CASE

Download full text FR

Case Name

CA Paris, 15 février 2007, No de RG 06/17206

INCADAT reference

HC/E/FR 979

Court

Country

FRANCE

Name

Cour d'appel de Paris

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Périé (président), Matet et D (conseillers)

States involved

Requesting State

ITALY

Requested State

FRANCE

Decision

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse
French Case Law

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

Brussels IIa Regulation (Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 of 27 November 2003)
Brussels II a Regulation

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application concerned a boy whose habitual residence was in Italy. In August 2005, his mother took him to France. On 19 August, the father requested the child's return. On 8 March 2006, the tribunal de grande instance [court of first instance] of Paris ordered the child's return, providing the parents (who were in agreement) discuss the child's return conditions.

The parents decided that the child would remain in France with his mother until the parents' settlement agreement had been appoved by a court in Italy. On 23 March 2006, the Tribunal de grande instance of Paris upheld the settlement agreement and stated that there was no need to order the child's return. The mother appealed these two judgments.

On 25 January 2007, the Appeal Court of Paris allowed these two appeals and asked the parties to elaborate on the application of article 11 of the Brussels IIa Regulation.

Ruling

Confirmation of the order of 8 March 2006, in that it ordered the child's return; reversal of judgment of 23 March 2006. The removal was wrongful and the return could not be denied on the basis of Article 13 because adequate protection measures had been taken in Italy.

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

- Art. 3
The mother claimed that the father no longer had custody since 3 August, 2005, and that she was not party to the proceedings resulting in the orders of 3 and 5 August in Italy.

The Court observed that although in January and on 3 and 5 August 2005, the Italian jurisdictions granted the child residence with his mother, the two last orders also limited the exercise of parental authority of the two parents for medical and educational aspects (assigning the child to the municipality of Milan) and prohibited the child from leaving the Italian State.

It pointed out that the mother did not seriously contest having had knowledge of the decisions prohibiting the child from leaving the Italian State.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)
The mother argued that the father was violent toward her and that this was traumatizing for the child. In accordance with article 11(4) of the Brussels II a Regulation, the Court noted that the  return could not be denied under Article 13(1)(b) of the Convention if it is established that adequate provisions were taken to ensure the child's protection after his return.

The Court found in that respect that the Italian authorities had taken adequate provisions by entrusting the child to the municipality of Milan and that the Italian ministry of justice had ensured its French counterpart that the judicially established protection measures and support for social workers in Italy would be implemented upon the child's return.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

-

INCADAT comment

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse

Courts have responded in different ways when faced with allegations that the left-behind parent has acted inappropriately or sexually abused the wrongfully removed or retained children. In the most straightforward cases the accusations may simply be dismissed as unfounded. Where this is not possible courts have been divided as to whether a detailed investigation should be undertaken in the State of refuge, or, whether the relevant assessment should be conducted in the State of habitual residence, with interim measures being taken to attempt to protect the child on his return.

- Accusations Dismissed:

Belgium

Civ. Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/BE 706]

The father claimed that the mother sought the return of the child to have her declared mentally incapable and to sell her organs. The Court held, however, that even if the father's accusations were firmly held, they were not backed up by any evidence.
 
Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 666]
 
The Court held that if the mother had serious concerns with regard to her son, then she would not have left him in the care of the father on holiday after what she claimed there had been a serious incident.
 
J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, No 500-04-046027-075 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 968]

The mother claimed that a grave risk arose because the father was a sexual predator.
The Court noted that such allegations had been rejected in foreign proceedings. It equally drew attention to the fact that Convention proceedings concerned the return of the child and not the issue of custody. The fears of the mother and of the maternal grandparents were deemed to be largely irrational. There was also no proof that the judicial authorities in the State of habitual residence were corrupt. The Court instead expressed concerns about the actions of members of the maternal family (who had abducted the child notwithstanding the existence of three court orders to the contrary) as well as the mental state of the mother, who had kept the child in a state of fear of the father.

France
CA Amiens, 4 mars 1998, No de RG 5704759 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 704]

The Court rejected the allegation of physical violence against the father; if there had been violence, it was not of the level required to activate Article 13(1)(b).

New Zealand
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 303]

The Court rejected arguments by the mother that the father's alleged sexual practices would place the child at a grave risk of harm. The Court held that there was no evidence a return would expose the child to the level of harm contemplated under Article 13(1)(b).

Switzerland
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Appellate Court of the Canton Zurich), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 426]

The mother argued that the father was a danger to the children because, inter alia, he had sexually abused the daughter. In rejecting this accusation, the Court noted that the mother had previously been willing to leave the children in the father's sole care whilst she went abroad.

- Return ordered with investigation to be carried out in the State of habitual residence:

United Kingdom - England and Wales

N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 19]

The possible risk to the daughter needed to be investigated in the pending custody proceedings in Australia. In the interim, the child needed protection. However, this protection did not require the refusal of the application for her return. Such risk of physical harm as might exist was created by unsupervised contact to the father, not by return to Australia.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 361]

It was argued that the allegations of sexual abuse by the mother's cohabitee were of such a nature as to activate the Article 13(1)(b) exception. This was rejected by the Court. In doing this the Court noted that the Swedish authorities were aware of the case and had taken steps to ensure that the child would be protected upon her return: she would be placed in an analysis home with her mother. If the mother did not agree to this, the child would be placed in care. The Court also noted that the mother had now separated from her cohabitee.

Finland
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 360]

When considering whether the allegations of the father's sexual abuse of his daughter constituted a barrier to returning the children, the Court noted that one of the objectives of the Hague Child Abduction Convention was that the forum for the determination of custody issues was not to be changed at will and that the credibility of allegations as to the personal characteristics of the petitioner were most properly investigated in the spouses' common State of habitual residence. In addition, the Court noted that a grave risk of harm did not arise if the mother were to return with the children and saw to it that their living conditions were arranged in their best interests. Accordingly, the Court found that there was no barrier to the return of the children.

Ireland
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IE 389]

The Irish Supreme Court accepted that there was prima facie evidence of sexual abuse by the father and that the children should not be returned into his care. However, it found that the trial judge had erred in concluding that this amounted to a grave risk of harm in returning the children to England per se. In the light of the undertakings given by the father, there would be no grave risk in returning the children to live in the former matrimonial home in the sole care of their mother.

- Investigation to be undertaken in the State of refuge:

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/HK 595]

The Court of Appeal criticised the fact that the return order had been made conditional on the acts of a third party (the Swiss Central Authority) over whom China's (Hong Kong SAR) Court had neither jurisdiction nor control. The Court ruled that unless and until the allegations could be discounted altogether or after investigation could be found to have no substance, it was almost inconceivable that the trial court's discretion could reasonably and responsibly be exercised to return the child to the environment in which the alleged abuse took place.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. 2002) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 459]

The Court of Appeals for the First Circuit ruled that great care had to be exercised before returning a child where there existed credible evidence of the child having suffered sexual abuse. It further stated that a court should be particularly wary about using potentially unenforceable undertakings to try to protect a child in such situations.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 971]

The District Court had appointed an independent expert in paediatrics, child abuse, child sexual abuse and child pornography, to assess whether the photographs of the sons constituted child pornography and whether the behaviour problems suffered by the children were indications of sexual abuse. The expert reported that there was no evidence to suggest that the father was a paedophile, that he was sexually aroused by children, or that the pictures were pornographic. The expert approved of the German investigations and stated that they were accurate assessments and that their conclusions were consistent with their reported observations. The expert determined that the symptoms that the boys displayed were consistent with the stress in their lives caused by the acrimonious custody dispute and recommended that the boys not undergo further sexual abuse evaluation because it would increase their already-dangerous stress levels.

- Return Refused:

United Kingdom - Scotland

Q., Petitioner [2001] SLT 243 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 341]

The Court held that there was a possibility that the allegations of abuse were true. It was also possible that the child, if returned, could be allowed into the unsupervised company of the alleged abuser. The Court equally noted that a court in another Hague Convention country would be able to provide adequate protection. Consequently it was possible for a child to be returned where an allegation of sexual abuse had been made. However, on the facts, the Court ruled that in light of what had happened in France during the course of the various legal proceedings, the courts there might not be able or willing to provide adequate protection for the children. Consequently, the risk amounted to a grave risk that the return of the girl would expose her to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place her in an intolerable situation.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 597]

Having found that sexual abuse had occurred, the Court of Appeals ruled that this rendered immaterial the father's arguments that the courts of Sweden could take ameliorative actions to prevent further harm once the children had been returned. The Court of Appeals held that in such circumstances, Article 13(1)(b) did not require separate consideration either of undertakings or of the steps which might be taken by the courts of the country of habitual residence.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

French Case Law

The treatment of Article 13(1) b) by French courts has evolved, with a permissive approach being replaced by a more robust interpretation.

The judgments of France's highest jurisdiction, the Cour de cassation, from the mid to late 1990s, may be contrasted with more recent decisions of the same court and also with decisions of the court of appeal. See:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 juillet 1994, Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt ; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 103];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 21 novembre 1995 (Pourvoi N° 93-20140), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 514];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, (N° de pourvoi : 98-17902), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 498];

And contrast with:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 25 janvier 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 02-17411), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 708];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 juin 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 04-16942), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 844];

Cass. Civ 1ère 13 juillet 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 05-10519), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 845];

CA. Amiens 4 mars 1998, n°5704759, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 704];

CA. Grenoble 29 mars 2000 M. c. F., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

CA. Paris 7 février 2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2001/21768), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 849];

CA. Paris, 20/09/2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2002/13730), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 850];

CA. Aix en Provence 8 octobre 2002, L c. Ministère Public, Mme B. et Mesdemoiselles L. (N° de rôle 02/14917) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 509];

CA. Paris 27 octobre 2005, 05/15032 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 814];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 décembre 2005 (N° de pourvoi :05-12934) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @889@];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 November 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-15692) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @890@].

Recent examples where Article 13(1) b) has been upheld include:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 Décembre 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-22119) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @891@];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 17 Octobre 2007 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @946@]. 

The interpretation given by the Cour d'appel de Rouen in 2006, whilst obiter, does recall the more permissive approach to Article 13(1) b) favoured in the early 1990s, see:

CA. Rouen, 9 Mars 2006, N°05/04340 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @897@].

Brussels II a Regulation

The application of the 1980 Hague Convention within the Member States of the European Union (Denmark excepted) has been amended following the entry into force of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 of 27 November 2003 concerning jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgments in matrimonial matters and the matters of parental responsibility, repealing Regulation (EC) No 1347/2000, see:

Affaire C-195/08 PPU Rinau v. Rinau, [2008] ECR I 5271 [2008] 2 FLR 1495 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 987];

Affaire C 403/09 PPU Detiček v. Sgueglia, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1327].

The Hague Convention remains the primary tool to combat child abductions within the European Union but its operation has been fine tuned.

An autonomous EU definition of ‘rights of custody' has been adopted: Article 2(9) of the Brussels II a Regulation, which is essentially the same as that found in Article 5 a) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention. There is equally an EU formula for determining the wrongfulness of a removal or retention: Article 2(11) of the Regulation. The latter embodies the key elements of Article 3 of the Convention, but adds an explanation as to the joint exercise of custody rights, an explanation which accords with international case law.

See: Case C-400/10 PPU J Mc.B. v. L.E, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

Of greater significance is Article 11 of the Brussels II a Regulation.

Article 11(2) of the Brussels II a Regulation requires that when applying Articles 12 and 13 of the 1980 Hague Convention that the child is given the opportunity to be heard during the proceedings, unless this appears inappropriate having regard to his age or degree of maturity.

This obligation has led to a realignment in judicial practice in England, see:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880] where Baroness Hale noted that the reform would lead to children being heard more frequently in Hague cases than had hitherto happened.

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72,  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901]

The Court of Appeal endorsed the suggestion by Baroness Hale that the requirement under the Brussels II a Regulation to ascertain the views of children of sufficient age of maturity was not restricted to intra-European Community cases of child abduction, but was a principle of universal application.

Article 11(3) of the Brussels II a Regulation requires Convention proceedings to be dealt with within 6 weeks.

Klentzeris v. Klentzeris [2007] EWCA Civ 533, [2007] 2 FLR 996, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 931]

Thorpe LJ held that this extended to appeal hearings and as such recommended that applications for permission to appeal should be made directly to the trial judge and that the normal 21 day period for lodging a notice of appeal should be restricted.

Article 11(4) of the Brussels II a Regulation provides that the return of a child cannot be refused under Article 13(1) b) of the Hague Convention if it is established that adequate arrangements have been made to secure the protection of the child after his return.

Cases in which reliance has been placed on Article 11(4) of the Brussels II a Regulation to make a return order include:

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947];

CA Paris 15 février 2007 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 979].

The relevant protection was found not to exist, leading to a non-return order being made, in:

CA Aix-en-Provence, 30 novembre 2006, N° RG 06/03661 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 717].

The most notable element of Article 11 is the new mechanism which is now applied where a non-return order is made on the basis of Article 13.  This allows the authorities in the State of the child's habitual residence to rule on whether the child should be sent back notwithstanding the non-return order.  If a subsequent return order is made under Article 11(7) of the Regulation, and is certified by the issuing judge, then it will be automatically enforceable in the State of refuge and all other EU-Member States.

Article 11(7) Brussels II a Regulation - Return Order Granted:

Re A. (Custody Decision after Maltese Non-return Order: Brussels II Revised) [2006] EWHC 3397 (Fam.), [2007] 1 FLR 1923 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 883]

Article 11(7) Brussels II a Regulation - Return Order Refused:

Re A. H.A. v. M.B. (Brussels II Revised: Article 11(7) Application) [2007] EWHC 2016 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 289, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 930].

The CJEU has ruled that a subsequent return order does not have to be a final order for custody:

Case C-211/10 PPU Povse v. Alpago, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1328].

In this case it was further held that the enforcement of a return order cannot be refused as a result of a change of circumstances.  Such a change must be raised before the competent court in the Member State of origin.

Furthermore abducting parents may not seek to subvert the deterrent effect of Council Regulation 2201/2003 in seeking to obtain provisional measures to prevent the enforcement of a custody order aimed at securing the return of an abducted child:

Case C 403/09 PPU Detiček v. Sgueglia, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1327].

For academic commentary on the new EU regime see:

P. McEleavy ‘The New Child Abduction Regime in the European Community: Symbiotic Relationship or Forced Partnership?' [2005] Journal of Private International Law 5 - 34.

Faits

La demande concernait un garçon dont la résidence habituelle était en Italie. En août 2005, sa mère l'emmena en France. Dès le 19 août, le père demanda le retour de l'enfant. Le 8 mars 2006, le tribunal de grande instance de Paris ordonna le retour de l'enfant, étant entendu que les parents (qui étaient d'accord) devaient discuter les conditions du retour de celui-ci.

Les parents décidèrent que l'enfant resterait en France avec sa mère jusqu'à ce qu'un jugement d'homologation entérine en Italie le protocole d'accord des parents. Le 23 mars 2006, le TGI de Paris entérina le protocole d'accord et dit n'y avoir lieu à ordonner le retour de l'enfant. La mère forma appel de ces deux jugements.

Le 25 janvier 2007, la Cour d'appel de Paris déclara ces appels recevables et invita les parties à s'expliquer sur l'application de l'article 11 du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis.

Dispositif

Confirmation de l'ordonnance du 8 mars 2006 en ce qu'elle ordonnait le retour; réformation du surplus et infirmation du jugement du 23 mars 2006. Le déplacement était illicite et le retour ne pouvait être refusé sur le fondement de l'article 13 car des mesures de protection adéquates avaient été prévues en Italie.

Motifs

Droit de garde - art. 3


La mère prétendait que le père n'avait plus la garde de l'enfant depuis le 3 août 2005 et qu'elle n'avait pas été partie à la procédure ayant donné lieu aux ordonnaces des 3 et 5 août en Italie.

La Cour observa que les juridictions italiennes avaient en janvier et les 3 et 5 août 2005 certes accordé la résidence de l'enfant à la mère mais, par les deux dernières ordonnances, avaient également restreint l'exercice de l'autorité parentale des deux parents pour les aspects sanitaires et éducatifs (assignant l'enfant à la municipalité de Milan) et interdit la sortie du territoire italien par l'enfant.

Elle souligna que la mère n'avait pas séreusement contesté avoir eu connaissance des décisions interdisant le départ de l'enfant du territoire italien.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)


La mère faisait valoir que le père était violent à son encontre et que cela était traumatisant pour l'enfant. Visant l'article 11(4) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis, la Cour rappela que le retour ne peut être refusé en vertu de l'article 13 alinéa 1 b de la Convention s'il est étabi que des dispositions adéquates ont été rises pour assurer la protection de l'enfant après son retour.

La Cour constata à cet égard que les autorités italiennes avaient pris des dispositions adéquates en confiant l'enfant à la municipalité de Milan et que le Ministère de la justice italien avait assuré à son homologue français que les mesures de protection et le soutien des travailleurs sociaux prévus judiciairement en Italie seraient mis en place au retour de l'enfant.

Commentaire INCADAT

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.

Allégations de mauvais traitement et abus sexuel

Les tribunaux ont adopté des positions variables lorsqu'ils ont été confrontés à des allégations selon lesquelles le parent délaissé avait fait subir des mauvais traitements ou abus sexuels à l'enfant déplacé ou retenu illicitement. Dans les affaires les plus simples, les accusations ont pu être rejetées comme non fondées. Lorsqu'il n'était pas évident que l'allégation était manifestement non fondée, les tribunaux se sont montrés divisés quant à savoir si une enquête poussée devait être menée dans l'État de refuge ou bien dans l'État de la résidence habituelle, auquel cas des mesures de protection provisoires seraient prises en vue de protéger l'enfant en cas de retour.

- Accusations déclarées non fondées :

Belgique

Civ Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 706]

Le père prétendait que la mère ne voulait le retour de l'enfant que pour la faire déclarer folle et vendre ses organes. Toutefois, le juge releva que si les déclarations du père relevaient d'une profonde conviction, elles n'étaient pas étayées d'éléments de preuve.

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 666]

La Cour décida que si la mère avait eu des craintes sérieuses à propos de son fils, elle ne l'aurait pas laissé aux soins du père pendant les vacances, après ce qu'elle présentait comme un incident sérieux.

J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, N°500-04-046027-075 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 968]

La mère faisait valoir un risque grave au motif que le père était un prédateur sexuel. La Cour rappela que toutes les procédures étrangères avaient rejeté ces allégations, et indiqua qu'il fallait garder en mémoire que la question posée était celle du retour et non de la garde. Elle constata que les craintes de la mère et de ses parents étaient largement irraisonnées, et que la preuve de la corruption des autorités judiciaires de l'État de résidence habituelle n'était pas davantage rapportée. La Cour exprima au contraire une crainte face à la réaction de la famille de la mère (rappelant qu'ils avaient enlevé l'enfant en dépit de 3 interdictions judiciaires de ce faire), ainsi qu'une critique concernant les capacités mentales de la mère, qui avait maintenu l'enfant dans un climat de peur de son père.

France
CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° RG 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation de violence physique du père à l'égard de l'enfant. S'il pouvait y avoir eu des épisodes violents, ils n'étaient pas de nature à caractériser le risque nécessaire à l'application de l'article 13(1)(b).

Nouvelle Zélande
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 303]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation selon laquelle les habitudes sexuelles du père étaient de nature à causer un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant. Elle ajouta que la preuve n'avait pas été apportée que le retour exposerait l'enfant à un risque tel que l'article 13(1)(b) serait applicable.

Suisse
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Cour d'appel du canton de Zurich) (Suisse), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 426]

La mère prétendait que le père constituait un danger pour les enfants parce qu'il avait entre autres abusé sexuellement de l'enfant. Pour rejeter cet argument, la Cour fit observer que la mère avait jusqu'alors laissé l'enfant vivre seul avec son père pendant qu'elle voyageait à l'étranger.

Retour ordonné et enquête à mener dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 19]

Le risque encouru par l'enfant devait faire l'objet d'une enquête dans le cadre de la procédure de garde en cours en Australie.  Il convenait de protéger l'enfant jusqu'à la conclusion de cette enquête. Toutefois cette nécessité de protection ne devait pas mener au rejet de la demande de retour car le risque était lié non pas au retour en Australie mais à un droit de visite et d'hébergement non surveillé.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 361]

La Cour rejeta les allégations selon lesquelles l'enfant était victime d'abus sexuels de la part du concubin de la mère de nature à déclencher le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b). Pour rejeter l'application de l'article 13(1)(b), la Cour avait relevé que les autorités suédoises étaient conscientes de ce risque d'abus et avaient pris des mesures précises de nature à protéger l'enfant à son retour : elle serait placée dans un foyer d'analyse avec sa mère. Si la mère refusait, alors l'enfant serait ôtée à sa famille et placée dans un foyer. Elle fit également remarquer que la mère s'était séparée de son concubin.

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 360]

Lors de son analyse concernant la question de savoir si l'allégation selon laquelle le père aurait abusé sexuellement de sa fille constituait une barrière au retour de l'enfant, la Cour a fait observer, d'une part, qu'un des objectifs de la Convention de La Haye était d'empêcher que le for devant se prononcer sur le retour de l'enfant soit choisi arbitrairement. La Cour observa, d'autre part, que la crédibilité des allégations devrait être analysée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle des époux car il s'agissait de l'État le mieux placé, et qu'aucun risque grave de danger n'existait si la mère accompagnait les enfants et organisait des conditions de vie dans leur meilleur intérêt. Dans ces conditions le retour pouvait être ordonné.

Irlande
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 389]

La Cour suprême irlandaise a noté qu'à première vue la preuve avait été apportée que les enfants avaient été victimes d'abus sexuels de la part du père et ne devaient pas être placés sous sa garde. Cependant, le tribunal avait estimé à tort que le retour des enfants en lui-même constituerait un risque grave. Au vu des engagements pris par le père, il n'y aurait pas de risque grave à renvoyer les enfants dans leur foyer familial sous la seule garde de la mère.

- Enquête à mener dans l'État de refuge :

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 595]

La Cour d'appel critiqua le fait que le retour était soumis à une condition sur laquelle les juridictions de la Chine (RAS Hong Kong) n'avaient aucun contrôle (ni aucune compétence). La condition posée étant l'action d'un tiers (l'Autorité centrale suisse). La Cour estima que jusqu'à ce que les allégations se révèlent dénuées de fondement, il n'était pas admissible que la cour, dans l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire, décide de renvoyer l'enfant dans le milieu dans lequel les abus s'étaient produits.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir.2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 459]

La Cour d'appel du premier ressort estima que le premier juge aurait dû faire preuve d'une grande prudence avant de renvoyer un enfant alors même qu'il y avait de sérieuses raisons de croire qu'il avait fait l'objet d'abus sexuels. La Cour d'appel ajouta que les juges devaient se montrer particulièrement prudents dans leur tentative de garantir la protection de l'enfant par la voie d'engagements dans des situations analogues.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 971]

Le Tribunal fédéral avait demandé à un pédiatre spécialisé dans les questions de maltraitance, d'abus sexuels sur enfants et de pédopornographie de se prononcer sur la question de savoir si les photos des enfants constituaient des photos pornographiques et si les troubles comportementaux des enfants traduisaient un abus sexuel. L'expert conclut qu'aucun élément ne permettait de déduire que le père était pédophile, qu'il était attiré sexuellement par des enfants ni que les photos étaient pornographiques. Elle approuva l'enquête allemande et constata que les conclusions allemandes étaient conformes aux observations effectuées. Elle ajouta que les symptômes développés par les enfants étaient causés par le stress que la séparation très difficile des parents leur causait. Elle ajouta encore que les enfants ne devaient pas être soumis à d'autres évaluations en vue d'établir un abus sexuel car cela ne ferait qu'ajouter à leur niveau de stress déjà dangereusement élevé.

- Retour refusé :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Q., Petitioner, [2001] SLT 243, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 341]

Le juge estima qu'il était possible que les allégations d'abus fussent exactes. De même, il n'était pas impossible qu'en cas de retour, l'enfant puisse être amené à avoir un contact non surveillé avec l'auteur potentiel de ces abus. Elle observa toutefois que les autorités d'autres États parties à la Convention de La Haye sont susceptibles de fournir une protection adéquate à l'enfant. En conséquence, le retour d'un enfant pouvait être ordonné même en cas d'allégations d'abus sexuels. En l'espèce cependant, le juge estima qu'au regard des différentes procédures ouvertes en France, il semblait que les juridictions compétentes n'étaient pas en mesure de protéger l'enfant, ou pas disposées à le faire. Elle en a déduit que le retour de l'enfant l'exposerait à un risque grave de danger physique ou psychologique ou la placerait de toute autre manière dans une situation intolérable.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 597]

Ces conclusions rendaient inopérants les arguments du père selon lequel les autorités suédoises pourraient prendre des mesures pour limiter tout danger supplémentaire une fois les enfants rentrées dans ce pays. La Cour d'appel décida qu'en ces circonstances, l'application de l'article 13(1)(b) n'exigeait pas que la question des engagements du père soit posée, pas davantage que celle des mesures à prendre par les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle.

(Auteur : Peter McEleavy, Avril 2013)

Jurisprudence française

Le traitement de l'article 13(1) b) a évolué. L'interprétation permissive initialement privilégiée par les cours a fait place à une interprétation plus stricte.

Les jugements de la plus haute juridiction française, la Cour de cassation, rendus du milieu à la fin des années 1990 contrastent avec la position des juridictions d'appel et des arrêts de cassation plus récents. Voir :

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 juillet 1994, Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt ; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 103] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 21 novembre 1995 (Pourvoi N° 93-20140), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 514] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, (N° de pourvoi : 98-17902), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 498] ;

Et comparer avec:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 25 janvier 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 02-17411), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 708] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 juin 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 04-16942), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 844] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 13 juillet 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 05-10519), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 845] ;

CA. Amiens 4 mars 1998, n°5704759, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704] ;

CA. Grenoble 29 mars 2000 M. c. F., [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

CA. Paris 7 février 2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2001/21768), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 849] ;

CA. Paris, 20/09/2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2002/13730), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 850] ;

CA. Aix en Provence 8 octobre 2002, L c. Ministère Public, Mme B. et Mesdemoiselles L. (N° de rôle 02/14917) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 509] ;

CA. Paris 27 octobre 2005, 05/15032 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 décembre 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 05-12934) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @889@] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 November 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-15692) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @890@].

Pour des exemples récents où le retour a été refusé sur le fondement de l'article 13(1) b) :

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 Décembre 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-22119) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @891@] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 17 Octobre 2007 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @946@]. 

L'interprétation donnée à l'article 13(1) b) par la Cour d'appel de Rouen en 2006, quoique simplement obiter, rappelle l'interprétation permissive qui était constante au début des années 1990. Voir :

CA. Rouen, 9 Mars 2006, N°05/04340 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @897@].

Règlement Bruxelles II bis

76;2201/2203 (BRUXELLES II BIS)

L'application de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 dans les États membres de l'Union européenne (excepté le Danemark) a fait l'objet d'un amendement à la suite de l'entrée en vigueur du Règlement (CE) n°2201/2003 du Conseil du 27 novembre 2003 relatif à la compétence, la reconnaissance et l'exécution des décisions en matière matrimoniale et en matière de responsabilité parentale abrogeant le règlement (CE) n°1347/2000. Voir :

Affaire C-195/08 PPU Rinau v. Rinau, [2008] ECR I 5271 [2008] 2 FLR 1495 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 987];

Affaire C 403/09 PPU Detiček v. Sgueglia, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1327].

La Convention de La Haye reste l'instrument majeur de lutte contre les enlèvements d'enfants, mais son application est précisée et complétée.

L'article 11(2) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis exige que dans le cadre de l'application des articles 12 et 13 de la Convention de La Haye, l'occasion doit être donnée à l'enfant d'être entendu pendant la procédure sauf lorsque cela s'avère inapproprié eu égard à son jeune âge ou son immaturité.

Cette obligation a donné lieu à un changement dans la jurisprudence anglaise :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Dans cette espèce le juge Hale indiqua que désormais les enfants seraient plus fréquemment auditionnés dans le cadre de l'application de la Convention de La Haye.

L'article 11(4) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis prévoit que : « Une juridiction ne peut pas refuser le retour de l'enfant en vertu de l'article 13, point b), de la convention de La Haye de 1980 s'il est établi que des dispositions adéquates ont été prises pour assurer la protection de l'enfant après son retour. »

Décisions ayant tiré les conséquences de l'article 11(4) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis pour ordonner le retour de l'enfant :

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 947];

CA Paris 15 février 2007 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 979].

Il convient de noter que le Règlement introduit un nouveau mécanisme applicable lorsqu'une ordonnance de non-retour est rendue sur la base de l'article 13. Les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant ont la possibilité de rendre une décision contraignante sur la question de savoir si l'enfant doit retourner dans cet État nonobstant une ordonnance de non-retour. Si une telle décision de l'article 11(7) du Règlement est en effet rendue et certifiée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle, elle deviendra automatiquement exécutoire dans l'État de refuge ainsi que dans tous les États Membres.

Décision de retour de l'Article 11(7) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis rendue :

Re A. (Custody Decision after Maltese Non-return Order: Brussels II Revised) [2006] EWHC 3397 (Fam.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 883].

Décision de retour de l'Article 11(7) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis refusée :

Re A. H.A. v. M.B. (Brussels II Revised: Article 11(7) Application) [2007] EWHC 2016 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 289 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 930].

Voir le commentaire de :

P. McEleavy, « The New Child Abduction Regime in the European Community: Symbiotic Relationship or Forced Partnership? », Journal of Private International Law, 2005, p. 5 à 34.