CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Duran v. Beaumont, 534 F.3d 142, (2nd Cir. 2008);

INCADAT reference

HC/E/USf 976

Court

Country

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Name

United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Winter & Wesley (Circuit Judges), Cogan (District Judge)

States involved

Requesting State

CHILE

Requested State

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Decision

Date

18 July 2008

Status

Final

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3 | Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Rights of Access - Art. 21

Order

Appeal dismissed, application dismissed

HC article(s) Considered

3

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133, (2d Cir. 2000) Blondin v. Dubois, 238 F.3d 153, (2d Cir. 2001) Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124, (2d Cir. 2005) Karaha Bodas Co., L.L.C. v. PerusahaanPertambangan Minyak Dan Gas Bumi Negara, 313 F.3d 70, (2d Cir. 2002); Norden-Powers v. Beveridge, 125 F.Supp.2d 634 (E.D.N.Y. 2000); Navani v. Shahani, 496 F.3d 1121, (10th Cir. 2007).

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Habitual Residence
Habitual Residence

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Access / Contact

Protection of Rights of Access
Protection of Rights of Access

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to a child born in April 2001 in Chile to Chilean parents. The child lived with her parents until their separation in 2004. Thereafter she lived with the mother and had contact with her father.

Under the Chilean Civil Code when parents in such circumstances lived separately responsibility for the personal care of the child rests with the mother, but the father retains the right to determine whether the child should be able to leave the country and the right to maintain a direct and regular relationship with the child.

In 2005 the mother sought to take the child to the US. The father withheld his consent, leading to the mother issuing legal proceedings. The Eight Minor's Court of Santiago subsequently authorized the mother to take the child to the US for a period of 3 months. This period expired on 3 November 2005. Mother and child did not return.

On 25 July 2006 the father filed a return petition with the US District Court for the Southern District of New York. This petition was denied on the basis that he did not possess rights of custody. The father appealed.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and petition dismissed; the retention of the child was not wrongful as it did not breach any actually exercised rights of custody.

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3

The child was held to be habitually resident in Chile at the time of the retention for there was no joint settled intention to abandon Chile as the place of habitual residence.

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

In a majority verdict the 2nd Circuit dismissed the appeal. The majority recalled the reasoning the 2nd Circuit had previously employed in the case of Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133, (2d Cir. 2000) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313]: “custody of a child entails the primary duty and ability to choose and give sustenance, shelter, clothing, moral and spiritual guidance, medical attention, education, etc., or the (revocable) selection of other people or institutions to give these things.” Under the Hague Convention “references a bundle of rights … and is in some tension with the idea … that one can have custody by holding a single power such as the veto conferred by a ne exeat clause.” Whilst a ne exeat right, such as that held by the father, limits a custodial parent’s power to expatriate a child, it does not amount to a power to determine where the child will live. The Hague Convention “does not contemplate return of a child to a parent whose sole right-to 5 visit or veto-imposes no duty to give care”. The majority further held that the District Court had not been bound to follow an affidavit from the Chilean Central Authority which provided that the father held custodial rights under Chilean law. Wesley CJ dissented noted that whilst Croll undoubtedly held that a ne exeat clause could not convert rights of access into rights of custody where there had been an explicit judicial determination of the respective rights of the parents. This did not rule out the possibility that a statutorily enshrined ne exeat clause might be evidence of a legal regime’s recognition of shared “rights of custody” in the absence of any judicial determination. He further held that there was no evidence that the District Court had given any deference to the interpretation of Chilean law provided by the Central Authority. Recommending that the case be remitted to the District Court, Wesley CJ also drew attention to the issue of comity noting that if a US child had been taken to Chile and had not been returned as promised the US authorities would expect adherence to the provisions of its laws and careful attention to be given to the rights given to parents.

Rights of Access - Art. 21

The Court held that whilst remedies existed where a child was removed in breach of access rights the remedy for such an action did not include a return to the child’s place of habitual residence. In such circumstances District Courts might fashion a remedy ordering the custodial parent who has removed the child to allow and financially provide for periodic visits by the non-custodial parent.

INCADAT comment

Habitual Residence

The interpretation of the central concept of habitual residence (Preamble, Art. 3, Art. 4) has proved increasingly problematic in recent years with divergent interpretations emerging in different jurisdictions. There is a lack of uniformity as to whether in determining habitual residence the emphasis should be exclusively on the child, with regard paid to the intentions of the child's care givers, or primarily on the intentions of the care givers. At least partly as a result, habitual residence may appear a very flexible connecting factor in some Contracting States yet much more rigid and reflective of long term residence in others.

Any assessment of the interpretation of habitual residence is further complicated by the fact that cases focusing on the concept may concern very different factual situations. For example habitual residence may arise for consideration following a permanent relocation, or a more tentative move, albeit one which is open-ended or potentially open-ended, or indeed the move may be for a clearly defined period of time.

General Trends:

United States Federal Appellate case law may be taken as an example of the full range of interpretations which exist with regard to habitual residence.

Child Centred Focus

The United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit has advocated strongly for a child centred approach in the determination of habitual residence:

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 935].

See also:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 221].

Combined Child's Connection / Parental Intention Focus

The United States Courts of Appeals for the 3rd and 8th Circuits, have espoused a child centred approach but with reference equally paid to the parents' present shared intentions.

The key judgment is that of Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 83].

See also:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 879].

In the latter case a distinction was drawn between the situation of very young children, where particular weight was placed on parental intention(see for example: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 808]) and that of older children where the impact of parental intention was more limited.

Parental Intention Focus

The judgment of the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 301] has been highly influential in providing that there should ordinarily be a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence before a child can acquire a new one.

This interpretation has been endorsed and built upon in other Federal appellate decisions so that where there was not a shared intention on the part of the parents as to the purpose of the move this led to an existing habitual residence being retained, even though the child had been away from that jurisdiction for an extended period of time. See for example:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 777]: United States habitual residence retained after 8 months of an intended 4 year stay in Germany;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 780]: United States habitual residence retained during 32 month stay in Mexico;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 482]: United States habitual residence retained during 27 month stay in Greece.

The Mozes approach has also been approved of by the Federal Court of Appeals for the 2nd and 7th Circuits:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 878].

It should be noted that within the Mozes approach the 9th Circuit did acknowledge that given enough time and positive experience, a child's life could become so firmly embedded in the new country as to make it habitually resident there notwithstanding lingering parental intentions to the contrary.

Other Jurisdictions

There are variations of approach in other jurisdictions:

Austria
The Supreme Court of Austria has ruled that a period of residence of more than six months in a State will ordinarily be characterized as habitual residence, and even if it takes place against the will of the custodian of the child (since it concerns a factual determination of the centre of life).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
In the Province of Quebec, a child centred focus is adopted:

In Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 651], the Cour d'appel de Montréal held that the determination of the habitual residence of a child was a purely factual issue to be decided in the light of the circumstances of the case with regard to the reality of the child's life, rather than that of his parents. The actual period of residence must have endured for a continuous and not insignificant period of time; the child must have a real and active link to the place, but there is no minimum period of residence which is specified.

Germany
A child centred, factual approach is also evident in German case law:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 944].

This has led to the Federal Constitutional Court accepting that a habitual residence may be acquired notwithstanding the child having been wrongfully removed to the new State of residence:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 233].

The Constitutional Court upheld the finding of the Higher Regional Court that the children had acquired a habitual residence in France, notwithstanding the nature of their removal there. This was because habitual residence was a factual concept and during their nine months there, the children had become integrated into the local environment.

Israel
Alternative approaches have been adopted when determining the habitual residence of children. On occasion, strong emphasis has been placed on parental intentions. See:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 939].

However, reference has been made to a more child centred approach in other cases. See:

decision of the Supreme Court in C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 922].

New Zealand
In contrast to the Mozes approach the requirement of a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence was specifically rejected by a majority of the New Zealand Court of Appeal. See

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 816].

Switzerland
A child centred, factual approach is evident in Swiss case law:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841].

United Kingdom
The standard approach is to consider the settled intention of the child's carers in conjunction with the factual reality of the child's life.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 2]. For academic commentary on the different models of interpretation given to habitual residence. See:

R. Schuz, "Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice", Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13, No. 1, 2001, p. 1;

R. Schuz, "Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context", Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Protection of Rights of Access

Article 21 has been subjected to varying interpretations.  Contracting States favouring a literal interpretation have ruled that the provision does not establish a basis of jurisdiction for courts to intervene in access matters and is focussed on procedural assistance from the relevant Central Authority.  Other Contracting States have allowed proceedings to be brought on the basis of Article 21 to give effect to existing access rights or even to create new access rights.

A literal interpretation of the provision has found favour in:

Austria
S. v. S., 25 May 1998, transcript (official translation), Regional civil court at Graz, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 245];

Germany
2 UF 286/97, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 488];

United States of America
Bromley v. Bromley, 30 F. Supp. 2d 857, 860-61 (E.D. Pa. 1998). [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 223];

Teijeiro Fernandez v. Yeager, 121 F. Supp. 2d 1118, 1125 (W.D. Mich. 2000);

Janzik v. Schand, 22 November 2000, United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 463];

Wiggill v. Janicki, 262 F. Supp. 2d 687, 689 (S.D.W. Va. 2003);

Yi Ly v. Heu, 296 F. Supp. 2d 1009, 1011 (D. Minn. 2003);

In re Application of Adams ex. rel. Naik v. Naik, 363 F. Supp. 2d 1025, 1030 (N.D. Ill. 2005);

Wiezel v. Wiezel-Tyrnauer, 388 F. Supp. 2d 206 (S.D.N.Y. 2005), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 828];

Cantor v. Cohen, 442 F.3d 196 (4th Cir. 2006), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 827]. 

In Cantor, the only US appellate decision on Article 21, there was a dissenting judgment which found that the US implementing act did provide a jurisdictional basis for federal courts to hear an application with regard to an existing access right.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re G. (A Minor) (Enforcement of Access Abroad) [1993] Fam 216 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 110].

More recently however the English Court of Appeal has suggested that it might be prepared to consider a more permissive interpretation:

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

Baroness Hale has recommended the elaboration of a procedure whereby the facilitation of rights of access in the United Kingdom under Article 21 could be contemplated at the same time as the return of the child under Article 12:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51[INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

Switzerland
Arrondissement judiciaire I Courterlary-Moutier-La Neuveville (Suisse) 11 October 1999, N° C 99 4313 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 454].                        

A more permissive interpretation of Article 21 has indeed been adopted elsewhere, see:

United Kingdom - Scotland
Donofrio v. Burrell, 2000 S.L.T. 1051 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 349].

Wider still is the interpretation adopted in New Zealand, see:

Gumbrell v. Jones [2001] NZFLR 593 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 446].

Australia
The position in Australia has evolved in the light of statutory reforms.

Initially a State Central Authority could only apply for an order that was ‘necessary or appropriate to organise or secure the effective exercise of rights of access to a child in Australia', see:

Director-General, Department of Families Youth & Community Care v. Reissner [1999] FamCA 1238, (1999) 25 Fam LR 330, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 278].

Subsequently it acquired the power to initiate proceedings to establish access rights:

State Central Authority & Peddar [2008] FamCA 519, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1107];

State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1106].

Faits

La demande concernait un enfant né au Chili en avril 2001 de parents chiliens. l'enfant avait vécu avec ses parents jusqu'à leur séparation en 2004. Ensuite elle vécut avec la mère, le père disposant d'un droit de visite.

Selon le Code civil chilien, c'était la mère qui avait la garde de l'enfant mais le père conservait le droit de décider si l'enfant pouvait quitter le pays ainsi que le droit de maintenir un contact direct et régulier avec l'enfant.

En 2005, la mère exprima le désir d'emmener l'enfant aux États-Unis. Le père refusa, ce qui conduisit la mère à introduire une action en justice. Un tribunal de Santiago autorisa la mère à séjourner aux États-Unis avec l'enfant pour une période de 3 mois, jusqu'au 3 novembre 2005. La mère et l'enfant ne rentrèrent pas au Chili à cette date.

Le 25 juillet 2006, le père forma une demande de retour. Le tribunal fédéral de New York sud rejeta sa demande au motif que le père ne disposait pas d'un droit de garde. La père forma appel de cette décision.

Dispositif

Recours rejeté et demande rejetée; le non-retour de l'enfant n'était pas illicite puisqu'il n'avait pas intervenu en violation d'un droit de garde effectivement exercé.

Motifs

Résidence habituelle - art. 3

L'enfant fut considéré comme ayant sa résidence habituelle au Chili au moment du non-retour car les parents n'avaient pas l'intention conjointe et ferme d'abandonner leur résidence habituelle au Chili.

Droit de garde - art. 3

Par une majorité de deux contre 1, la cour d'appel débouta le père de son recours, se fondant sur le raisonnement utilisé par la même cour dans l'affaire Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133, (2d Cir. 2000) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313]: “la garde d'un enfant comprend le droit et le devoir primaires de choisir et donner de la nourriture, un toit, des vêtements, un modèle spirituel ou moral, une éducation, un examen médical etc ou la sélection (révocable) des personnes physiques ou morales pouvant prodiguer ces éléments". La Convention de La Haye "renvoie à un ensemble de droits dont doit bénéficier le parent dans une certaine proportion pour pouvoir invoquer utilement la Convention" et ne correspond pas parfaitement avec l'idée qu'une personne pourrait disposer d'un droit de garde simplement parce qu'elle a un pouvoir unique tel qu'un pouvoir de veto en application d'une clause d'interdiction de sortie du territoire" . "Un droit de s'opposer à l'expatriation de l'enfant"... ne donne "aucun droit d'influencer les questions de garde, ni même de participer à la définition du lieu de résidence de l'enfant". La Convention de La Haye ne prévoit pas le retour d'un enfant à un parent qui n'a pas le droit de s'occuper quotidiennement de lui mais a un simple droit de visite et de veto. La majorité décoda que le tribunal n'était pas obligé d'accepter la preuve fournie par l'Autorité centrale chilienne que le père disposait en droit chilien d'un droit de garde sur l'enfant. La juge Wesley exprima une opinion dissidente. Il souligna que si la décision Croll posait indubitablement qu'un simple droit de veto ne pouvait transformer ce qui n'était du reste qu'un droit de visite (accordé par une décision judiciaire) en droit de garde, elle n'excluait pas la possibilité qu'un droit de veto légal puisse être le signe d'un régime primaire de garde conjointe. Il ajouta qu'aucun élément ne permettait de constater que le tribunal de première instance avait tenu compte de l'interprétation du droit chilien décrite par l'Autorité centrale. Il recommenda un renvoi de l'affaire devant le premier juge, soulignant l'importance de la courtoisie internationale: si un enfant américain avait été emmené au Chili et y avait été maintenu au delà de la date prévue pour son retour, les autorités américaines s'attendraient à ce que les dispositions de son droit soient respectées notamment en ce qui concerne les droits qu'elles accordent à des parents.

Droit de visite - art. 21

La Cour estima que des recours existaient en cas de déplacement d'un enfant en violation d'un droit de visite, mais que ces voies de recours ne pouvaient mener au renvoi de l'enfant vers l'Etat de sa résidence habituelle. Dans de telles circonstances, les tribunaux fédéraux pouvaient ordonner que le parent disposant de la garde et ayant emmené l'enfant permette et supporte financièrement des visites régulières du parent ne disposant pas de la garde.

Commentaire INCADAT

Résidence habituelle

L'interprétation de la notion centrale de résidence habituelle (préambule, art. 3 et 4) s'est révélée particulièrement problématique ces dernières années, des divergences apparaissant dans divers États contractants. Une approche uniforme fait défaut quant à la question de savoir ce qui doit être au cœur de l'analyse : l'enfant seul, l'enfant ainsi que l'intention des personnes disposant de sa garde, ou simplement l'intention de ces personnes. En conséquence notamment de cette différence d'approche, la notion de résidence peut apparaître comme un élément de rattachement très flexible dans certains États contractants ou un facteur de rattachement plus rigide et représentatif d'une résidence à long terme dans d'autres.

L'analyse du concept de résidence habituelle est par ailleurs compliquée par le fait que les décisions concernent des situations factuelles très diverses. La question de la résidence habituelle peut se poser à l'occasion d'un déménagement permanent à l'étranger, d'un déménagement consistant en un test d'une durée illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée ou simplement d'un séjour à l'étranger de durée déterminée.

Tendances générales:

La jurisprudence des cours d'appel fédérales américaines illustre la grande variété d'interprétations données au concept de résidence habituelle.
Approche centrée sur l'enfant

La cour d'appel fédérale des États-Unis d'Amérique du 6e ressort s'est prononcée fermement en faveur d'une approche centrée sur l'enfant seul :

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 935]

Voir aussi :

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 221].

Approche combinée des liens de l'enfant et de l'intention parentale

Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis d'Amérique des 3e et 8e ressorts ont privilégié une méthode où les liens de l'enfant avec le pays ont été lus à la lumière de l'intention parentale conjointe.
Le jugement de référence est le suivant : Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 83].

Voir aussi :

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 530] ;

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Dans cette dernière espèce, une distinction a été pratiquée entre la situation d'enfants très jeunes (où une importance plus grande est attachée à l'intention des parents - voir par exemple : Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 808]) et celle d'enfants plus âgés pour lesquels l'intention parentale joue un rôle plus limité.

Approche centrée sur l'intention parentale

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel fédérale du 9e ressort a rendu une décision dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301], qui s'est révélée très influente en exigeant la présence d'une intention ferme d'abandonner une résidence préexistante pour qu'un enfant puisse acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle.

Cette interprétation a été reprise et précisée par d'autres décisions rendues en appel par des juridictions fédérales de sorte qu'en l'absence d'intention commune des parents en cas de départ pour l'étranger, la résidence habituelle a été maintenue dans le pays d'origine, alors même que l'enfant a passé une période longue à l'étranger.  Voir par exemple :

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 777] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour prévu de 4 ans en Allemagne ;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 780] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 32 mois au Mexique ;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT : HC/E/USf 482] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 27 mois en Grèce.

La décision rendue dans l'affaire Mozes a également été approuvée par les cours fédérales d'appel du 2e et du 7e ressort :

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 776] ;

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 878] ;

Il convient de noter que dans l'affaire Mozes, la Cour a reconnu que si suffisamment de temps s'est écoulé et que l'enfant a vécu une expérience positive, la vie de l'enfant peut être si fermement attachée à son nouveau milieu qu'une nouvelle résidence habituelle doit pouvoir y être acquise nonobstant l'intention parentale contraire.

Autres États contractants

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position a évolué :

Autriche
La Cour suprême d'Autriche a décidé qu'une résidence de plus de six mois dans un État sera généralement caractérisée de résidence habituelle, quand bien même elle aurait lieu contre la volonté du gardien de l'enfant (puisqu'il s'agit d'une détermination factuelle du centre de vie).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
Au Québec, au contraire, l'approche est centrée sur l'enfant :
Dans Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 651], la Cour d'appel de Montréal a décidé que la résidence habituelle d'un enfant est simplement une question de fait qui doit s'apprécier à la lumière de toutes les circonstances particulières de l'espèce en fonction de la réalité vécue par l'enfant en question, et non celle de ses parents. Le séjour doit être d'une durée non négligeable (nécessaire au développement de liens par l'enfant et à son intégration dans son nouveau milieu) et continue, aussi l'enfant doit-il avoir un lien réel et actif avec sa résidence; cependant, aucune durée minimale ne peut être formulée.

Allemagne
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort également de la jurisprudence allemande :

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale a ainsi admis qu'une résidence habituelle puisse être acquise bien que l'enfant ait été illicitement déplacé dans le nouvel État de résidence :

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

La Cour constitutionnelle a confirmé l'analyse de la Cour régionale d'appel selon laquelle les enfants avaient acquis leur résidence habituelle en France malgré la nature de leur déplacement là-bas. La Cour a en effet considéré  que la résidence habituelle était un concept factuel, et les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur milieu local pendant les neuf mois qu'ils y avaient vécu.

Israël
Des approches alternatives ont été adoptées lors de la détermination de la résidence habituelle. Il est arrivé qu'un poids important ait été accordé à l'intention parentale. Voir :

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865] ;

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

Cependant, il a parfois été fait référence à une approche plus centrée sur l'enfant. Voir :

décision de la Cour suprême dans C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241 ;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 922].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Contrairement à l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Mozes, la cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Zélande a expressément rejeté l'idée que pour acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, il convient d'avoir l'intention ferme de renoncer à la résidence habituelle précédente. Voir :

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suisse
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort de la jurisprudence suisse :

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Royaume-Uni
L'approche standard est de considérer conjointement la ferme intention des personnes ayant la charge de l'enfant et la réalité vécue par l'enfant.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Pour un commentaire doctrinal des différentes approches du concept de résidence habituelle dans les pays de common law. Voir :

R. Schuz, « Habitual Residence of  Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice », Child and Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 13, No1, 2001, p.1 ;

R. Schuz, « Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context » Journal of Transnational Law and Policy, Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.

Protection du droit de visite

L'article 21 a fait l'objet d'interprétations divergentes. Les États contractants qui privilégient une interprétation littérale considèrent que cette disposition ne crée pas de compétence judiciaire en matière de droit de visite mais se limite à organiser une assistance procédurale de la part des Autorités centrales. D'autres États contractants autorisent l'introduction de procédures judiciaires sur le fondement de l'article 21 en vue de donner effet à un droit de visite préalablement reconnu voire de reconnaître un nouveau droit de visite.

États préférant une interprétation littérale de l'article 21 :

Autriche
S. v. S., 25 May 1998, transcript (official translation), Regional civil court at Graz, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 245].

Allemagne
2 UF 286/97, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 488].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Bromley v. Bromley, 30 F. Supp. 2d 857, 860-61 (E.D. Pa. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 223] ;

Teijeiro Fernandez v. Yeager, 121 F. Supp. 2d 1118, 1125 (W.D. Mich. 2000) ;

Janzik v. Schand, 22 November 2000, United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 463] ;

Wiggill v. Janicki, 262 F. Supp. 2d 687, 689 (S.D.W. Va. 2003) ;

Yi Ly v. Heu, 296 F. Supp. 2d 1009, 1011 (D. Minn. 2003) ;

In re Application of Adams ex. rel. Naik v. Naik, 363 F. Supp. 2d 1025, 1030 (N.D. Ill. 2005) ;

Wiezel v. Wiezel-Tyrnauer, 388 F. Supp. 2d 206 (S.D.N.Y. 2005), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @828@] ;

Cantor v. Cohen, 442 F.3d 196 (4th Cir. 2006), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/USf @827@].

Cette décision est la seule rendue par une juridiction d'appel aux États-Unis d'Amérique concernant l'article 21, mais avec une opinion dissidente selon laquelle la loi mettant en œuvre la Convention en droit américain donne compétence aux juridictions fédérales pour connaître d'une demande concernant l'exercice d'un droit de visite préexistant.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
In Re G. (A Minor) (Enforcement of Access Abroad) [1993] Fam 216 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 110]

Plus récemment, la Cour d'appel anglaise a suggéré dans Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/UKe 809], qu'elle n'était pas imperméable à l'idée de privilégier une interprétation plus large similaire à celle suivie dans d'autres États :

Quoique le juge Hale ait recommandé l'élaboration d'une procédure qui permettrait de faciliter le droit de visite au Royaume-Uni en application de l'article 21 en même temps que d'organiser le retour de l'enfant en application de l'article 12 :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Suisse
Arrondissement judiciaire I Courterlary-Moutier-La Neuveville (Suisse) 11 Octobre 1999 , N° C 99 4313 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 454].

Une interprétation plus permissive de l'article 21 a été adoptée dans d'autres États :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Donofrio v. Burrell, 2000 S.L.T. 1051 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 349].

Une interprétation encore plus large est privilégiée en Nouvelle-Zélande :

Gumbrell v. Jones [2001] NZFLR 593 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 446].

Australie
Director-General, Department of Families Youth & Community Care v. Reissner [1999] FamCA 1238, (1999) 25 Fam LR 330 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 278].