CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/USf 971

Court

Country

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Name

United States Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Lipez (Circuit Judge), Selya (Senior Circuit Judge), Siler (Senior Circuit Judge of the Sixth Circuit, sitting by designation)

States involved

Requesting State

GERMANY

Requested State

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Decision

Date

7 March 2008

Status

Final

Grounds

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12 | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Undertakings | Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2) | Human Rights - Art. 20

Order

Appeal dismissed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1)(b) 13(2) 20

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(1)(b) 13(2) 20

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Walsh v. Walsh, 221 F.3d 204, 222 (1st Cir. 2000) Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 1400 (6th Cir. 1993); Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1, 25-26 (1st Cir. 2002); Whallon v. Lynn, 230 F.3d 450, 455 (1st Cir. 2000).

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse
Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection
Separate Representation
Exercise of Discretion
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

Implementation & Application Issues

Measures to Facilitate the Return of Children
Undertakings

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

Compatibility of the Convention with National Constitutions
Compatibility of the Hague Convention with National Constitutions

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to two children born in Germany to a German father and an American mother. The family lived together in Germany until the parents separated in 2005. Thereafter the parents agreed to share time with their sons. In early 2006 the parents' relationship deteriorated when the mother discovered graphic photos of the boys which had been taken by the father. The mother then petitioned for sole custody.

A court ruled that the parents exercise joint parental custody. The father then made an identical application. A social worker who assessed the family recommended that the father's application be denied. She also recorded her concern about the acrimony between the parents. The mother then applied to have the father's access terminated and to relocate to the US.

Without ruling on either matter, the court seised conducted an investigation into the photographs. The appointed psychologist held that the father's interactions with the boys were positive and loving and that the photos had not negatively affected them. It warned that the parental dispute was the cause of harm. In November 2006 an order was made with regard to the father's access and the mother was forbidden from taking the boys to the US.

However, the mother removed the boys in January 2007. The father petitioned for their return under the Hague Convention. This application was upheld by the District Court for the District of Rhode Island, Kufner v. Kufner, 480 F. Supp. 2d 491 (D.R.I. 2007). The mother appealed.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and return ordered; the removal was wrongful and none of the exceptions had been established to the standard required under the Convention.

Grounds

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12

The mother argued that the removal was not wrongful as she had brought the younger son to the US for medical treatment. The Court held that this was irrelevant for purposes of the wrongful removal determination because the analysis turned on whether the removal was consistent with the rights of custody established in the country of habitual residence. The mother should have litigated such issues in Germany. In any even the facts did not supports the mother’s argument.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The District Court had appointed an independent expert in paediatrics, child abuse, child sexual abuse and child pornography, to assess whether the photographs of the sons constituted child pornography and whether the behaviour problems suffered by the children were indications of sexual abuse. The expert reported that there was no evidence to suggest that the father was a paedophile, that he was sexually aroused by children, or that the pictures were pornographic. She approved of the German investigations and stated that they were accurate assessments and that their conclusions were consistent with their reported observations. She determined that the symptoms that the boys displayed were consistent with the stress in their lives caused by the acrimonious custody dispute. She recommended that the boys not undergo further sexual abuse evaluation because it would increase their already-dangerous stress levels. Finally, she noted that they may have been psychologically abused by both parents because the parents' acrimonious relationship played out in front of them. These findings were not challenged on appeal.

Undertakings

The father had given undertakings to the District Court, notably to secure dismissal of German criminal charges against the mother that had arisen out of the dispute. The mother submitted however that these were insufficient to protect her and the boys upon their return. This was rejected by the 1st Circuit which noted that it had only previously reversed a District Court's imposition of undertakings as insufficient to protect when a grave risk of harm had been established: Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir.2002), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 459].

Objections of the Child to a Return - Art. 13(2)

Pursuant to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 17(c) and with the consent of the parties, the district court appointed a guardian ad litem and attorney for the brothers. The Court of Appeals ruled that the District Court had properly given little weight to the wishes of the brothers because of their young ages, lack of maturity, and susceptibility to parental influence. The District Court had not abused its discretion when it concluded that it would be harmful and pointless to allow the older child to testify. In this the Court of Appeals accepted the evidence of a child psychiatrist that the further questioning of the older child would cause him harm.

Human Rights - Art. 20

The mother argued that the Hague Convention violated the equal protection component of the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment. In this she claimed that the grave risk of harm standard was unconstitutional because she was entitled to the less-demanding best interests of the child standard. The Court did not admit the argument for it had not been raised at first instance, but it noted nevertheless that it was without merit for the best interests of the child standard applied in custody matters which was not the issue in a Hague Convention case.

INCADAT comment

Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse

Courts have responded in different ways when faced with allegations that the left-behind parent has acted inappropriately or sexually abused the wrongfully removed or retained children. In the most straightforward cases the accusations may simply be dismissed as unfounded. Where this is not possible courts have been divided as to whether a detailed investigation should be undertaken in the State of refuge, or, whether the relevant assessment should be conducted in the State of habitual residence, with interim measures being taken to attempt to protect the child on his return.

- Accusations Dismissed:

Belgium

Civ. Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/BE 706]

The father claimed that the mother sought the return of the child to have her declared mentally incapable and to sell her organs. The Court held, however, that even if the father's accusations were firmly held, they were not backed up by any evidence.
 
Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 666]
 
The Court held that if the mother had serious concerns with regard to her son, then she would not have left him in the care of the father on holiday after what she claimed there had been a serious incident.
 
J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, No 500-04-046027-075 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 968]

The mother claimed that a grave risk arose because the father was a sexual predator.
The Court noted that such allegations had been rejected in foreign proceedings. It equally drew attention to the fact that Convention proceedings concerned the return of the child and not the issue of custody. The fears of the mother and of the maternal grandparents were deemed to be largely irrational. There was also no proof that the judicial authorities in the State of habitual residence were corrupt. The Court instead expressed concerns about the actions of members of the maternal family (who had abducted the child notwithstanding the existence of three court orders to the contrary) as well as the mental state of the mother, who had kept the child in a state of fear of the father.

France
CA Amiens, 4 mars 1998, No de RG 5704759 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 704]

The Court rejected the allegation of physical violence against the father; if there had been violence, it was not of the level required to activate Article 13(1)(b).

New Zealand
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 303]

The Court rejected arguments by the mother that the father's alleged sexual practices would place the child at a grave risk of harm. The Court held that there was no evidence a return would expose the child to the level of harm contemplated under Article 13(1)(b).

Switzerland
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Appellate Court of the Canton Zurich), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 426]

The mother argued that the father was a danger to the children because, inter alia, he had sexually abused the daughter. In rejecting this accusation, the Court noted that the mother had previously been willing to leave the children in the father's sole care whilst she went abroad.

- Return ordered with investigation to be carried out in the State of habitual residence:

United Kingdom - England and Wales

N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 19]

The possible risk to the daughter needed to be investigated in the pending custody proceedings in Australia. In the interim, the child needed protection. However, this protection did not require the refusal of the application for her return. Such risk of physical harm as might exist was created by unsupervised contact to the father, not by return to Australia.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 361]

It was argued that the allegations of sexual abuse by the mother's cohabitee were of such a nature as to activate the Article 13(1)(b) exception. This was rejected by the Court. In doing this the Court noted that the Swedish authorities were aware of the case and had taken steps to ensure that the child would be protected upon her return: she would be placed in an analysis home with her mother. If the mother did not agree to this, the child would be placed in care. The Court also noted that the mother had now separated from her cohabitee.

Finland
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 360]

When considering whether the allegations of the father's sexual abuse of his daughter constituted a barrier to returning the children, the Court noted that one of the objectives of the Hague Child Abduction Convention was that the forum for the determination of custody issues was not to be changed at will and that the credibility of allegations as to the personal characteristics of the petitioner were most properly investigated in the spouses' common State of habitual residence. In addition, the Court noted that a grave risk of harm did not arise if the mother were to return with the children and saw to it that their living conditions were arranged in their best interests. Accordingly, the Court found that there was no barrier to the return of the children.

Ireland
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IE 389]

The Irish Supreme Court accepted that there was prima facie evidence of sexual abuse by the father and that the children should not be returned into his care. However, it found that the trial judge had erred in concluding that this amounted to a grave risk of harm in returning the children to England per se. In the light of the undertakings given by the father, there would be no grave risk in returning the children to live in the former matrimonial home in the sole care of their mother.

- Investigation to be undertaken in the State of refuge:

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/HK 595]

The Court of Appeal criticised the fact that the return order had been made conditional on the acts of a third party (the Swiss Central Authority) over whom China's (Hong Kong SAR) Court had neither jurisdiction nor control. The Court ruled that unless and until the allegations could be discounted altogether or after investigation could be found to have no substance, it was almost inconceivable that the trial court's discretion could reasonably and responsibly be exercised to return the child to the environment in which the alleged abuse took place.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. 2002) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 459]

The Court of Appeals for the First Circuit ruled that great care had to be exercised before returning a child where there existed credible evidence of the child having suffered sexual abuse. It further stated that a court should be particularly wary about using potentially unenforceable undertakings to try to protect a child in such situations.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 971]

The District Court had appointed an independent expert in paediatrics, child abuse, child sexual abuse and child pornography, to assess whether the photographs of the sons constituted child pornography and whether the behaviour problems suffered by the children were indications of sexual abuse. The expert reported that there was no evidence to suggest that the father was a paedophile, that he was sexually aroused by children, or that the pictures were pornographic. The expert approved of the German investigations and stated that they were accurate assessments and that their conclusions were consistent with their reported observations. The expert determined that the symptoms that the boys displayed were consistent with the stress in their lives caused by the acrimonious custody dispute and recommended that the boys not undergo further sexual abuse evaluation because it would increase their already-dangerous stress levels.

- Return Refused:

United Kingdom - Scotland

Q., Petitioner [2001] SLT 243 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 341]

The Court held that there was a possibility that the allegations of abuse were true. It was also possible that the child, if returned, could be allowed into the unsupervised company of the alleged abuser. The Court equally noted that a court in another Hague Convention country would be able to provide adequate protection. Consequently it was possible for a child to be returned where an allegation of sexual abuse had been made. However, on the facts, the Court ruled that in light of what had happened in France during the course of the various legal proceedings, the courts there might not be able or willing to provide adequate protection for the children. Consequently, the risk amounted to a grave risk that the return of the girl would expose her to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place her in an intolerable situation.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 597]

Having found that sexual abuse had occurred, the Court of Appeals ruled that this rendered immaterial the father's arguments that the courts of Sweden could take ameliorative actions to prevent further harm once the children had been returned. The Court of Appeals held that in such circumstances, Article 13(1)(b) did not require separate consideration either of undertakings or of the steps which might be taken by the courts of the country of habitual residence.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Separate Representation

There is a lack of uniformity in English speaking jurisdictions with regard to separate representation for children.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
An early appellate judgment established that in keeping with the summary nature of Convention proceedings, separate representation should only be allowed in exceptional circumstances.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 56].

Reaffirmed by:

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881];

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905].

The exceptional circumstances standard has been established in several cases, see:

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 57];

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 180];

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 168];

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 579];

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 829];

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 964].

In Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881] it was suggested by Thorpe L.J. that the bar had been raised by the Brussels II a Regulation insofar as applications for party status were concerned.

This suggestion was rejected by Baroness Hale in:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880]. Without departing from the exceptional circumstances test, she signalled the need, in the light of the new Community child abduction regime, for a re-appraisal of the way in which the views of abducted children were to be ascertained. In particular she argued for views to be sought at the outset of proceedings to avoid delays.

In Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905] Thorpe L.J. acknowledged that the bar had not been raised in applications for party status.  He rejected the suggestion that the bar had been lowered by the House of Lords in Re D.

However, in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937] Baroness Hale again intervened in the debate and affirmed that a directions judge should evaluate whether separate representation would add enough to the Court's understanding of the issues to justify the resultant intrusion, delay and expense which would follow.  This would suggest a more flexible test, however, she also added that children should not be given an exaggerated impression of the relevance and importance of their views and in the general run of cases party status would not be accorded.

Australia
Australia's supreme jurisdiction sought to break from an exceptional circumstances test in De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

However, the test was reinstated by the legislator in the Family Law Amendment Act 2000, see: Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

See:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
Children heard under Art 13(2) can be assisted by a lawyer (art 338-5 NCPC and art 388-1 Code Civil - the latter article specifies however that children so assisted are not conferred the status of a party to the proceedings), see:

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 853].

In Scotland & New Zealand there has been a much greater willingness to allow children separate representation, see for example:

United Kingdom - Scotland
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962];

M. Petitioner 2005 SLT 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 508];

New Zealand
K.S v.L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 532].

Exercise of Discretion

Where it is established that a child objects to a return and he is of sufficient age and maturity at which it is appropriate to take his views into account, then the Court seised of the case will have a discretion whether or not to make a return order.

Different approaches have been espoused as to the manner in which this discretion should be exercised and the relevant factors that should be taken into consideration.

Australia 
Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 904]

The appellate court found that the trial judge had erred in ruling that there had to be 'clear and compelling' reasons to frustrate the objectives of the Convention. The Court recalled that there were permitted exceptions to a mandatory return and where established these exceptions gave rise to a discretion. The relevant factors in the exercise of that discretion would vary according to each case, but would include giving significant weight to the objectives of the Convention in appropriate cases.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The exercise of the discretion has caused difficulty for the Court of Appeal, in particular the factors to be considered and the weight to be accorded to them.

In the first key case: 

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 87]

The Court of Appeal held that a court's discretion to refuse the immediate return of a child must be exercised with regard to the overall approach of the Convention, i.e. a child's best interests are furthered by a prompt return, unless there are exceptional circumstances for ordering otherwise.

In Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 60] contrasting views were put forward by two members of the panel.

Balcombe L.J., who was content for there to be a relatively flexible approach to the gateway findings of age and objection, held that the weight to be given to objections would vary with the age of the child, but the policy of the Convention would always be a very weighty factor.

Millet L.J., who advocated a stricter interpretation of the gateway filters, held that if it was appropriate to consider the views of a child then those views should prevail unless there were countervailing factors, which would include the policy of the Convention.

The third member of the panel gave his support to the interpretation of Balcombe L.J.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. took up the interpretation of Millett L.J.

The reasoning of Re. T. was implicitly accepted by a differently constituted Court of Appeal in:

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 579].

However, it was rejected in Zaffino v. Zaffino (Abduction: Children's Views) [2005] EWCA Civ 1012; [2006] 1 FLR 410 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 813].

The correct approach to the exercise of judicial discretion in England is now clearly that advanced by Balcombe L.J.

In Zaffino v. Zaffino the Court also held that regard could be paid to welfare considerations in the exercise of the discretion.  In that case, welfare considerations militated in favour of a return.

In Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 829] the Court of Appeal considered how discretion should be exercised in a case governed by the Brussels II a Regulation.  It held that the aims and policy of the Regulation had to be considered in addition to the policy of the Convention.

In Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901] the Court gave a general consideration to welfare considerations in deciding not to order the return of the 8 year old girl concerned.

The Court also appeared to accept an obiter comment raised in Vigreux v. Michel that there had to be an ‘exceptional' dimension to a case before a Court might consider exercising its discretion against a return order.

Exceptionality was raised in Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 964].  There a return order was made notwithstanding the strong objections of an independent 12 year old.  Particular emphasis was placed on the fact that the girl had come for a 2 week vacation.

In Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937] the House of Lords affirmed that it was wrong to import any test of exceptionality into the exercise of discretion under the Hague Convention. The circumstances in which a return may be refused were themselves exceptions to the general rule. That in itself was sufficient exceptionality. It was neither necessary nor desirable to import an additional gloss into the Convention.

Baroness Hale continued that where a discretion arose from the terms of the Convention itself, the discretion was at large.  In Article 13(2) cases the court would have to consider the nature and strength of the child's objections, the extent to which they were authentically the child's own or the product of the influence of the abducting parent, the extent to which they coincided or were at odds with other considerations which were relevant to the child's welfare, as well as general Convention considerations. The older the child, the greater the weight that objections would likely carry.

New Zealand
The Balcombe / Millett interpretations gave rise to contrasting High Court judgments. The Court of Appeal however voiced its preference for the Balcombe ‘shades of grey' approach in:

White v. Northumberland [2006] NZFLR 1105 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 902].

United Kingdom - Scotland
P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 963]

When exercising his discretion to make a return order, the trial judge noted that a return order should not be refused unless there were sound reasons for not giving effect to the objects of the Convention.  This was upheld on appeal.  The Inner House of the Court of Session further held that the existence of the Article 13 exceptions did not negate or eliminate the general policy of the Convention that wrongfully removed children should be returned.

Singh v. Singh 1998 SC 68 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 197]

The Court held that the welfare of the child was a general factor which should be taken into account in the exercise of discretion. A court should not limit itself to a consideration of the child's objection and the reasons for it. Nevertheless, the court held that a rule could not be laid down as to whether a child's welfare should be considered broadly or in detail; this was a matter within the discretion of the court concerned.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House held that a balancing exercise had to be carried out, and one of the factors in favour of return was the spirit and purpose of the Convention to allow the court of habitual residence to resolve the custody dispute.

United States of America
De Silva v. Pitts, 481 F.3d 1279, (10th Cir. 2007), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 903].

In upholding the views of a 14 year old boy the Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit paid regard to his best interests but not to the policy of the Convention.

France
An appellate court limited the weight to be placed on the objections of the children on the basis that before being interviewed they had had no contact with the applicant parent and had spent a long period of time with the abducting parent. Moreover the allegations of the children had already been considered by the authorities in the children's State of habitual residence:

CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947].

Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Undertakings

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Compatibility of the Hague Convention with National Constitutions

The Convention has been found to be in accordance with national constitutions or charters of rights in other Contracting States, see:

Argentina
W. v. O., 14 June 1995, Argentine Supreme Court of Justice, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AR 362];  

Belgium
N° 03/3585/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 547];  

Canada - Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
Parsons v. Styger, (1989) 67 OR (2d) 1, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 16];

Y.D. v. J.B., [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que.C.A.), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA/369];

Czech Republic
III. ÚS 440/2000 DAOUD / DAOUD, 7 December 2000, Ústavní soud České republiky (Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic);[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CZ 468];

Germany
2 BvR 982/95 and 2 BvR 983/95, Bundesverfassungsgericht, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 310];

2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

Ireland
C.K. v. C.K. [1993] ILRM 534, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 288];

W. v. Ireland and the Attorney General and M.W. [1994] ILRM 126, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 289];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Bundesgericht (Tribunal fédéral), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427];

5A_479/2007 /frs, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953];

United States of America
Fabri v. Pritikin-Fabri, 221 F. Supp. 2d 859 (2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/US 484];

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/US 971];

Rodriguez v. Nat'l Ctr. for Missing & Exploited Children, 2005 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 5658 (D.D.C., Mar. 31, 2005) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/US 799].

However, several challenges have been upheld in Spain, see:

Re S., Auto de 21 abril de 1997, Audiencia Provincial Barcelona, Sección 1a, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 244];

Carrascosa v. McGuire, 520 F.3d 249 (3rd Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 970].

Faits

La demande concernait deux enfants nés en Allemagne de père allemand et de mère américaine. La famille vivait en Allemagne jusqu'à la séparation des parents en 2005. Les parents optèrent alors pour la garde partagée. Début 2006, la relation des parents se dégrada lorsque la mère découvrit des photos explicites des enfants que le père avait prises. La mère demanda alors la garde exclusive.

Le tribunal ordonna la garde conjointe. Le père demanda ensuite la garde exclusive mais un travailleur social recommenda après enquête que la demande du père fût rejetée. Ce travailleur social exprima aussi son inquiétude face à la tension existant entre les parents. La mère demanda à ce que le droit de visite du père lui soit retiré et à se voir autorisée à s'installer aux États-Unis avec les enfants.

Sans se prononcer sur ces demandes, la cour saisie ordonna une expertise sur les photos des enfants. Un psychologue conclut que les rapports entre le père et les enfants étaient positifs et affectueux et que les photos n'avaient pas affecté ce rapport. Il ajouta que le conflit parental pourrait bien être dommageable pour les enfants. En novembre 2006, une décision fut rendue quant à la question du droit de visite du père qui interdit à la mère d'emmener les enfants aux États-Unis.

Toutefois la mère enleva les enfants en janvier 2007. Le père demanda le retour des enfants. Il obtint satisfaction en première instance: District Court for the District of Rhode Island, Kufner v. Kufner, 480 F. Supp. 2d 491 (D.R.I. 2007). La mère forma appel de cette décision.

Dispositif

Recours rejeté et retour ordonné; le déplacement était illicite et aucune des exceptions conventionnelles n'étaient applicables.

Motifs

Déplacement et non-retour - art. 3 et 12

La mère alléguait que le déplacement n'était pas illicite dans la mesure où elle avait emmené son fils cadet aux Etats-Unis afin qu'il y reçoive un traitement médical. La Cour décida que ce motif était sans pertinence puisque seule la question de savoir si le déplacement méconnaissait un droit de garde en application du droit de la résidence habituelle se posait. La mère aurait dû faire mention de cet élément dans le cadre d'une procédure en Allemagne. En tout état de cause les faits ne correspondaient pas aux allégations de la mère.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

Le tribunal fédéral avait demandé à un expert de se prononcer sur la question de savoir si les photos des enfants constituaient des photos pornographiques et si les problèmes comportementaux des enfants traduisaient un abus sexuel. L'expert conclut qu'aucun élément ne permettait de conclure que le père était pédophile, qu'il était attiré sexuellement par des enfants ni que les photos étaient pornographiques. Elle approuva l'enquête allemande et constata que les conclusions allemandes étaient conformes aux observations effectuées. Elle ajouta que les symptômes développés par les enfants étaient causés par le stress que la séparation très difficile des parents leur causait. Elle ajouta encore que les enfants ne devraient pas être soumis à d'autres évaluations en vue d'établir un abus sexuel car cela ne ferait qu'ajouter à leur niveau de stress déjà dangereusement élevé. Elle conclut que les enfants avaient sans doute souffert d'abus phychologique de la part des deux parents qui les avaient rendus témoins de leur séparation difficile. Ces éléments ne furent pas contestés en cause d'appel.

Engagements

Le père s'était engagé devant le tribunal fédéral à faire en sorte que les charges pénales retenues contre la mère en Allemagne du fait de l'enlèvement des enfants fûssent abandonnées. La mère allégait néanmoins que ce n'était pas suffisant pour la protéger, elle et les enfants en cas de retour en Allemagne. Cet argument fut rejeté par la cour d'appel du premier ressort qui observa qu'elle n'avait remis en cause des engagements imposés par un tribunal fédéral que dans une affaire dans laquelle il avait été établi que ces engagements étaient insuffisants au regard d'un risque grave de danger qui avait été prouvé. Voy. : Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir.2002), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 459].

Opposition de l'enfant au retour - art. 13(2)

En application de l'article 17 c de la loi de procédure civile fédérale et avec le consentement des parties, le tribunal fédéral avait désigné un gardien ad litem pour les enfants, qui bénéficiaient d'une représentation séparée. La Cour d'apel décida que c'était à bon droit que le tribunal avait accordé une faible importance aux souhaits des enfants, vu leur jeune âge, leur manque de maturité et l'importance probable d'une influence parentale indue. Le tribunal avait fait bon usage de son pouvoir d'appréciaition en concluant qu'il serait inutile et dommageable d'autoriser l'aîné des enfants à témoigner. La Cour d'appel approuva en cela l'expertise d'un pedopsychiatre qui avait conclu que la poursuite de l'audition de cet enfant lui causerait préjudice.

Droits de l'homme - art. 20

Selon la mère, la Convention de La Haye violait le volet "égalité dans la protection" du principe de droit au procès équitable du cinquième amendement de la Constitution. Elle défendait l'idée que l'exigence de risque grave de danger était unconstitutionnelle dans la mesure où elle avait droit à bénéficier de l'application du principe moins exigent de l'intérêt supérieur des enfants. La Cour refusa de considérer cet argument qui n'avait pas été soulevé en première instance mais observa néanmoins que ce point était sans pertinence dans la mesure où le principe de l'intérêt supérieur était applicable en matière de garde, une question distincte de celle soulevée par les affaires relevant de la Convention de La Haye.

Commentaire INCADAT

Allégations de mauvais traitement et abus sexuel

Les tribunaux ont adopté des positions variables lorsqu'ils ont été confrontés à des allégations selon lesquelles le parent délaissé avait fait subir des mauvais traitements ou abus sexuels à l'enfant déplacé ou retenu illicitement. Dans les affaires les plus simples, les accusations ont pu être rejetées comme non fondées. Lorsqu'il n'était pas évident que l'allégation était manifestement non fondée, les tribunaux se sont montrés divisés quant à savoir si une enquête poussée devait être menée dans l'État de refuge ou bien dans l'État de la résidence habituelle, auquel cas des mesures de protection provisoires seraient prises en vue de protéger l'enfant en cas de retour.

- Accusations déclarées non fondées :

Belgique

Civ Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 706]

Le père prétendait que la mère ne voulait le retour de l'enfant que pour la faire déclarer folle et vendre ses organes. Toutefois, le juge releva que si les déclarations du père relevaient d'une profonde conviction, elles n'étaient pas étayées d'éléments de preuve.

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 666]

La Cour décida que si la mère avait eu des craintes sérieuses à propos de son fils, elle ne l'aurait pas laissé aux soins du père pendant les vacances, après ce qu'elle présentait comme un incident sérieux.

J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, N°500-04-046027-075 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 968]

La mère faisait valoir un risque grave au motif que le père était un prédateur sexuel. La Cour rappela que toutes les procédures étrangères avaient rejeté ces allégations, et indiqua qu'il fallait garder en mémoire que la question posée était celle du retour et non de la garde. Elle constata que les craintes de la mère et de ses parents étaient largement irraisonnées, et que la preuve de la corruption des autorités judiciaires de l'État de résidence habituelle n'était pas davantage rapportée. La Cour exprima au contraire une crainte face à la réaction de la famille de la mère (rappelant qu'ils avaient enlevé l'enfant en dépit de 3 interdictions judiciaires de ce faire), ainsi qu'une critique concernant les capacités mentales de la mère, qui avait maintenu l'enfant dans un climat de peur de son père.

France
CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° RG 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation de violence physique du père à l'égard de l'enfant. S'il pouvait y avoir eu des épisodes violents, ils n'étaient pas de nature à caractériser le risque nécessaire à l'application de l'article 13(1)(b).

Nouvelle Zélande
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 303]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation selon laquelle les habitudes sexuelles du père étaient de nature à causer un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant. Elle ajouta que la preuve n'avait pas été apportée que le retour exposerait l'enfant à un risque tel que l'article 13(1)(b) serait applicable.

Suisse
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Cour d'appel du canton de Zurich) (Suisse), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 426]

La mère prétendait que le père constituait un danger pour les enfants parce qu'il avait entre autres abusé sexuellement de l'enfant. Pour rejeter cet argument, la Cour fit observer que la mère avait jusqu'alors laissé l'enfant vivre seul avec son père pendant qu'elle voyageait à l'étranger.

Retour ordonné et enquête à mener dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 19]

Le risque encouru par l'enfant devait faire l'objet d'une enquête dans le cadre de la procédure de garde en cours en Australie.  Il convenait de protéger l'enfant jusqu'à la conclusion de cette enquête. Toutefois cette nécessité de protection ne devait pas mener au rejet de la demande de retour car le risque était lié non pas au retour en Australie mais à un droit de visite et d'hébergement non surveillé.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 361]

La Cour rejeta les allégations selon lesquelles l'enfant était victime d'abus sexuels de la part du concubin de la mère de nature à déclencher le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b). Pour rejeter l'application de l'article 13(1)(b), la Cour avait relevé que les autorités suédoises étaient conscientes de ce risque d'abus et avaient pris des mesures précises de nature à protéger l'enfant à son retour : elle serait placée dans un foyer d'analyse avec sa mère. Si la mère refusait, alors l'enfant serait ôtée à sa famille et placée dans un foyer. Elle fit également remarquer que la mère s'était séparée de son concubin.

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 360]

Lors de son analyse concernant la question de savoir si l'allégation selon laquelle le père aurait abusé sexuellement de sa fille constituait une barrière au retour de l'enfant, la Cour a fait observer, d'une part, qu'un des objectifs de la Convention de La Haye était d'empêcher que le for devant se prononcer sur le retour de l'enfant soit choisi arbitrairement. La Cour observa, d'autre part, que la crédibilité des allégations devrait être analysée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle des époux car il s'agissait de l'État le mieux placé, et qu'aucun risque grave de danger n'existait si la mère accompagnait les enfants et organisait des conditions de vie dans leur meilleur intérêt. Dans ces conditions le retour pouvait être ordonné.

Irlande
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 389]

La Cour suprême irlandaise a noté qu'à première vue la preuve avait été apportée que les enfants avaient été victimes d'abus sexuels de la part du père et ne devaient pas être placés sous sa garde. Cependant, le tribunal avait estimé à tort que le retour des enfants en lui-même constituerait un risque grave. Au vu des engagements pris par le père, il n'y aurait pas de risque grave à renvoyer les enfants dans leur foyer familial sous la seule garde de la mère.

- Enquête à mener dans l'État de refuge :

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 595]

La Cour d'appel critiqua le fait que le retour était soumis à une condition sur laquelle les juridictions de la Chine (RAS Hong Kong) n'avaient aucun contrôle (ni aucune compétence). La condition posée étant l'action d'un tiers (l'Autorité centrale suisse). La Cour estima que jusqu'à ce que les allégations se révèlent dénuées de fondement, il n'était pas admissible que la cour, dans l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire, décide de renvoyer l'enfant dans le milieu dans lequel les abus s'étaient produits.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir.2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 459]

La Cour d'appel du premier ressort estima que le premier juge aurait dû faire preuve d'une grande prudence avant de renvoyer un enfant alors même qu'il y avait de sérieuses raisons de croire qu'il avait fait l'objet d'abus sexuels. La Cour d'appel ajouta que les juges devaient se montrer particulièrement prudents dans leur tentative de garantir la protection de l'enfant par la voie d'engagements dans des situations analogues.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 971]

Le Tribunal fédéral avait demandé à un pédiatre spécialisé dans les questions de maltraitance, d'abus sexuels sur enfants et de pédopornographie de se prononcer sur la question de savoir si les photos des enfants constituaient des photos pornographiques et si les troubles comportementaux des enfants traduisaient un abus sexuel. L'expert conclut qu'aucun élément ne permettait de déduire que le père était pédophile, qu'il était attiré sexuellement par des enfants ni que les photos étaient pornographiques. Elle approuva l'enquête allemande et constata que les conclusions allemandes étaient conformes aux observations effectuées. Elle ajouta que les symptômes développés par les enfants étaient causés par le stress que la séparation très difficile des parents leur causait. Elle ajouta encore que les enfants ne devaient pas être soumis à d'autres évaluations en vue d'établir un abus sexuel car cela ne ferait qu'ajouter à leur niveau de stress déjà dangereusement élevé.

- Retour refusé :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Q., Petitioner, [2001] SLT 243, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 341]

Le juge estima qu'il était possible que les allégations d'abus fussent exactes. De même, il n'était pas impossible qu'en cas de retour, l'enfant puisse être amené à avoir un contact non surveillé avec l'auteur potentiel de ces abus. Elle observa toutefois que les autorités d'autres États parties à la Convention de La Haye sont susceptibles de fournir une protection adéquate à l'enfant. En conséquence, le retour d'un enfant pouvait être ordonné même en cas d'allégations d'abus sexuels. En l'espèce cependant, le juge estima qu'au regard des différentes procédures ouvertes en France, il semblait que les juridictions compétentes n'étaient pas en mesure de protéger l'enfant, ou pas disposées à le faire. Elle en a déduit que le retour de l'enfant l'exposerait à un risque grave de danger physique ou psychologique ou la placerait de toute autre manière dans une situation intolérable.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 597]

Ces conclusions rendaient inopérants les arguments du père selon lequel les autorités suédoises pourraient prendre des mesures pour limiter tout danger supplémentaire une fois les enfants rentrées dans ce pays. La Cour d'appel décida qu'en ces circonstances, l'application de l'article 13(1)(b) n'exigeait pas que la question des engagements du père soit posée, pas davantage que celle des mesures à prendre par les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle.

(Auteur : Peter McEleavy, Avril 2013)

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - article 13(2)

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - ARTICLE 13(2)

On constate une absence d'uniformité dans les États de langue anglaise quant à la question de la représentation autonome des enfants à la procédure. 

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans des décisions anciennes rendues par la Cour d'appel on considérait qu'étant donné le caractère sommaire de la procédure relative à la Convention, une représentation séparée des enfants en cause ne devait être admise que dans des cas exceptionnels.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 56] ;

Position reprise dans :

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881] ;

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905].

Le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles fut admis dans les affaires suivantes :

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 57] ;

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 180] ;

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 168] ;

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 579] ;

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 829] ;

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 964].

Dans Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881]; le juge Thorpe L.J. estima que les exigences avaient été rendues plus strictes par le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis, dans la mesure où elles concernaient les demandes relatives au statut des parties.

Cette position fut rejetée par le juge Hale :

Sans toutefois remettre en cause le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles, le juge Hale de la Chambre des Lords signala dans l'affaire Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] la nécessité de revoir la manière dont la position des enfants en cause est recherchée, à la lumière des exigences du nouveau régime communautaire de l'enlèvement d'enfants. En particulier elle souligna l'importance de rechercher si l'enfant s'oppose à son retour dès le début de la procédure afin d'éviter des retards.

Dans Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905] le juge Thorpe L.J. reconnut que le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis ne rendait pas plus strictes les exigences en matière de statut des parties ; il rejeta également l'idée que Re D. assouplissait ces exigences.

Toutefois, dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @937@] le juge Hale intervint de nouveau dans ce débat pour affirmer qu'un juge de la mise en état devait évaluer si une représentation autonome de l'enfant était de nature à permettre à la cour de gagner tant en compréhension que cela pourrait justifier l'intrusion, le retard et le coût qu'un tel statut entraînerait. Une telle approche semble suggérer un critère plus flexible, cependant elle ajouta également que les enfants ne doivent pas avoir une impression exagérée de l'importance et de la pertinence de leur opinion, précisant qu'en général, ceux-ci ne devraient pas intervenir en tant que parties. 

Australie
La cour suprême d'Australie a tenté de se départir du critère des circonstances exceptionnelles dans l'affaire De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93].

Toutefois, l'exigence de circonstances exceptionnelles fut rétablie par le législateur dans le cadre d'une réforme du droit de la famille en 2000. Voir : Family Law Amendment Act 2000, et Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

Voir:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
En France, les enfants entendus dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) peuvent être assistés d'un avocat (art 338-5 NCPC et art 388-1 Code Civil - cette dernière disposition précise cependant que l'audition assistée d'un avocat ne leur confère pas le statut de partie à la procédure). Voir :

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 853].

En Écosse et en Nouvelle-Zélande, on constate que les tribunaux admettent plus facilement qu'un enfant soit représenté séparément à la procédure. Voir par exemple :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @962@];

M Petitioner 2005 SLT 2, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 508];

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S v. L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 532].

Exercice d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire

Lorsqu'il est établi qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour et a un âge et une maturité suffisants pour qu'il soit approprié de tenir compte de son opinion, le tribunal saisi a un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour décider d'ordonner ou non le retour de l'enfant. 

Des approches différentes se sont fait jour quant à la manière dont ce pouvoir discrétionnaire peut être exercé et quant aux différents facteurs à considérer dans ce cadre. 

Australie        
Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 904]

La Cour d'appel estima que le juge du premier degré n'aurait pas dû considérer qu'il devait y avoir des arguments « clairs et convaincants » pour aller à l'encontre des objectifs de la Convention. La Cour rappela que la Convention prévoyait un nombre limité d'exceptions au retour et que si ces exceptions étaient applicables, la Cour disposait d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire. Il convenait pour cela de s'intéresser à l'ensemble des circonstances de la cause tout en accordant si nécessaire, un poids important aux objectifs de la Convention.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
L'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire a causé des difficultés à la Cour d'appel notamment en ce qui concerne les éléments à prendre en compte et le poids qu'il convenait de leur accorder. 

Dans la première décision phare, Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 87], la Cour d'appel estima que le pouvoir discrétionnaire de refuser le retour immédiat d'un enfant devait être exercé en tenant compte de l'approche globale de la Convention, c'est-à-dire de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant à être renvoyé, à moins que des circonstances exceptionnelles existent qui conduisent au refus.

Dans Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 60], des opinions différentes furent défendues par deux des juges d'appel :

Le juge Balcombe L.J., favorable à une approche relativement flexible quant aux éléments de l'âge et de l'opposition,  défendit l'idée que certes l'importance  à accorder à l'opposition de l'enfant devait varier en fonction de son âge mais qu'en tout état de cause, les objectifs de la Convention devaient être un facteur primordial. 

Le juge Millet L.J., qui soutenait une approche plus stricte des conditions d'application de l'exception - âge et opposition - se prononça en faveur de l'idée que l'opposition de l'enfant devait prévaloir à moins que des éléments contraires, y compris les objectifs de la Convention, doivent primer.

Le troisième juge se rangea à l'opinion du juge Balcombe L.J.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. suivit l'interprétation du juge Millett L.J.

Le raisonnement de Re. T fut ensuite implicitement suivi par un collège de juges autrement composé de la Cour d'appel :

Re J. (Children) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 579]

Il fut toutefois rejeté dans l'affaire Zaffino v. Zaffino (Abduction: Children's Views) [2005] EWCA Civ 1012; [2006] 1 FLR 410 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 813].

La jurisprudence anglaise suit désormais l'approche du juge Balcombe L.J.

Dans Zaffino v. Zaffino, la cour estima qu'il convenait également de tirer les conséquences du principe de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant.  Cet intérêt militait en l'espèce en faveur du retour. 

Dans Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 829] la Cour d'appel considéra comment ce pouvoir discrétionnaire devait s'appliquer dans les affaires régies par le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis. Elle estima que les buts et objectifs du Règlement devaient être pris en compte en plus des objectifs de la Convention. 

Dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901] la Cour suivit l'intérêt de l'enfant et refusa d'ordonner le retour de la fillette de 8 ans qui était en cause. La Cour sembla suivre le commentaire obiter exprimé dans Vigreux selon lequel la décision de ne pas ordonner le retour d'un enfant devait être liée à une dimension « exceptionnelle » du cas.

La dimension exceptionnelle fut discutée dans l'affaire Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 964]. Une ordonnance de retour fut prononcée nonobstant l'opposition forte d'une enfant indépendante de 12 ans. En l'espèce le fait que le problème était apparu à l'occasion de vacances de 2 semaines fut un facteur déterminant.

Dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937] la Chambre des Lords affirma qu'il convenait de ne pas importer la notion de caractère exceptionnel dans le cadre de l'exercice d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire ouvert par la Convention. Les circonstances dans lesquelles le retour peut être refusé sont elles-mêmes des exceptions au principe général, ce qui en soi est une dimension exceptionnelle suffisante. Il n'était ni nécessaire ni désirable d'exiger une dimension exceptionnelle supplémentaire.

Le juge Hale ajouta que lorsque la Convention ouvre la porte à un exercice discrétionnaire, ce pouvoir discrétionnaire était illimité. Dans les affaires relevant de l'article 13(2), il appartenait aux juges de considérer la nature et la force de l'opposition de l'enfant, dans quelle mesure cette opposition émane de l'enfant lui-même ou est influencée par le parent ravisseur, et enfin, dans quelle mesure cette opposition est dans le prolongement de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant et des objectifs généraux de la Convention. Plus l'enfant était âgé, plus son opposition devait en principe compter.

Nouvelle-Zélande
Les interprétations de Balcombe / Millett donnèrent lieu à des jugements contrastés de la High Court. Toutefois, la Cour d'appel s'exprima en faveur de l'approche de Balcombe dans :

White v. Northumberland [2006] NZFLR 1105 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 902].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 963

Dans le cadre de l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire d'ordonner le retour, le juge de première instance avait observé que le retour devait être ordonné à moins que de bonnes raisons justifient qu'il soit fait exception à la Convention. Cette position fut approuvée par la cour d'appel, qui estima que l'existence des exceptions ne niait pas le principe général selon lequel les enfants victimes de déplacements illicites devaient être renvoyés.

Singh v. Singh 1998 SC 68 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 197]

La Cour estima que le bien-être de l'enfant était un élément à prendre en compte dans le cadre de  l'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire. Le juge ne devait pas se limiter à une simple considération de l'opposition de l'enfant et de ses raisons. Toutefois la Cour décida qu'aucune règle ne pouvait s'appliquer quant à la question de savoir si l'intérêt de l'enfant devait s'entendre de manière large ou faire l'objet d'une analyse détaillée ; cette question relevait du pouvoir discrétionnaire de la cour. 

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805], l'instance d'appel estima qu'il convenait de mettre en balance tous les éléments, l'un des éléments en faveur du retour étant l'esprit et l'objectif de la Convention de faire en sorte que la question de la garde soit tranchée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant. 

États-Unis d'Amérique
De Silva v. Pitts, 481 F.3d 1279, (10th Cir. 2007), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 903

La Cour d'appel tint compte de l'opposition d'un enfant de 14 ans, tirant les conséquences de son intérêt supérieur mais non de l'objectif de la Convention.

France
Une juridiction d'appel modéra la force probante de l'opposition au motif que les enfants avaient vécu longuement avec le parent et sans contact avec le parent victime avant d'être entendus, observant également que les faits dénoncés par les enfants avaient par ailleurs été pris en compte par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle:

CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947].

Sauvegarde des droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Engagements

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Compatibilité de la Convention de La Haye avec les constitutions nationales

La Convention a été déclarée conforme aux constitutions internes ou chartes des droits fondamentaux de nombreux États contractants :

Argentine
W. v. O., 14 June 1995, Argentine Supreme Court of Justice, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AR 362] ;  

Belgique
N° 03/3585/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 547] ;  

Canada - Charte canadienne des droits et libertés
Parsons v. Styger, (1989) 67 OR (2d) 1, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 16];

Y.D. v. J.B., [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA/369] ;

République Tchèque
III. ÚS 440/2000 DAOUD / DAOUD, 7 December 2000, Ústavní soud České republiky (Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CZ 468] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 982/95 and 2 BvR 983/95, Bundesverfassungsgericht, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 310] ;

2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

Irlande
C.K. v. C.K. [1993] ILRM 534, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 288] ;

W. v. Ireland and the Attorney General and M.W. [1994] ILRM 126, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 289] ;

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309] ;

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Bundesgericht (Tribunal fédéral), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/CH 427] ;

5A_479/2007 /frs, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Fabri v. Pritikin-Fabri, 221 F. Supp. 2d 859 (2001); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 484] ;

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 971] ;

Rodriguez v. Nat'l Ctr. for Missing & Exploited Children, 2005 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 5658 (D.D.C., Mar. 31, 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 799].

Toutefois plusieurs décisions espagnoles ont adopté une position différente, voir :

Re S., Auto de 21 abril de 1997, Audiencia Provincial Barcelona, Sección 1a, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 244];

Carrascosa v. McGuire, 520 F.3d 249 (3rd Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 970].