CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Bekier v. Bekier, 248 F.3d 1051 (11th Cir. 2001)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/USf 909

Court

Country

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Name

United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit

Level

Appellate Court

States involved

Requesting State

ISRAEL

Requested State

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Decision

Date

16 April 2001

Status

Final

Grounds

Issues Relating to Return

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

-

HC article(s) Relied Upon

-

Other provisions
US jurisdictional doctrine of mootness
Authorities | Cases referred to
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998); Mahmoud v. Mahmoud, 1997 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 2158, No. 96-4165 (E.D.N.Y. Jan. 24, 1997) (unpublished); Walsh v. Walsh, 221 F.3d 204, (1st Cir. 2000).
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Implementation & Application Issues

Procedural Matters
Enforcement of Return Orders

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to a child born in France in the early 1990s. In 1994 the parents divorced and a French court awarded the parents joint legal custody but the father care of the child.

The mother subsequently allowed the father to take the child to Israel in July 1994 for a temporary stay. Although the father's passport only permitted entry until November 1994 he sought permanent residency. The mother during a visit agreed to postpone the French custody proceedings.

The father then petitioned for and was awarded custody from the Rabbinical Court of Tel Aviv. On 2 March 1995 the mother removed the child, first to France and then the United States. In 1999 when the father located the mother he issued return proceedings in the United States. In 1999 the US District Court for the Southern District of Florida ordered the return of the child.

On 26 August the Court granted a conditional stay, ordering the child to stay in the locality of the Court, if the mother filed an appeal within 10 days and posted a bond of $100,000. The mother duly filed an appeal but failed to post the bond. In October 1999 the father returned to Israel with the child.

Ruling

Application to appeal dismissed and return order upheld. The prior return of the child rendered an appeal moot.

Grounds

Issues Relating to Return

Mootness Doctrine The Court noted that the mother’s failure to post the bond had caused the temporary stay to expire after 10 days. Consequently the father had been free to leave with the child after that time. The Court held that it was material in deciding whether it had jurisdiction to hear the appeal, that the father had left without wilfully violating an order of the District Court. Although both sides argued that the appeal was not moot, the Court found that it was, since no controversy existed for it to resolve and none of the exceptions to the mootness doctrine applied. The Court affirmed that the mother’s remedies now lay in the Israeli courts and that any ruling it would make would be merely advisory.

INCADAT comment

Enforcement of Return Orders

Where an abducting parent does not comply voluntarily the implementation of a return order will require coercive measures to be taken.  The introduction of such measures may give rise to legal and practical difficulties for the applicant.  Indeed, even where ultimately successful significant delays may result before the child's future can be adjudicated upon in the State of habitual residence.  In some extreme cases the delays encountered may be of such length that it may no longer be appropriate for a return order to be made.


Work of the Hague Conference

Considerable attention has been paid to the issue of enforcement at the Special Commissions convened to review the operation of the Hague Convention.

In the Conclusions of the Fourth Review Special Commission in March 2001 it was noted:

"Methods and speed of enforcement

3.9        Delays in enforcement of return orders, or their non-enforcement, in certain Contracting States are matters of serious concern. The Special Commission calls upon Contracting States to enforce return orders promptly and effectively.

3.10        It should be made possible for courts, when making return orders, to include provisions to ensure that the order leads to the prompt and effective return of the child.

3.11        Efforts should be made by Central Authorities, or by other competent authorities, to track the outcome of return orders and to determine in each case whether enforcement is delayed or not achieved."

See: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" and "Conclusions and Recommendations".

In preparation for the Fifth Review Special Commission in November 2006 the Permanent Bureau prepared a report entitled: "Enforcement of Orders Made Under the 1980 Convention - Towards Principles of Good Practice", Prel. Doc. No 7 of October 2006, (available on the Hague Conference website at < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Preliminary Documents").

The 2006 Special Commission encouraged support for the principles of good practice set out in the report which will serve moreover as a future Guide to Good Practice on Enforcement Issues, see: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Conclusions and Recommendations" then "Special Commission of October-November 2006"


European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

The ECrtHR has in recent years paid particular attention to the issue of the enforcement of return orders under the Hague Convention.  On several occasions it has found Contracting States to the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention have failed in their positive obligations to take all the measures that could reasonably be expected to enforce a return order.  This failure has in turn led to a breach of the applicant parent's right to respect for their family life, as guaranteed by Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), see:

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, No. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 336];

Sylvester v. Austria, Nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, (2003) 37 E.H.R.R. 17, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 502];

H.N. v. Poland, No. 77710/01, (2005) 45 EHRR 1054, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 811];

Karadžic v. Croatia, No. 35030/04, (2005) 44 EHRR 896, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 819];

P.P. v. Poland, No. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 941].

The Court will have regard to the circumstances of the case and the action taken by the national authorities.  A delay of 8 months between the delivery of a return order and enforcement was held not to have constituted a breach of the left behind parent's right to family life in:

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, No. 54429/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 859].

The Court has dismissed challenges by parents who have argued that enforcement measures, including coercive steps, have interfered with their right to a family life, see:

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, No. 4783/03, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 860];

A.B. v. Poland, No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 943];

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No. 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 942].

The positive obligation to act when faced with the enforcement of a custody order in a non-Hague Convention child abduction case was upheld in:

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 898].

However, where an applicant parent has contributed to delay this will be a relevant consideration, see as regards the enforcement of a custody order following upon an abduction:

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1015].


Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact), see:

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].


Case Law on Enforcement

The following are examples of cases where a return order was made but enforcement was resisted:

Belgium
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 750];

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 915];

Switzerland
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 433];

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 423];

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 786];

5P.115/2006/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 840].

Enforcement may equally be rendered impossible because of the reaction of the children concerned, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 420];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 112];

Spain
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 899].


Enforcement of Return Orders Pending Appeal

For examples of cases where return orders have been enforced notwithstanding an appeal being pending see:

Argentina
Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n° 11/00 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact).

Spain
Sentencia nº 120/2002 (Sala Primera); Número de Registro 129/1999. Recurso de amparo [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 907];

United States of America
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491 (4th Cir. Va., 2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494].

In Miller v. Miller, 240 F.3d 392 (4th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 461] while it is not clear whether the petition was lodged prior to the return being executed, the appeal was nevertheless allowed to proceed.

However, in Bekier v. Bekier, 248 F.3d 1051 (11th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 909] an appeal was not allowed to proceed once the child was returned to the State of habitual residence.

In the European Union where following the entry into force of the Brussels IIa Regulation there is now an obligation that abductions cases be dealt with in a six week time frame, the European Commission has suggested that to guarantee compliance return orders might be enforced pending appeal, see Practice Guide for the application of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003.

Faits

La demande concernait un enfant né en France au début des années 1990. Les parents avaient divorcé en 1994 et une juridiction française avait prononcé la garde conjointe de l'enfant, le père disposant de la résidence et la mère d'un droit de visite.

La mère avait ensuite autorisé le père à emmener l'enfant en Israël pour un séjour temporaire. Bien que le passeport du père ne lui permettait de rester dans cet Etat que jusqu'en novembre 1994, il fit une demande de permis de séjour permanent. A l'occasion d'une visite, la mère accepta de retarder la procédure de garde en France.

Le père demanda ensuite la garde de l'enfant devant les instances rabbiniques, qui la lui accordèrent. Le 2 mars 1995, la mère déplaça l'enfant; d'abord en France puis aux Etats-Unis. Le père parvint à localiser la mère en 1999 et entama une procédure en vue du retour de l'enfant. En 1999, la cour du canton méridional de Floride ordonna le retour de l'enfant.

Le 26 août la cour décida de suspendre la procédure et ordonna que l'enfant reste dans ce ressort à la condition que la mère forma appel de l'ordonnance de retour dans les 10 jours et dépose une garantie de 100 000 dollars. La mère fit appel mais ne déposa pas la somme en garantie. En octobre 1999, le père rentra en Israël avec l'enfant.

Dispositif

Demande d'autorisation à former appel rejetée et ordonnance de retour confirmée. Le retour préalable de l'enfant rendait sans objet tout recours.

Motifs

Questions liées au retour de l'enfant

Doctrine du recours sans objet La cour observa que le défaut de dépôt en garantie de la mère avait eu pour conséquence d'interrompre le sursis à l'exécution après 10 jours. Par conséquent le père avait pu à bon droit emmener l'enfant à l'étranger. La Cour estima que l'élément clef pour décider si l'appel pouvait être entendu consistait à savoir si le père avait volontairement violé une décision judiciaire en quittant la Floride, ce qui n'était pas le cas. Bien qu'aucune des parties n'invoquait le fait que le recours était sans objet, la Cour estima qu'il l'était car il n'y avait plus de litige à résoudre et aucune des exceptions à cette doctrine n'était applicable. La Cour affirma que la mère pouvait user de recours en Israël désormais; toute décision qu'elle rendrait ne pourrait que consister en un simple conseil.

Commentaire INCADAT

Exécution de l'ordonnance de retour

Lorsqu'un parent ravisseur ne remet pas volontairement un enfant dont le retour a été judiciairement ordonné, l'exécution implique des mesures coercitives. L'introduction de telles mesures peut donner lieu à des difficultés juridiques et pratiques pour le demandeur. En effet, même lorsque le retour a finalement lieu, des retards considérables peuvent être intervenus avant que les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle ne statuent sur l'avenir de l'enfant. Dans certains cas exceptionnels les retards sont tels qu'il n'est plus approprié qu'un retour soit ordonné.


Travail de la Conférence de La Haye

Les Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement de la Convention de La Haye ont concentré des efforts considérables sur la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour.

Dans les conclusions de la Quatrième Commission spéciale de mars 2001, il fut noté :

« Méthodes et rapidité d'exécution des procédures

3.9       Les retards dans l'exécution des décisions de retour, ou l'inexécution de celles-ci, dans certains [É]tats contractants soulèvent de sérieuses inquiétudes. La Commission spéciale invite les [É]tats contractants à exécuter les décisions de retour sans délai et effectivement.

3.10       Lorsqu'ils rendent une décision de retour, les tribunaux devraient avoir les moyens d'inclure dans leur décision des dispositions garantissant que la décision aboutisse à un retour effectif et immédiat de l'enfant.

3.11       Les Autorités centrales ou autres autorités compétentes devraient fournir des efforts pour assurer le suivi des décisions de retour et pour déterminer dans chaque cas si l'exécution a eu lieu ou non, ou si elle a été retardée. »

Voir < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations ».

Afin de préparer la Cinquième Commission spéciale en novembre 2006, le Bureau permanent a élaboré un rapport sur « L'exécution des décisions fondées sur la Convention de La Haye de 1980 - Vers des principes de bonne pratique », Doc. prél. No 7 d'octobre 2006.

(Disponible sur le site de la Conférence à l'adresse suivante : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Documents préliminaires »).

Cette Commission spéciale souligna l'importance des principes de bonne pratique développés dans le rapport qui serviront à l'élaboration d'un futur Guide de bonnes pratiques sur les questions liées à l'exécution, voir : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations » et enfin « Commission Spéciale d'Octobre-Novembre 2006 »


Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)

Ces dernières années, la CourEDH a accordé une attention particulière à la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour fondées sur la Convention de La Haye. À plusieurs reprises elle estima que des États membres avaient failli à leur obligation positive de  prendre toutes les mesures auxquelles on pouvait raisonnablement s'attendre en vue de l'exécution, les condamnant sur le fondement de l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH) sur le respect de la vie familiale. Voir :

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, 25 January 2000 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 336] ;

Sylvester v. Austria, 24 April 2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 502] ;

H.N. v. Poland, 13 September 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 811] ;                       

Karadžic v. Croatia, 15 December 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 819] ;

P.P. v. Poland, Application no. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 941].

La Cour tient compte de l'ensemble des circonstances de l'affaire et des mesures prises par les autorités nationales.  Un retard de 8 mois entre l'ordonnance de retour et son exécution a pu être considéré comme ne violant pas le droit du parent demandeur au respect de sa vie familiale dans :

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, Application n°54429/00, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 859].

La Cour a par ailleurs rejeté les requêtes de parents qui avaient soutenu que les mesures d'exécution prises, y compris les mesures coercitives, violaient le droit au respect de leur vie familiale :

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, Application n°4783/03, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 860] ;

A.B. v. Poland, Application No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 943] ;

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, Application No 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 942] ;

L'obligation positive de prendre des mesures face à l'exécution d'une décision concernant le droit de garde d'un enfant a également été reconnue dans une affaire ne relevant pas de la Convention de La Haye :

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 898].

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1015].


Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme

La Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme a décidé que l'exécution immédiate d'une ordonnance de retour qui avait fait l'objet d'un recours ne violait pas les articles 8, 17, 19 ni 25 de la Convention américaine relative aux Droits de l'Homme (Pacte de San José), voir :

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 772].


Jurisprudence en matière d'exécution

Dans les exemples suivants l'exécution de l'ordonnance de retour s'est heurtée à des difficultés, voir :

Belgique
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 750] ;

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 915] ;

Suisse
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d’appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433] ;

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 423] ;

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 786] ;

5P.115/2006 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 840] ;

L'exécution peut également être rendue impossible en raison de la réaction des enfants en cause. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 420]

Lorsqu'un enfant a été caché pendant plusieurs années à l'issue d'une ordonnance de retour, il peut ne plus être dans son intérêt d'être l'objet d'une ordonnance de retour. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 112] ;

Espagne
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 899].