CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

Norinder v. Fuentes, 657 F.3d 526 (7th Cir. 2011)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/US 1138

Court

Country

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Name

United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Manion, Wood, Hamilton (Circuit Judges)

States involved

Requesting State

SWEDEN

Requested State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Decision

Date

6 September 2011

Status

Final

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3 | Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Procedural Matters

Order

Appeal dismissed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(1)(b)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010); Altamiranda Vale v. Avila, 538 F.3d 581, (7th Cir. 2008); Shalit v. Coppe, 182 F.3d 1124 (9th Cir. 1999); Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir. 1996); Kijowska v. Haines, 463 F.3d 583 (7th Cir. 2006); Pielage v. McConnell, 516 F.3d 1282 (11th Cir. 2008); Cantor v. Cohen, 442 F.3d 196 (4th Cir. 2006); March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001). Cuellar v. Joyce, 596 F.3d 505 (9th Cir. 2010); Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (7th Cir. 2006); Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067(9th Cir. 2001); Baran v. Beaty, 526 F.3d 1340, (11th Cir. 2008); Walsh v. Walsh, 221 F.3d 204 (1st Cir. 2000); Simcox v. Simcox, 511 F.3d 594, (6th Cir. 2007); Whallon v. Lynn, 356 F.3d 138, (1st Cir. 2004); Rydder v. Rydder, 49 F.3d 369, (8th Cir. 1995).

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Habitual Residence
Habitual Residence

Implementation & Application Issues

Procedural Matters
Costs

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The proceedings related to a child born in the United States of America in February 2008 to an American mother and a Swedish father. The parents were married. In July 2008 the family moved to Sweden. The purpose of the move was ultimately the subject of dispute between the parents. The parents' relationship in Sweden was difficult and on a number of occasions the mother moved out of the family home.

On 17 March 2010 the mother took the child to the United States of America for a two week vacation. On 7 April, the scheduled return day, the mother advised the father that she and the child would be remaining in the United States. After a month of searching, the father located the mother and on 26 May 2010 he filed a return petition.

On 23 July 2010 the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois ordered the return of the child to Sweden. On 17 November 2010 the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois ordered that the mother pay 150,570 US Dollars costs to the father. The mother appealed both the return order and the issue of costs.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and return ordered; the child was habitually resident in Sweden at the time of the retention and the standard required under Art. 13(1)(b) of the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention to establish a grave risk of harm had not been met.

Grounds

Habitual Residence - Art. 3


The Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit noted it had adopted a version of the analysis of habitual residence set out by the Ninth Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001). The question was whether a prior place of residence (in this case, the United States of America) was effectively abandoned and a new residence established (here, Sweden) "by the shared actions and intent of the parents coupled with the passage of time."

In the light of the evidence, the Court rejected the mother's arguments that she never shared the intention to abandon the United States as her and the child's habitual residence (80% of possessions shipped, permanent residency secured, Swedish lessons undertaken, no residence retained in United States). The intention or hope to return does not prevent a new residence from being established.

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)


The mother argued that the father posed a grave risk of harm to the child. In this she held that the couple had had several serious fights, during one incident the father had thrown the child to the ground and the father was addicted to prescription drugs and abused alcohol. The father disputed these allegations which had been rejected by the trial court.

The Court held that the past fights were best regarded as "minor domestic squabbles" rather than anything detrimental to the child. It added that because the issue underlying a Convention application was the determination of which forum should adjudicate the domestic dispute and not resolving the dispute itself, the risk must truly be grave. "Clear and convincing evidence" must be presented because "any more lenient standard would create a situation where the exception would swallow the rule."

The Court accepted the assessment of the trial court that the father had never thrown the child on the ground and whatever drinking and drug problems had existed, they did not affect the outcome.

Procedural Matters

Discovery:
The mother argued that the trial court had improperly cut off her pre-trial discovery which in turn undermined her ability to show that the father posed a grave risk of harm to the child. The Court of Appeals considered the actions of the mother's legal team and of the trial judge, noting, inter alia, that additional discovery was requested for the first time on the day before the scheduled trial date and the trial judge asked the father to execute a waiver for the release of medical and other records the mother wished to obtain (the father subsequently produced medical and employment records, but not documents relating to past prescription use).

The Court of Appeals held that the issue was whether the trial court's decision to deny additional discovery was an abuse of discretion. It noted that a decision would only be reversed if it resulted in actual and substantial prejudice. The Court accepted that the denial of a continuance was the correct decision because of the time-sensitive nature of the case.

It noted that courts had leeway to limit discovery in many circumstances where the additional discovery would undermine the litigation and the Hague Convention clearly prioritized expedition to ensure children were returned quickly to the correct jurisdiction. It held that the adjudication of a return petition was similar to a district court's exercise of equitable power in the context of a preliminary injunction or a temporary restraining order.

In both circumstances, discovery often must proceed quickly, the district court must apprise itself of the relevant facts, and a decision must be rendered on an expedited basis. There was nothing objectionable in the trial court's handling of the matter.

Costs:
The mother argued, inter alia, that her financial situation was so dire she should not be required to pay costs at all. This was rejected by the Court of Appeals. It noted that whilst there was appellate authority which provided that a fee award in a case under the Convention might be excessive and an abuse of discretion if it prevented the respondent-parent from caring for the child, the mother in the instant case had admitted that she had the potential to earn 300,000 US Dollars a year.

Author of the summary: Peter McEleavy

INCADAT comment

Habitual Residence

The interpretation of the central concept of habitual residence (Preamble, Art. 3, Art. 4) has proved increasingly problematic in recent years with divergent interpretations emerging in different jurisdictions. There is a lack of uniformity as to whether in determining habitual residence the emphasis should be exclusively on the child, with regard paid to the intentions of the child's care givers, or primarily on the intentions of the care givers. At least partly as a result, habitual residence may appear a very flexible connecting factor in some Contracting States yet much more rigid and reflective of long term residence in others.

Any assessment of the interpretation of habitual residence is further complicated by the fact that cases focusing on the concept may concern very different factual situations. For example habitual residence may arise for consideration following a permanent relocation, or a more tentative move, albeit one which is open-ended or potentially open-ended, or indeed the move may be for a clearly defined period of time.

General Trends:

United States Federal Appellate case law may be taken as an example of the full range of interpretations which exist with regard to habitual residence.

Child Centred Focus

The United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit has advocated strongly for a child centred approach in the determination of habitual residence:

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 935].

See also:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 221].

Combined Child's Connection / Parental Intention Focus

The United States Courts of Appeals for the 3rd and 8th Circuits, have espoused a child centred approach but with reference equally paid to the parents' present shared intentions.

The key judgment is that of Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 83].

See also:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 879].

In the latter case a distinction was drawn between the situation of very young children, where particular weight was placed on parental intention(see for example: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 808]) and that of older children where the impact of parental intention was more limited.

Parental Intention Focus

The judgment of the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 301] has been highly influential in providing that there should ordinarily be a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence before a child can acquire a new one.

This interpretation has been endorsed and built upon in other Federal appellate decisions so that where there was not a shared intention on the part of the parents as to the purpose of the move this led to an existing habitual residence being retained, even though the child had been away from that jurisdiction for an extended period of time. See for example:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 777]: United States habitual residence retained after 8 months of an intended 4 year stay in Germany;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 780]: United States habitual residence retained during 32 month stay in Mexico;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 482]: United States habitual residence retained during 27 month stay in Greece.

The Mozes approach has also been approved of by the Federal Court of Appeals for the 2nd and 7th Circuits:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 878].

It should be noted that within the Mozes approach the 9th Circuit did acknowledge that given enough time and positive experience, a child's life could become so firmly embedded in the new country as to make it habitually resident there notwithstanding lingering parental intentions to the contrary.

Other Jurisdictions

There are variations of approach in other jurisdictions:

Austria
The Supreme Court of Austria has ruled that a period of residence of more than six months in a State will ordinarily be characterized as habitual residence, and even if it takes place against the will of the custodian of the child (since it concerns a factual determination of the centre of life).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
In the Province of Quebec, a child centred focus is adopted:

In Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 651], the Cour d'appel de Montréal held that the determination of the habitual residence of a child was a purely factual issue to be decided in the light of the circumstances of the case with regard to the reality of the child's life, rather than that of his parents. The actual period of residence must have endured for a continuous and not insignificant period of time; the child must have a real and active link to the place, but there is no minimum period of residence which is specified.

Germany
A child centred, factual approach is also evident in German case law:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 944].

This has led to the Federal Constitutional Court accepting that a habitual residence may be acquired notwithstanding the child having been wrongfully removed to the new State of residence:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 233].

The Constitutional Court upheld the finding of the Higher Regional Court that the children had acquired a habitual residence in France, notwithstanding the nature of their removal there. This was because habitual residence was a factual concept and during their nine months there, the children had become integrated into the local environment.

Israel
Alternative approaches have been adopted when determining the habitual residence of children. On occasion, strong emphasis has been placed on parental intentions. See:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 939].

However, reference has been made to a more child centred approach in other cases. See:

decision of the Supreme Court in C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 922].

New Zealand
In contrast to the Mozes approach the requirement of a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence was specifically rejected by a majority of the New Zealand Court of Appeal. See

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 816].

Switzerland
A child centred, factual approach is evident in Swiss case law:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841].

United Kingdom
The standard approach is to consider the settled intention of the child's carers in conjunction with the factual reality of the child's life.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 2]. For academic commentary on the different models of interpretation given to habitual residence. See:

R. Schuz, "Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice", Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13, No. 1, 2001, p. 1;

R. Schuz, "Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context", Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Costs

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Faits

La procédure concernait un enfant né aux États-Unis d'Amérique en février 2008 d'une mère américaine et d'un père suédois. Les parents étaient mariés. En juillet 2008, la famille emménagea en Suède. L'objectif de ce déménagement était contesté par les parents. Leur relation en Suède était difficile et la mère quitta le domicile familial à plusieurs reprises.

Le 17 mars 2010, la mère emmena l'enfant aux États-Unis d'Amérique pour deux semaines de vacances. Le 7 avril, jour du retour prévu, elle informa le père qu'elle et l'enfant resteraient aux États-Unis. Après un mois de recherche, le père localisa la mère. Il introduisit une demande de retour le 26 mai 2010.

Le 23 juillet 2010, le U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois (tribunal américain du district sud de l'Illinois) ordonna le retour de l'enfant en Suède. Le 17 novembre 2010, le Tribunal ordonna le paiement des dépens par la mère, à hauteur de 150 570 dollars. La mère interjeta appel de ces deux décisions.

Dispositif

Recours rejeté et retour ordonné ; l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle en Suède à l'époque du non-retour et les conditions requises par l'article 13(1)(b) de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants pour reconnaître qu'il existe un risque grave que l'enfant soit exposé à un danger n'étaient pas réunies.

Motifs

Résidence habituelle - art. 3


La Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (Cour d'appel du septième ressort) a indiqué avoir suivi l'analyse de la résidence habituelle développée par la Cour d'appel du neuvième ressort dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001). Il s'agissait de déterminer si un lieu de résidence antérieur (les États-Unis d'Amérique dans le cas considéré) était effectivement abandonné et une nouvelle résidence établie (en Suède en l'espèce) « par les agissements et l'intention conjointes des parents, comme par le passage du temps ».

Au vu des preuves, la Cour a rejeté les arguments de la mère, selon lesquels elle n'avait jamais eu avec le père l'intention d'abandonner les États-Unis d'Amérique comme résidence habituelle pour elle et son enfant (80 % des biens avaient été envoyés en Suède, un statut de résident permanent avait été octroyé, des leçons de suédois avaient été prises, aucune résidence n'avait été conservée aux États-Unis). Avoir l'intention ou l'espoir de retourner dans un pays n'empêche pas d'établir une nouvelle résidence.

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)


La mère a fait valoir que le père exposait l'enfant à un risque grave de danger. Elle a indiqué en l'espèce que le couple s'était violemment battu à plusieurs reprises. Au cours d'un de ces épisodes, le père avait jeté l'enfant au sol. Il était de plus pharmacodépendant et faisait un usage immodéré de l'alcool. Le père a contesté ces allégations, qui ont été rejetées par le juge de première instance.

La Cour a estimé que les scènes de violence passées représentaient des « querelles domestiques mineures », plutôt que des violences susceptibles de porter préjudice à l'enfant. De plus, étant donné que l'application de la Convention visait à déterminer la juridiction compétente pour statuer sur le différend, non régler le litige lui-même, le risque devait être réellement grave. « Des preuves claires et convaincantes » devaient être apportées car « toute condition moins contraignante créerait une situation où l'exception absorberait la règle ».

La Cour a accepté l'analyse du juge de première instance selon laquelle le père n'avait jamais jeté l'enfant au sol et les problèmes d'alcool et de dépendance, quels qu'ils fussent, n'entachaient pas la décision.

Questions procédurales


Divulgation des preuves (discovery) :
La mère a argué que le juge de première instance avait limité à tort la phase d'investigation de la cause préalable au procès (pre-trial discovery), réduisant ainsi sa faculté à démontrer que le père exposait l'enfant à un risque grave de danger. La Cour d'appel a examiné les actions de l'équipe juridique de la mère et du juge de première instance.

Elle a relevé inter alia, que des éléments additionnels de preuve avaient été demandés pour la première fois la veille de l'audience prévue et que le juge avait requis du père une dispense afin de produire les documents, notamment médicaux, souhaités par la mère (le père avait alors fourni des documents à caractère médical et professionnel, mais aucun élément relatif aux médicaments délivrés sur ordonnance dans le passé).

La Cour d'appel a considéré qu'il convenait de déterminer si le juge de première instance n'aurait pas dû refuser la divulgation additionnelle des preuves. Elle a indiqué que la décision ne serait infirmée que si un préjudice réel et substantiel en découlait.

La Cour a considéré le refus d'une divulgation additionnelle de preuves comme justifiée car le temps était compté dans cette affaire. Elle a indiqué que les juges avaient toute latitude pour limiter la discovery lorsqu'une divulgation additionnelle viendrait compromettre le règlement du différend et que la Convention de La Haye privilégiait une procédure accélérée afin d'assurer un retour rapide des enfants à la bonne juridiction.

Elle a estimé que l'ordonnance de retour était similaire à la décision du juge de premier degré dans le cadre d'une injonction préjudicielle ou d'un ordre temporaire de restriction des droits. Dans les deux cas, les éléments de preuve doivent être produits rapidement, le juge doit s'approprier les faits et une décision doit être rendue après une procédure accélérée. Rien ne pouvait être objecté à la manière dont le juge avait traité cette affaire.

Dépens :
La mère a fait valoir inter alia, qu'étant dans une situation financière extrêmement difficile, les dépens ne pouvaient aucunement lui être imputés. Cet argument a été rejeté par la Cour d'appel. Alors qu'un juge en appel, dans une affaire en vertu de la Convention, pouvait considérer des frais comme excessifs et résultant d'une erreur d'appréciation s'ils empêchaient le parent défendeur de s'occuper de l'enfant, en l'espèce, la mère avait admis que ses revenus potentiels annuels s'élevaient à 300 000 dollars.

Auteur du résumé : Peter McEleavy

Commentaire INCADAT

Résidence habituelle

L'interprétation de la notion centrale de résidence habituelle (préambule, art. 3 et 4) s'est révélée particulièrement problématique ces dernières années, des divergences apparaissant dans divers États contractants. Une approche uniforme fait défaut quant à la question de savoir ce qui doit être au cœur de l'analyse : l'enfant seul, l'enfant ainsi que l'intention des personnes disposant de sa garde, ou simplement l'intention de ces personnes. En conséquence notamment de cette différence d'approche, la notion de résidence peut apparaître comme un élément de rattachement très flexible dans certains États contractants ou un facteur de rattachement plus rigide et représentatif d'une résidence à long terme dans d'autres.

L'analyse du concept de résidence habituelle est par ailleurs compliquée par le fait que les décisions concernent des situations factuelles très diverses. La question de la résidence habituelle peut se poser à l'occasion d'un déménagement permanent à l'étranger, d'un déménagement consistant en un test d'une durée illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée ou simplement d'un séjour à l'étranger de durée déterminée.

Tendances générales:

La jurisprudence des cours d'appel fédérales américaines illustre la grande variété d'interprétations données au concept de résidence habituelle.
Approche centrée sur l'enfant

La cour d'appel fédérale des États-Unis d'Amérique du 6e ressort s'est prononcée fermement en faveur d'une approche centrée sur l'enfant seul :

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 935]

Voir aussi :

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 221].

Approche combinée des liens de l'enfant et de l'intention parentale

Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis d'Amérique des 3e et 8e ressorts ont privilégié une méthode où les liens de l'enfant avec le pays ont été lus à la lumière de l'intention parentale conjointe.
Le jugement de référence est le suivant : Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 83].

Voir aussi :

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 530] ;

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Dans cette dernière espèce, une distinction a été pratiquée entre la situation d'enfants très jeunes (où une importance plus grande est attachée à l'intention des parents - voir par exemple : Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 808]) et celle d'enfants plus âgés pour lesquels l'intention parentale joue un rôle plus limité.

Approche centrée sur l'intention parentale

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel fédérale du 9e ressort a rendu une décision dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301], qui s'est révélée très influente en exigeant la présence d'une intention ferme d'abandonner une résidence préexistante pour qu'un enfant puisse acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle.

Cette interprétation a été reprise et précisée par d'autres décisions rendues en appel par des juridictions fédérales de sorte qu'en l'absence d'intention commune des parents en cas de départ pour l'étranger, la résidence habituelle a été maintenue dans le pays d'origine, alors même que l'enfant a passé une période longue à l'étranger.  Voir par exemple :

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 777] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour prévu de 4 ans en Allemagne ;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 780] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 32 mois au Mexique ;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT : HC/E/USf 482] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 27 mois en Grèce.

La décision rendue dans l'affaire Mozes a également été approuvée par les cours fédérales d'appel du 2e et du 7e ressort :

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 776] ;

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 878] ;

Il convient de noter que dans l'affaire Mozes, la Cour a reconnu que si suffisamment de temps s'est écoulé et que l'enfant a vécu une expérience positive, la vie de l'enfant peut être si fermement attachée à son nouveau milieu qu'une nouvelle résidence habituelle doit pouvoir y être acquise nonobstant l'intention parentale contraire.

Autres États contractants

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position a évolué :

Autriche
La Cour suprême d'Autriche a décidé qu'une résidence de plus de six mois dans un État sera généralement caractérisée de résidence habituelle, quand bien même elle aurait lieu contre la volonté du gardien de l'enfant (puisqu'il s'agit d'une détermination factuelle du centre de vie).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
Au Québec, au contraire, l'approche est centrée sur l'enfant :
Dans Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 651], la Cour d'appel de Montréal a décidé que la résidence habituelle d'un enfant est simplement une question de fait qui doit s'apprécier à la lumière de toutes les circonstances particulières de l'espèce en fonction de la réalité vécue par l'enfant en question, et non celle de ses parents. Le séjour doit être d'une durée non négligeable (nécessaire au développement de liens par l'enfant et à son intégration dans son nouveau milieu) et continue, aussi l'enfant doit-il avoir un lien réel et actif avec sa résidence; cependant, aucune durée minimale ne peut être formulée.

Allemagne
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort également de la jurisprudence allemande :

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale a ainsi admis qu'une résidence habituelle puisse être acquise bien que l'enfant ait été illicitement déplacé dans le nouvel État de résidence :

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

La Cour constitutionnelle a confirmé l'analyse de la Cour régionale d'appel selon laquelle les enfants avaient acquis leur résidence habituelle en France malgré la nature de leur déplacement là-bas. La Cour a en effet considéré  que la résidence habituelle était un concept factuel, et les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur milieu local pendant les neuf mois qu'ils y avaient vécu.

Israël
Des approches alternatives ont été adoptées lors de la détermination de la résidence habituelle. Il est arrivé qu'un poids important ait été accordé à l'intention parentale. Voir :

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865] ;

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

Cependant, il a parfois été fait référence à une approche plus centrée sur l'enfant. Voir :

décision de la Cour suprême dans C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241 ;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 922].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Contrairement à l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Mozes, la cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Zélande a expressément rejeté l'idée que pour acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, il convient d'avoir l'intention ferme de renoncer à la résidence habituelle précédente. Voir :

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suisse
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort de la jurisprudence suisse :

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Royaume-Uni
L'approche standard est de considérer conjointement la ferme intention des personnes ayant la charge de l'enfant et la réalité vécue par l'enfant.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Pour un commentaire doctrinal des différentes approches du concept de résidence habituelle dans les pays de common law. Voir :

R. Schuz, « Habitual Residence of  Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice », Child and Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 13, No1, 2001, p.1 ;

R. Schuz, « Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context » Journal of Transnational Law and Policy, Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Frais

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.