère illicite devait, en toutes circonstances, être jugée probante.

Suisse

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953].

La Cour suprême suisse a jugé qu’une conclusion quant au droit de garde serait, en principe, contraignante pour les autorités de l’État requis. Pour ce qui est des décisions ou attestations de l’article 15, la Cour a indiqué que les avis parmi les commentateurs étaient partagés quant à leurs effets et a refusé de se prononcer sur la question.

Conséquences pratiques d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le recours au mécanisme de l’article 15 provoquera inéluctablement des retards dans le cadre de la demande de retour, en particulier lorsque la décision ou attestation d’origine fait l’objet d’un appel interjeté par les autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle. Voir par exemple :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Cette réalité pratique a à son tour généré une grande quantité d’opinions de juges.

L’affaire Re D. a suscité de nombreuses opinions. Lord Carswell a affirmé qu’il conviendrait de limiter au minimum le recours à cette procédure. Lord Brown a indiqué qu’un tel mécanisme ne serait utilisé qu’à de rares occasions. Lord Hope a conseillé d’éviter de rechercher la perfection dans l’examen du caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ; il conviendrait selon lui d’établir un juste milieu entre le fait d’agir sur base d’informations trop faibles et d’en solliciter trop. La Baronne Hale a indiqué qu’en cas d’adhésion récente d’un État à la Convention, l’article 15 pouvait, en cas de doute, s’avérer utile aux fins d’obtention d’une décision contraignante sur le contenu et les effets du droit local.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

La Cour d’appel a, à la majorité, estimé que les demandes au titre de l’article 15 ne devraient être utilisées que très rarement entre l’Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande, compte tenu de la similarité de ces deux ordres juridiques.

Solutions alternatives à une demande aux fins de l’article 15

Dans les cas où les tribunaux souhaitent simplement établir quel est le droit étranger à la lumière des informations disponibles, le recours à un expert en la matière peut apparaître comme une solution de rechange. L’expérience en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles a montré que cette méthode est loin d’être infaillible et qu’elle ne permet pas toujours de gagner du temps, voir :

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1020].

Dans ce dernier cas, le juge Thorpe a émis l’avis que l’on pourrait plus souvent recourir au Réseau judiciaire européen, par l’intermédiaire du Bureau international du droit de la famille au sein de la Royal Courts of Justice. Des conseils pratiques pourraient ainsi être émis quant à la meilleure marche à suivre dans un cas particulier : recourir conjointement à un unique expert ; solliciter une décision ou attestation en vertu de l’article 15 ; solliciter l’opinion d’un juge de liaison concernant le droit de son État, opinion qui ne serait pas contraignante mais qui pourrait aider les parties et le tribunal à distinguer le poids des arguments ou des intentions dans la contestation de la faculté du plaignant à remplir les conditions établies à l’article 3.

Résidence habituelle

L'interprétation de la notion centrale de résidence habituelle (préambule, art. 3 et 4) s'est révélée particulièrement problématique ces dernières années, des divergences apparaissant dans divers États contractants. Une approche uniforme fait défaut quant à la question de savoir ce qui doit être au cœur de l'analyse : l'enfant seul, l'enfant ainsi que l'intention des personnes disposant de sa garde, ou simplement l'intention de ces personnes. En conséquence notamment de cette différence d'approche, la notion de résidence peut apparaître comme un élément de rattachement très flexible dans certains États contractants ou un facteur de rattachement plus rigide et représentatif d'une résidence à long terme dans d'autres.

L'analyse du concept de résidence habituelle est par ailleurs compliquée par le fait que les décisions concernent des situations factuelles très diverses. La question de la résidence habituelle peut se poser à l'occasion d'un déménagement permanent à l'étranger, d'un déménagement consistant en un test d'une durée illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée ou simplement d'un séjour à l'étranger de durée déterminée.

Tendances générales:

La jurisprudence des cours d'appel fédérales américaines illustre la grande variété d'interprétations données au concept de résidence habituelle.
Approche centrée sur l'enfant

La cour d'appel fédérale des États-Unis d'Amérique du 6e ressort s'est prononcée fermement en faveur d'une approche centrée sur l'enfant seul :

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 935]

Voir aussi :

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 221].

Approche combinée des liens de l'enfant et de l'intention parentale

Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis d'Amérique des 3e et 8e ressorts ont privilégié une méthode où les liens de l'enfant avec le pays ont été lus à la lumière de l'intention parentale conjointe.
Le jugement de référence est le suivant : Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 83].

Voir aussi :

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 530] ;

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Dans cette dernière espèce, une distinction a été pratiquée entre la situation d'enfants très jeunes (où une importance plus grande est attachée à l'intention des parents - voir par exemple : Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 808]) et celle d'enfants plus âgés pour lesquels l'intention parentale joue un rôle plus limité.

Approche centrée sur l'intention parentale

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel fédérale du 9e ressort a rendu une décision dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301], qui s'est révélée très influente en exigeant la présence d'une intention ferme d'abandonner une résidence préexistante pour qu'un enfant puisse acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle.

Cette interprétation a été reprise et précisée par d'autres décisions rendues en appel par des juridictions fédérales de sorte qu'en l'absence d'intention commune des parents en cas de départ pour l'étranger, la résidence habituelle a été maintenue dans le pays d'origine, alors même que l'enfant a passé une période longue à l'étranger.  Voir par exemple :

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 777] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour prévu de 4 ans en Allemagne ;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 780] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 32 mois au Mexique ;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT : HC/E/USf 482] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 27 mois en Grèce.

La décision rendue dans l'affaire Mozes a également été approuvée par les cours fédérales d'appel du 2e et du 7e ressort :

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 776] ;

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 878] ;

Il convient de noter que dans l'affaire Mozes, la Cour a reconnu que si suffisamment de temps s'est écoulé et que l'enfant a vécu une expérience positive, la vie de l'enfant peut être si fermement attachée à son nouveau milieu qu'une nouvelle résidence habituelle doit pouvoir y être acquise nonobstant l'intention parentale contraire.

Autres États contractants

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position a évolué :

Autriche
La Cour suprême d'Autriche a décidé qu'une résidence de plus de six mois dans un État sera généralement caractérisée de résidence habituelle, quand bien même elle aurait lieu contre la volonté du gardien de l'enfant (puisqu'il s'agit d'une détermination factuelle du centre de vie).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
Au Québec, au contraire, l'approche est centrée sur l'enfant :
Dans Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 651], la Cour d'appel de Montréal a décidé que la résidence habituelle d'un enfant est simplement une question de fait qui doit s'apprécier à la lumière de toutes les circonstances particulières de l'espèce en fonction de la réalité vécue par l'enfant en question, et non celle de ses parents. Le séjour doit être d'une durée non négligeable (nécessaire au développement de liens par l'enfant et à son intégration dans son nouveau milieu) et continue, aussi l'enfant doit-il avoir un lien réel et actif avec sa résidence; cependant, aucune durée minimale ne peut être formulée.

Allemagne
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort également de la jurisprudence allemande :

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale a ainsi admis qu'une résidence habituelle puisse être acquise bien que l'enfant ait été illicitement déplacé dans le nouvel État de résidence :

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

La Cour constitutionnelle a confirmé l'analyse de la Cour régionale d'appel selon laquelle les enfants avaient acquis leur résidence habituelle en France malgré la nature de leur déplacement là-bas. La Cour a en effet considéré  que la résidence habituelle était un concept factuel, et les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur milieu local pendant les neuf mois qu'ils y avaient vécu.

Israël
Des approches alternatives ont été adoptées lors de la détermination de la résidence habituelle. Il est arrivé qu'un poids important ait été accordé à l'intention parentale. Voir :

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865] ;

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

Cependant, il a parfois été fait référence à une approche plus centrée sur l'enfant. Voir :

décision de la Cour suprême dans C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241 ;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 922].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Contrairement à l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Mozes, la cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Zélande a expressément rejeté l'idée que pour acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, il convient d'avoir l'intention ferme de renoncer à la résidence habituelle précédente. Voir :

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suisse
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort de la jurisprudence suisse :

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Royaume-Uni
L'approche standard est de considérer conjointement la ferme intention des personnes ayant la charge de l'enfant et la réalité vécue par l'enfant.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Pour un commentaire doctrinal des différentes approches du concept de résidence habituelle dans les pays de common law. Voir :

R. Schuz, « Habitual Residence of  Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice », Child and Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 13, No1, 2001, p.1 ;

R. Schuz, « Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context » Journal of Transnational Law and Policy, Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Nature limitée des exceptions

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Sauvegarde des droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - article 13(2)

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - ARTICLE 13(2)

On constate une absence d'uniformité dans les États de langue anglaise quant à la question de la représentation autonome des enfants à la procédure. 

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans des décisions anciennes rendues par la Cour d'appel on considérait qu'étant donné le caractère sommaire de la procédure relative à la Convention, une représentation séparée des enfants en cause ne devait être admise que dans des cas exceptionnels.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 56] ;

Position reprise dans :

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881] ;

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905].

Le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles fut admis dans les affaires suivantes :

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 57] ;

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 180] ;

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 168] ;

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 579] ;

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 829] ;

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 964].

Dans Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881]; le juge Thorpe L.J. estima que les exigences avaient été rendues plus strictes par le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis, dans la mesure où elles concernaient les demandes relatives au statut des parties.

Cette position fut rejetée par le juge Hale :

Sans toutefois remettre en cause le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles, le juge Hale de la Chambre des Lords signala dans l'affaire Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] la nécessité de revoir la manière dont la position des enfants en cause est recherchée, à la lumière des exigences du nouveau régime communautaire de l'enlèvement d'enfants. En particulier elle souligna l'importance de rechercher si l'enfant s'oppose à son retour dès le début de la procédure afin d'éviter des retards.

Dans Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905] le juge Thorpe L.J. reconnut que le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis ne rendait pas plus strictes les exigences en matière de statut des parties ; il rejeta également l'idée que Re D. assouplissait ces exigences.

Toutefois, dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @937@] le juge Hale intervint de nouveau dans ce débat pour affirmer qu'un juge de la mise en état devait évaluer si une représentation autonome de l'enfant était de nature à permettre à la cour de gagner tant en compréhension que cela pourrait justifier l'intrusion, le retard et le coût qu'un tel statut entraînerait. Une telle approche semble suggérer un critère plus flexible, cependant elle ajouta également que les enfants ne doivent pas avoir une impression exagérée de l'importance et de la pertinence de leur opinion, précisant qu'en général, ceux-ci ne devraient pas intervenir en tant que parties. 

Australie
La cour suprême d'Australie a tenté de se départir du critère des circonstances exceptionnelles dans l'affaire De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93].

Toutefois, l'exigence de circonstances exceptionnelles fut rétablie par le législateur dans le cadre d'une réforme du droit de la famille en 2000. Voir : Family Law Amendment Act 2000, et Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

Voir:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
En France, les enfants entendus dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) peuvent être assistés d'un avocat (art 338-5 NCPC et art 388-1 Code Civil - cette dernière disposition précise cependant que l'audition assistée d'un avocat ne leur confère pas le statut de partie à la procédure). Voir :

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 853].

En Écosse et en Nouvelle-Zélande, on constate que les tribunaux admettent plus facilement qu'un enfant soit représenté séparément à la procédure. Voir par exemple :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @962@];

M Petitioner 2005 SLT 2, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 508];

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S v. L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 532].

Sources du droit de garde

Analyse de la jurisprudence de INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Jurisprudence du Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles

La Cour d'appel anglaise a adopté une position très stricte quant à l'exception du risque grave de l'article 13(1) b) et il est rare qu'elle considère cette disposition applicable. Parmi les décisions ayant refusé d'ordonner le retour, voir :

Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 8] ;

Re M. (Abduction: Psychological Harm) [1997] 2 FLR 690, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 86] ;

Re M. (Abduction: Leave to Appeal) [1999] 2 FLR 550, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 263] ;

Re D. (Article 13B: Non-return) [2006] EWCA Civ 146, [2006] 2 FLR 305, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 818] ;

Klentzeris v. Klentzeris [2007] EWCA Civ 533, [2007] 2 FLR 996  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 931].

Qui peut obtenir le droit de garde au sens de la Convention?

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.