CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Auto Audiencia Provincial Nº 133/2006 Pontevedra (Sección 1ª), Recurso de apelación Nº 473/2006

INCADAT reference

HC/E/ES 887

Court

Country

SPAIN

Name

Audiencia Provincial de Pontevedra, Sección 1ª

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Almenar Belenguer, Manuel, Rodríguez González, María Begoña, Menéndez Estébanez, Francisco Javier

States involved

Requesting State

FRANCE

Requested State

SPAIN

Decision

Date

7 May 2006

Status

Final

Grounds

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12 | Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2) | Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2) | Procedural Matters

Order

Appeal dismissed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

3 12 13(1)(b) 13(2) 16

HC article(s) Relied Upon

12 13(1)(b) 13(2)

Other provisions
Art 11 of the Brussels II a Regulation (Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 of 27 November 2003)
Authorities | Cases referred to

-

Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
Actual Exercise

Exceptions to Return

Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection
Parental Influence on the Views of Children

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The boy, a French national, was born on 28 February 1992. The parents divorced in 1998 and because of the harm the boy had suffered during the marriage he was placed in the care of a public institution in Paris.

The decision to keep the child in care was continued for a year on 14 March 2002 by a court of first instance in Bobigny. This decision was upheld by the Paris Court of Appeal on 17 September 2002. The parents were each granted a right of access to the child.

In the summer of 2002 the parents were to share access, the mother having access for the first half of the vacation, the father for the second half. On 6 August the mother failed to give the child to the father and on 3 September she failed to return the child to the institution for the start of the school year. At some date during the summer vacation the mother took the child to Spain.

On 14 January 2003 proceedings were started in Spain for the return of the child at request of the father and the French public institution. A court was seised in Barcelona but this court temporarily set aside the case on 10 September 2004 when the location of the mother and the child could not be determined.

The mother was arrested in Vigo on 1 October 2005, and the boy was taken into care. A court of first instance at Pontevedra ordered the return of the child on 10 May 2006. The mother appealed this order.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and return ordered; the removal was wrongful and none of the exceptions had been proved to the standard required by the Convention.

Grounds

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12

The court noted that a year had not elapsed between the date of the wrongful removal in August 2002 and the commencement of return proceedings in January 2003. Consequently a prompt return was still to be made. The Court further rejected arguments that the child had become settled in his new environment during the four years he had spent in the country, noting that he had been under the care of the Spanish social services for part of that time.

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

The court found that the removal of the child in August 2002 was wrongful. It was irrelevant that the French public institution which had custody of the child did not have physical care at the moment of the removal for it was still effectively exercising custody on that date.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The Court noted there was no proof to substantiate the allegations that a return would expose the child to a grave risk of psychological or physical harm. The Court further noted that pursuant to Article 11(4) of Council Regulation 2201/2003 the grave risk of harm exception could not be upheld if it was proved that adequate measures had been taken to guarantee the protection of the child after his return. In this the fact the French authorities had previously taken the boy into care was a sufficient guarantee of his future protection.

Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

The boy, who was aged 14, stated that he did not wish to return to France or to have a relationship with his father. Whilst the Court acknowledged these objections it also noted that the boy had been subjected to undue influence by the mother.

Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2)

The court noted that a year had not elapsed between the date of the wrongful removal in August 2002 and the commencement of return proceedings in January 2003. Consequently a prompt return was still to be made. The Court further rejected arguments that the child had become settled in his new environment during the four years he had spent in the country, noting that he had been under the care of the Spanish social services for part of that time.

Procedural Matters

The mother was ordered to pay the costs of the procedure and the expenses associated with the return of the child.

INCADAT comment

Actual Exercise

Courts in a variety of Contracting States have afforded a wide interpretation to what amounts to the actual exercise of rights of custody, see:

Australia
Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 68];

Austria
8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof, 30/10/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 548];

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 545];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. Cour d'Appel at Aix en Provence (6e Ch.) 23 March 1989, 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529 note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° 5704759 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 704];

CA Aix en Provence 8/10/2002, L. v. Ministère Public, Mme B et Mesdemoiselles L (N° de rôle 02/14917) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 509];

Germany
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 822];

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 491];

New Zealand
The Chief Executive of the Department for Courts for R. v. P., 20 September 1999, Court of Appeal of New Zealand [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 304];

United Kingdom - Scotland
O. v. O. 2002 SC 430 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 507].

In the above case the Court of Session stated that it might be going too far to suggest, as the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit had done in Friedrich v Friedrich that only clear and unequivocal acts of abandonment might constitute failure to exercise custody rights. However, Friedrich was fully approved of in a later Court of Session judgment, see:

S. v S., 2003 SLT 344 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 577].

This interpretation was confirmed by the Inner House of the Court of Session (appellate court) in:

AJ. V. FJ. 2005 CSIH 36, 2005 1 S.C. 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803].

Switzerland
K. v. K., Tribunal cantonal de Horgen [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CZ 299];

449/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 433];

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953];

United States of America
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 82];

Sealed Appellant v. Sealed Appellee, 394 F.3d 338 (5th Cir. 2004), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 779];

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

See generally Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E., 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 84 et seq.

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Parental Influence on the Views of Children

Courts applying Article 13(2) have recognised that it is essential to determine whether the objections of the child concerned have been influenced by the abducting parent. 

Courts in a variety of Contracting States have dismissed claims under Article 13(2) where it is apparent that the child is not expressing personally formed views, see in particular:

Australia
Director General of the Department of Community Services v. N., 19 August 1994, transcript, Family Court of Australia (Sydney) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 231];

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 754];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 87].

Although not at issue in the case, the Court of Appeal affirmed that little or no weight should be given to objections if the child had been influenced by the abducting parent or some other person.

Finland
Court of Appeal of Helsinki: No. 2933 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FI 863];

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947].
 
The Court of Appeal of Bordeaux limited the weight to be placed on the objections of the children on the basis that before being interviewed they had had no contact with the applicant parent and had spent a long period of time with the abducting parent. Moreover the allegations of the children had already been considered by the authorities in the children's State of habitual residence.

Germany
4 UF 223/98, Oberlandesgericht Düsseldorf, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 820];

Hungary
Mezei v. Bíró 23.P.500023/98/5. (27. 03. 1998, Central District Court of Budapest; First Instance); 50.Pkf.23.732/1998/2. 16. 06. 1998., (Capital Court as Appellate Court) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HU 329];

Israel
Appl. App. Dist. Ct. 672/06, Supreme Court 15 October 2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 885];

United Kingdom - Scotland
A.Q. v. J.Q., 12 December 2001, transcript, Outer House of the Court of Session (Scotland) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 415];

Spain
Auto Audiencia Provincial Nº 133/2006 Pontevedra (Sección 1ª), Recurso de apelación Nº 473/2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 887];

Restitución de Menores 534/1997 AA [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 908].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has held that the views of children could never be entirely independent; therefore a distinction had to be made between a manipulated objection and an objection, which whilst not entirely autonomous, nevertheless merited consideration, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795].

United States of America
Robinson v. Robinson, 983 F. Supp. 1339 (D. Colo. 1997) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 128].

In this case the District Court held that it would be unrealistic to expect a caring parent not to influence the child's preference to some extent, therefore the issue to be ascertained was whether the influence was undue.

It has been held in two cases that evidence of parental influence should not be accepted as a justification for not ascertaining the views of children who would otherwise be heard, see:

Germany
2 BvR 1206/98, Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal Constitutional Court) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 233];

New Zealand
Winters v. Cowen [2002] NZFLR 927 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 473].

Equally parental influence may not have a material impact on the child's views, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

The Court of Appeal did not dismiss the suggestion that the child's views may have been influenced or coloured by immersion in an atmosphere of hostility towards the applicant father, but it was not prepared to give much weight to such suggestions.

In an Israeli case the court found that the child had been brainwashed by his mother and held that his views should therefore be given little weight. Nevertheless, the Court also held that the extreme nature of the child's reactions to the proposed return, which included the threat of suicide, could not be ignored.  The court concluded that the child would face a grave risk of harm if sent back, see:

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 834].

Faits

L'enfant, un petit garçon français, était né en février 1992. Ses parents divorcèrent en 1998. Etant donné les abus dont il avait souffert pendant la durée du mariage, l'enfant fut alors placé dans une institution parisienne.

La décision de l'y laisser encore un an fut prise par un tribunal de Bobigny en mars 2002. Cette décision fut confimée par la cour d'appel le 17 septembre 2002, les parents obtenant un droit de visite.

Pendant l'été 2002, il était prévu que les parents auraient un droit de visite successif; la mère ayant l'enfant la première moitié des vacances et le père la seconde moitié. Le 6 août, la mère ne donna pas l'enfant au père et le 3 septembre, elle ne ramena pas non plus l'enfant dans son centre pour le début de l'année scolaire. Elle avait emmené l'enfant en Espagne à un moment des vacances.

Le 14 janvier 2003, le père et l'institution française entamèrent en Espagne une procédure de retour. Un tribunal de Barcelone fut saisi mais il suspendit la procédure le 6 septembre 2004 car l'enfant n'avait pu être localisé. Le 1er octobre 2005, la mère fut arrêtée à Vigo et l'enfant placé dans une institution.

Le 10 mai 2006, un tribunal de première instance de Pontevedra ordonna le retour de l'enfant. La mère forma appel.

Dispositif

Appel rejeté et retour ordonné. Le déplacement était illicite mais aucune des exceptions conventionnelles n'était applicable.

Motifs

Déplacement et non-retour - art. 3 et 12

La cour observa qu'une année ne s'était pas écoulée entre le moment du déplacement illicite en août 2002 et le début de la procédure de retour en janvier 2003. Il était donc toujours possible de prononcer une décision de retour. La Cour rejeta l'argument selon lequel l'enfant s'était intégra dans son nouveau milieu pendant les 4 ans passés en Espagne, au motif qu'il avait été placé en institution en Espagne pendant une partie de cette période.

Droit de garde - art. 3

La Cour estima que le déplacement de l'enfant en aôut 2002 était illicite. Le fait que institution publique française ayant la garde n'avait pas la garde physique de l'enfant au moment du déplacement était sans pertinence car le droit de garde était tout de même exercé effectivement à cette date.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

La Cour observa qu'aucune preuve n'avait été rapportée au soutien de l'allégation selon laquelle le retour de l'enfant l'exposerait à un risque grave de danger psychologique ou physique. La Cour ajouta qu'en application de l'article 11 alinéa 4 du règlement de Bruxelles II, l'exception du risque grave ne pouvait être admise s'il était établi que des mesures de protection adéquates de l'enfant pouvaient être prises après son retour. Le fait que les autorités françaises avaient ordonné le placement de l'enfant en institution par le passé était une garantie suffisante de la protection dont il bénéficierait dans le futur.

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)

L'enfant, âgé de 14 ans, indiqua qu'il ne souhaitait pas retourner en France ni avoir de contact avec son père. Bien que la Cour reconnût cette opposition, elle indiqua que l'enfant avait été indûment influencé par sa mère.

Intégration de l'enfant - art. 12(2)

La cour observa qu'une année ne s'était pas écoulée entre le moment du déplacement illicite en août 2002 et le début de la procédure de retour en janvier 2003. Il était donc toujours possible de prononcer une décision de retour. La Cour rejeta l'argument selon lequel l'enfant s'était intégra dans son nouveau milieu pendant les 4 ans passés en Espagne, au motif qu'il avait été placé en institution en Espagne pendant une partie de cette période.

Questions procédurales

La mère fut condamnée aux frais et dépens, ainsi qu'à la prise en charge financière des frais liés au retour de l'enfant.

Commentaire INCADAT

Exercice effectif de la garde

Les juridictions d'une quantité d'États parties ont également privilégié une interprétation large de la notion d'exercice effectif de la garde. Voir :

Australie
Director General, Department of Community Services Central Authority v. J.C. and J.C. and T.C. (1996) FLC 92-717 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 68] ;

Autriche
8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof, 30/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548] ;

Belgique
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/BE 545] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [1996] 1 FCR 46, [1995] Fam Law 351 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 37] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. Cour d'Appel d'Aix en Provence (6e Ch.) 23 Mars 1989, 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529 note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704] ;

CA Aix en Provence 8/10/2002, L. v. Ministère Public, Mme B et Mesdemoiselles L (N° de rôle 02/14917) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 509] ;

Allemagne
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 822] ;

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 491] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
The Chief Executive of the Department for Courts for R. v. P., 20 September 1999, Court of Appeal of New Zealand [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 304] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
O. v. O. 2002 SC 430 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 507].

Dans cette décision, la « Court of Session », Cour suprême écossaise, estima que ce serait peut-être aller trop loin que de suggérer, comme les juges américains dans l'affaire Friedrich v. Friedrich, que seuls des actes d'abandon clairs et dénués d'ambiguïté pouvaient être interprétés comme impliquant que le droit de garde n'était pas exercé effectivement. Toutefois, « Friedrich » fut approuvée dans une affaire écossaise subséquente:

S. v. S., 2003 SLT 344 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 577].

Cette interprétation fut confirmée par la cour d'appel d'Écosse :

A.J. v. F.J. 2005 CSIH 36 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Suisse
K. v. K., 13 février 1992, Tribunal cantonal de Horgen [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/SZ 299] ;

449/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433];

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Friedrich v. Friedrich 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 82] ;

Sealed Appellant v. Sealed Appellee, 15 December 2004, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 779] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029].

Sur cette question, voir : P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, Oxford, 1999 p. 84 et seq.

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Influence parentale sur l'opinion de l'enfant

Les juridictions appliquant l'article 13(2) ont reconnu qu'il était essentiel de définir si l'opposition de l'enfant au retour avait été influencée par le parent ravisseur.

Les juges de nombreux États contractants ont rejeté les arguments fondés sur l'article 13(2) lorsqu'il était clair que l'enfant n'exprimait pas une opinion indépendante.

Voir notamment :

Australie
Director General of the Department of Community Services v. N., 19 août 1994, transcription, Family Court of Australia (Sydney), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 231] ;

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 754] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 87].

Bien que la question ne se soit pas posée en l'espèce, la Cour d'appel a affirmé que peu ou pas de poids devait être accordé à l'opposition d'un enfant si celui-ci a été influencé par le parent ravisseur ou toute autre personne.

Finlande
Cour d'appel d'Helsinki: No. 2933, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 863].

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947].

Une juridiction d'appel modéra la force probante de l'opposition au motif que les enfants avaient vécu longuement avec le parent ravisseur et sans contact avec le parent victime avant d'être entendus, observant également que les faits dénoncés par les enfants avaient par ailleurs été pris en compte par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle.

Allemagne
4 UF 223/98, Oberlandesgericht Düsseldorf, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 820] ;

Hongrie
Mezei v. Bíró 23.P.500023/98/5. (27. 03. 1998, Central District Court of Budapest; First Instance); 50.Pkf.23.732/1998/2. 16. 06. 1998., (Capital Court as Appellate Court) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HU 329] ;

Israël
Appl. App. Dist. Ct. 672/06, Supreme Court 15 October 2006 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 885] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
A.Q. v. J.Q., 12 December 2001, transcript, Outer House of the Court of Session (Scotland) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 415] ;

Espagne
Auto Audiencia Provincial Nº 133/2006 Pontevedra (Sección 1ª), Recurso de apelación Nº 473/2006 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 887] ;

Restitución de Menores 534/1997 AA [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 908].

Suisse
Le Tribunal fédéral suisse a estimé que l'opposition des enfants ne pouvait jamais être entièrement indépendante. Dès lors il convenait de distinguer selon que l'enfant avait ou non été manipulé. Voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Robinson v. Robinson, 983 F. Supp. 1339 (D. Colo. 1997), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 128].

Dans cette espèce, la District Court estima qu'il ne serait pas réaliste de prétendre qu'un parent aimant n'influence pas la préférence de l'enfant dans une certaine mesure de sorte que la question de savoir si l'un des parents a indûment influencé l'enfant ne devrait pas se poser.

Toutefois il a été décidé dans deux affaires que la preuve de l'influence parentale ne devrait pas empêcher l'audition d'un enfant. Voir :

Allemagne
2 BvR 1206/98, Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal Constitutional Court),[Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 233] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
Winters v. Cowen [2002] NZFLR 927, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 473].

Il se peut également que l'influence d'un parent n'ait que peu d'effet sur la position de l'enfant. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

La Cour d'appel ne rejeta pas la suggestion selon laquelle l'opinion de l'enfant avait été influencée ou que celui-ci avait été entraîné à penser d'une certaine façon du fait de son immersion dans une atmosphère hostile au père, mais n'y accorda que peu d'importance.

Dans une affaire israélienne, le juge estima que l'enfant avait subi un véritable lavage de cerveau de la part de la mère de sorte que son opinion ne devait pas être prise au sérieux. Toutefois le juge considéra que la nature extrême des réactions de l'enfant interrogé sur un possible retour (menace de suicide) était telle que son opinion ne pouvait être ignorée. Le juge estima dans ce cas que le retour exposerait l'enfant à un risque grave de danger. Voir :

Family Appeal 1169/99 R. v. L. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 834].