CASE

Download full text FR

Case Name

Cass Civ 1ère, 26 octobre 2011, Nº de pourvoi 10-19.905, 1015

INCADAT reference

HC/E/FR 1130

Court

Country

FRANCE

Name

Cour de cassation, première chambre civile

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Charruault (pdt)

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

FRANCE

Decision

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Habitual Residence
Can a Child be left without a Habitual Residence?
Relocations

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
French Case Law

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The case concerned two children of a Franco-American married couple. The elder child was born in Michigan in 2005. In November 2007, the mother, expecting her second child, went to France with her elder daughter to visit her dying father. She stayed in France after his death, and gave birth to a boy there 3 months later, in February 2008.

On 13 March 2008, the father applied for the children's return. The application was allowed at first instance in October 2008, and the Court of Appeal of Lyon (Cour d'appel de Lyon) upheld the return decision in December 2008. The mother appealed to the Cour de Cassation.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed; the Court of Appeal had rightly found the children's retention to be wrongful and the exceptions inapplicable.

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3

The mother denied that her baby born in France could be considered as having his habitual residence in the United States of America. The Cour de Cassation held that the Court of Appeal, by a reasoned decision, had found that both parents, having joint and full parental authority, had their habitual residence in the United States of America and that residence could not change owing solely to their baby's birth in France and the mother's unilateral wish to reside there.

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12

Several complaints by the mother related to the Convention's applicability to the baby born in February 2008: in her view, that child could not have been removed since he had been born in France and had never been to the United States of America. The Cour de Cassation found that the Court of Appeal could rightly deduce a wrongful retention from the facts that both parents had their habitual residence in the United States of America and that the father had only allowed the mother to travel to France temporarily.

Acquiescence - Art. 13(1)(a)

The mother further claimed that the Court of Appeal should have replied to the plea of the father's acquiescence and had failed to do so. The Cour de Cassation pointed out that the Court of Appeal had noted that the father had not allowed the mother to move to France with the children but had merely "consented to temporary travel, limited in time".

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The mother considered that the return would expose the children to a hazard; she complained in particular that the Court of Appeal had considered that the mother herself had exposed her children to a hazard by a wrongful removal and that the father was acting in the children's best interests, and she stressed the need to draw the consequences of a proven risk.

She added that the Court of Appeal should have determined whether the elder child, aged 4, would not be exposed to a grave risk since she had lived in France for over a year, but also whether separating the younger child aged 10 months from his mother did not expose him to a mental risk.

The Cour de Cassation dismissed these claims, stating that the Court of Appeal had noted that "both parents were able to provide the children with decent education and living conditions and the mother could not assert any danger for her children whereas by her own action, she had put them in emotional and mental danger by removing them from their father".

Procedural Matters

The Court of Appeal had found that the copy of a letter discovered by the mother mentioned only the elder child, but was supplemented by a letter from the requested Central Authority stating "unambiguously that the application for return sent to the French Central Authority by the American Central Authority related to both the couple's children".

The mother disputed the extent of the referral to the Court, stating that a letter from the requested Central Authority was inadequate to define the extent of that referral by the requesting Central Authority. The Cour de Cassation noted, however, that the Court of Appeal, approving the lower court's reasons, had found that the initiating instrument did refer to both children.

Author of summary: Aude Fiorini

INCADAT comment

Can a Child be left without a Habitual Residence?

In early Convention case law there was a clear reluctance on the part of appellate courts to find that a child did not have a habitual residence.  This was because of the concern that such a conclusion would render the instrument inoperable, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 40];

Australia
Cooper v. Casey (1995) FLC 92-575 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 104].

However, in more recent years there has been a recognition that situations do exist where it is not possible to regard a child as being habitually resident anywhere:

Australia
D.W. & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2006] FamCA 93, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 870].

In this case the majority accepted that their decision could be said to deny the child of the benefit of the Convention. However, the majority argued that the interests of children generally could be adversely affected if courts were too willing to find that a parent who had attempted a reconciliation in a foreign country, was to be found, together with the child, to have become "habitually resident" in that foreign country.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
W. and B. v. H. (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) [2002] 1 FLR 1008 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 470];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Robertson v. Robertson 1998 SLT 468 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 194];

D. v. D. 2002 SC 33 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 351];

New Zealand
S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 816];

United States of America
Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 529];

Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (2005) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/US 797].

Relocations

Where there is clear evidence of an intention to commence a new life in another State then the existing habitual residence will be lost and a new one acquired.

In common law jurisdictions it is accepted that acquisition may be able to occur within a short period of time, see:

Canada
DeHaan v. Gracia [2004] AJ No.94 (QL), [2004] ABQD 4, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 576];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 2];

Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 40].

In civil law jurisdictions it has been held that a new habitual residence may be acquired immediately, see:

Switzerland
Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) Décision du 15 novembre 2005, 5P.367/2005 /ast, [INCADAT cite : HC/E/CH 841].

Conditional Relocations 

Where parental agreement as regards relocation is conditional on a future event, should an existing habitual residence be lost immediately upon leaving that country? 

Australia
The Full Court of the Family Court of Australia answered this question in the negative and further held that loss may not even follow from the fulfilment of the condition if the parent who aspires to relocate does not clearly commit to the relocation at that time, see:

Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 995].

However, this ruling was overturned on appeal by the High Court of Australia, which held that an existing habitual residence would be lost if the purpose had a sufficient degree of continuity to be described as settled.  There did not need to be a settled intention to take up ‘long term' residence:

L.K. v. Director-General Department of Community Services [2009] HCA 9, (2009) 253 ALR 202, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1012].

French Case Law

The treatment of Article 13(1) b) by French courts has evolved, with a permissive approach being replaced by a more robust interpretation.

The judgments of France's highest jurisdiction, the Cour de cassation, from the mid to late 1990s, may be contrasted with more recent decisions of the same court and also with decisions of the court of appeal. See:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 juillet 1994, Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt ; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 103];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 21 novembre 1995 (Pourvoi N° 93-20140), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 514];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, (N° de pourvoi : 98-17902), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 498];

And contrast with:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 25 janvier 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 02-17411), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 708];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 juin 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 04-16942), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 844];

Cass. Civ 1ère 13 juillet 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 05-10519), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 845];

CA. Amiens 4 mars 1998, n°5704759, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 704];

CA. Grenoble 29 mars 2000 M. c. F., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

CA. Paris 7 février 2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2001/21768), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 849];

CA. Paris, 20/09/2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2002/13730), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 850];

CA. Aix en Provence 8 octobre 2002, L c. Ministère Public, Mme B. et Mesdemoiselles L. (N° de rôle 02/14917) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 509];

CA. Paris 27 octobre 2005, 05/15032 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 814];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 décembre 2005 (N° de pourvoi :05-12934) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @889@];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 November 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-15692) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @890@].

Recent examples where Article 13(1) b) has been upheld include:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 Décembre 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-22119) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @891@];

Cass. Civ. 1ère 17 Octobre 2007 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @946@]. 

The interpretation given by the Cour d'appel de Rouen in 2006, whilst obiter, does recall the more permissive approach to Article 13(1) b) favoured in the early 1990s, see:

CA. Rouen, 9 Mars 2006, N°05/04340 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR @897@].

Faits

L'affaire concernait deux enfants issus d'un couple franco-américain marié. L'aînée était née au Michigan en 2005. En novembre 2007, la mère, enceinte de son deuxième enfant, alla en France avec sa fille aînée afin de rendre visite à son père mourant. Elle resta en France après le décès de celui-ci et y accoucha 3 mois plus tard, en février 2008, d'un petit garçon.

Le 13 mars 2008, le père demanda le retour des enfants. La demande fut accueillie en première instance en octobre 2008 et la Cour d'appel de Lyon confirma l'ordonnance de retour en décembre 2008. La mère forma un recours en cassation.

Dispositif

Recours rejeté; la Cour d'appel avait à bon droit constaté l'illicéité du non-retour des enfants et l'inapplicabilité des exceptions.

Motifs

Résidence habituelle - art. 3

La mère contestait que son bébé né en France puisse être considéré comme ayant sa résidence habituelle aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique. La Cour de cassation considéra que la Cour d'appel avait, par décision motivée, considéré que les deux parents, disposant conjointement et pleinement de l'autorité parentale, avaient leur résidence habituelle aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique et que cette résidence ne pouvait changer du seul fait de la naissance en France de leur bébé et de la volonté unilatérale de la mère d'y demeurer.

Déplacement et non-retour - art. 3 et 12

Plusieurs griefs de la mère concernait l'applicabilité de la Convention au regard du bébé né en février 2008: selon elle, cet enfant ne pouvait avoir été victime d'un déplacement puisqu'il était né en France et n'était jamais allé aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique.

La Cour de cassation indiqua que la Cour d'appel avait bien pu déduire l'existence d'un non-retour illicite du fait que les deux parents avaient leur résidence habituelle aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique et de ce que le père avait seulement autorisé la mère à un déplacement ponctuel en France.

Acquiescement - art. 13(1)(a)

La mère faisait encore valoir que la Cour d'appel aurait dû répondre au grief d'acquiescement du père, ce qu'elle n'avait pas fait. La Cour de cassation souligna que la Cour d'appel avait relevé que le père n'avait pas autorisé la mère à s'installer avec les enfants en France mais avait seulement « consenti à un déplacement ponctuel limité dans le temps ».

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)

La mère estimait que le retour exposerait les enfants à un danger; elle critiquait notamment la Cour d'appel pour avoir considéré que la mère avait elle-même exposé ses enfants à un danger en effectuant un déplacement illicite et que le père agissait dans l'intérêt supérieur des enfants, et elle soulignait la nécessité de tirer les conséquences d'un danger avéré.

Elle ajoutait que la Cour aurait dû rechercher si l'aînée des enfants, de l'âge de 4 ans, ne serait pas exposée à un risque grave puisqu'elle vivait en France depuis plus d'un an mais également si séparer le cadet de 10 mois de sa mère ne présentait pas un danger psychique pour lui.

La Cour de cassation rejeta ces griefs, indiquant que la Cour d'appel avait relevé que « les deux parents étaient en mesure de prodiguer aux enfants une éducation et des conditions de vie décentes et que la mère ne pouvait se prévaloir d'aucun danger pour ses enfants alors même qu'elle les avait, de son fait, placés en danger affectif et moral en les éloignant de leur père ».

Questions procédurales

La Cour d'appel avait constaté que la copie d'un courrier produit par la mère ne visait que l'aînée des enfants, mais que ce document était complété par un courrier émanant de l'Autorité centrale requise indiquant « sans ambiguïté possible que la demande de retour adressée à l'Autorité centrale française par l'Autorité centrale américaine concernait les deux enfants du couple ».

La mère contestait l'étendue de la saisine de la Cour, indiquant qu'un courrier de l'Autorité centrale requise était impropre à établir l'étendue de la saisine de celle-ci par l'Autorité centrale requérante. La Cour de cassation releva toutefois que par motifs adoptés, la Cour d'appel avait retenu que l'acte introductif d'instance visait bien les deux enfants.

Auteur du résumé : Aude Fiorini

Commentaire INCADAT

Un enfant peut-il se trouver sans résidence habituelle?

Dans la jurisprudence conventionnelle ancienne, les cours se sont montrées peu enclines à admettre qu'un enfant puisse se trouver sans résidence habituelle, notamment en raison du fait qu'une telle conclusion rendait inapplicable la Convention, voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 40];

Australie
Cooper v. Casey (1995) FLC 92-575 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 104].

Toutefois, plus récemment on constate que les cours reconnaissent qu'il y a des situations dans lesquelles il est impossible d'admettre que l'enfant a une résidence habituelle quelque part.

D.W. & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2006] FamCA 93, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 870].

Dans cette affaire, la majorité des juges a estimé que certes leur conclusion empêchait l'application de la Convention mais a souligné que l'intérêt des enfants pouvait pâtir d'une trop grande propension des tribunaux à admettre que le parent ayant tenté de se réconcilier avec l'autre parent en vivant avec lui à l'étranger afin de donner à l'enfant une famille biparentale doit, avec l'enfant, avoir acquis une résidence habituelle dans cet État.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
W. and B. v. H. (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) [2002] 1 FLR 1008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 470] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Robertson v. Robertson 1998 SLT 468 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 194] ;

D. v. D. 2002 SC 33 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 351] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 816] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 529] ;

Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 797].

Déménagement ou Installation à l'étranger

Lorsqu'une intention de s'installer à l'étranger pour y commencer un nouveau chapitre de sa vie est établie, la résidence habituelle préexistante va être perdue et une nouvelle résidence habituelle pourra rapidement être acquise.

Dans les pays de common law, il est admis que cette acquisition peut survenir rapidement, voir :

Canada
DeHaan v. Gracia [2004] AJ No.94 (QL), [2004] ABQD 4 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 576];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 2];

Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [1992] Fam Law 195 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 40]

Dans les pays de droit civil, il a été admis qu'une résidence habituelle peut être acquise immédiatement, voir:
 
Suisse
5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Déménagements soumis à une condition future

Si l'accord des parents concernant le déménagement est soumis à une condition future, la résidence habituelle qui existait avant le déménagement est-elle perdue immédiatement lors du déménagement ?

Australie

Le tribunal familial australien (the Family Court of Australia) siégeant en séance plénière a répondu par la négative à cette question et a également déclaré que la perte de la résidence habituelle pouvait même ne pas découler de la réalisation de la condition en question, si à ce moment-là le parent désirant déménager ne s'engage pas clairement à déménager :

Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 995].

Cependant, cette décision a été renversée en appel par la Haute Cour d'Australie, qui a considéré qu'une résidence habituelle existante pouvait être perdue si la volonté de déménager présentait un degré suffisant de continuité pour être décrite comme ferme. Il n'était donc pas nécessaire d'avoir une ferme intention d'établir sa résidence sur le « long terme ».

L.K. v. Director-General Department of Community Services [2009] HCA 9, (2009) 253 ALR 202, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1012].

Jurisprudence française

Le traitement de l'article 13(1) b) a évolué. L'interprétation permissive initialement privilégiée par les cours a fait place à une interprétation plus stricte.

Les jugements de la plus haute juridiction française, la Cour de cassation, rendus du milieu à la fin des années 1990 contrastent avec la position des juridictions d'appel et des arrêts de cassation plus récents. Voir :

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 juillet 1994, Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt ; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 103] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 21 novembre 1995 (Pourvoi N° 93-20140), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 514] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, (N° de pourvoi : 98-17902), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 498] ;

Et comparer avec:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 25 janvier 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 02-17411), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 708] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 juin 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 04-16942), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 844] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 13 juillet 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 05-10519), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 845] ;

CA. Amiens 4 mars 1998, n°5704759, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704] ;

CA. Grenoble 29 mars 2000 M. c. F., [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

CA. Paris 7 février 2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2001/21768), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 849] ;

CA. Paris, 20/09/2002 (N° de pourvoi : 2002/13730), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 850] ;

CA. Aix en Provence 8 octobre 2002, L c. Ministère Public, Mme B. et Mesdemoiselles L. (N° de rôle 02/14917) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 509] ;

CA. Paris 27 octobre 2005, 05/15032 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 décembre 2005 (N° de pourvoi : 05-12934) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @889@] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 14 November 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-15692) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @890@].

Pour des exemples récents où le retour a été refusé sur le fondement de l'article 13(1) b) :

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12 Décembre 2006 (N° de pourvoi : 05-22119) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @891@] ;

Cass. Civ. 1ère 17 Octobre 2007 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @946@]. 

L'interprétation donnée à l'article 13(1) b) par la Cour d'appel de Rouen en 2006, quoique simplement obiter, rappelle l'interprétation permissive qui était constante au début des années 1990. Voir :

CA. Rouen, 9 Mars 2006, N°05/04340 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR @897@].