CASE

Download full text DE

Case Name

6Ob230/11h, Oberster Gerichtshof

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AT 1160

Court

Country

AUSTRIA

Name

Oberster Gerichtshof

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Pimmer (président), Schramm, Gitschthaler, Kodek, Nowotny

States involved

Requesting State

ITALY

Requested State

AUSTRIA

Decision

Date

24 November 2011

Status

Final

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(b) 13(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(b) 13(2)

Other provisions
Außerstreitgesetz - AußStrG (Austrian Act concerning non-contentious proceedings)
Authorities | Cases referred to
RIS-Justiz RS0043347; RIS-Justiz RS0043371; RIS-Justiz RS0043240; RIS-Justiz RS0042916; 3 Ob 131/04t RIS-Justiz RS0007104; RIS-Justiz RS0044088; RIS-Justiz RS0074552 [T3]; 2 Ob 537/92; 5 Ob 47/09m; RIS-Justiz RS0074561 [T3]; RIS-Justiz RS0074568 [T8]; 2 Ob 103/09z; 6 Ob 242/09w; RIS-Justiz RS0112662; RIS-Justiz RS0074568 [T1, T2]; 1 Ob 51/02k; RIS-Justiz RS0109515 [T13, T14, T15]; Cour européenne des droits de l'homme, Affaire Glesmann c. Allemagne, No 25706/03.

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The case concerned two children aged 14 and 9, whose mother had sole custody and who had lived with her in Sicily since 2009. The children went to visit their father in Austria for the Easter holiday. They did not return to Sicily as planned because the elder wished to remain in Austria.

The mother tried to take them back in Austria. After that attempt, the authorities transferred custody of the children to the child-protection agency, with the father having physical custody. Legal action was brought for a transfer of custody to the father.

The mother applied for the children's return. In the first instance, the court decided not to order the elder's return on the grounds of his objections, but ordered the younger's return. That ruling was upheld on appeal. The father and mother entered two challenges before the Supreme Court.

Ruling

Appeal inadmissible; the appeals did not raise any substantial legal issues.

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)

The father asserted that the younger child ought not to have been returned to Sicily because the mother beat him. The court stressed that this plea disregarded the fact that a return within the meaning of the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention was not a return to the parent from whom the child had been taken, since that decision was a matter for the court trying the issue of custody.

The point was only to restore the statu quo ante: the danger to which Article 13 of the Hague Convention referred could accordingly only be understood as referring to a danger connected with return to the State of habitual residence rather than a danger connected with delivery of the child to the parent from whom the child had been taken.

It added that the party entering that plea bore the burden of proof, as the court did not have to ascertain sua sponte whether any exceptions applied. And the father failed to mention any concrete danger connected with the return of the younger child to Italy.

Pointing out that the exceptions are to be interpreted narrowly, the court stated that the lower-court judges had considered that returning only one child owing to the other child's objections was not a grave risk. That position regarding the separation of siblings was not an error of judgment such as to justify the Supreme Court's intervention. It also stated that a return did not necessarily imply a separation of the child from the parent having removed the child or from his brother.

Return simply enabled the applicant parent to be restored to a position in which he or she could take part in caring for the child in the child's interest. It pointed out that the precedents were largely based on the principle that the parent having removed the child could be required, according to circumstance, to return with the child to the State of habitual residence in order to avoid a separation.

That position was connected with the fact that the parent having removed the child could be required to bear the negative effects of return since the issue was not the parent's well-being. And it did not appear from the evidence that such a return of the father was impossible, a plea which in fact the father did not raise.

Lastly, the court stated that there was no need to refer the case to the European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR): the ECrtHR considered that the authorities had wide discretion with respect to the regulation of custody rights. In addition, the issue raised in this case was not an issue on the merits relating to custody but merely an issue of return.

The Court drew the conclusion that the appeal did not raise issues sufficiently substantial to be admissible.

Author of the summary: Aude Fiorini

INCADAT comment

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Faits

L'affaire concernait deux enfants de 14 et 9 ans dont la mère avait la garde exclusive et qui vivaient avec elle en Sicile depuis 2009. Les enfants vinrent passer les fêtes de Pâques avec leur père en Autriche. Ils ne rentrèrent pas en Sicile comme prévu car l'aîné souhaitait rester en Autriche.

La mère tenta de les récupérer en Autriche. A la suite de cette tentative, les autorités locales transférèrent la garde des enfants au service de protection de l'enfance, le père disposant de la garde physique. Une action en justice fut introduite en vue de transférer la garde au père.

La mère demanda le retour des enfants. En première instance, le tribunal décida de ne pas ordonner le retour de l'aîné des enfants en raison de son opposition, mais ordonna le retour du cadet. Cette décision fut confirmée en appel. Le père et la mère saisirent la Cour suprême de deux recours.

Dispositif

Recours irrecevable; les recours ne soulevaient pas de questions de droit sérieuses.

Motifs

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)


Le père faisait valoir que le cadet des enfants n'aurait pas dû être renvoyé en Sicile car la mère le battait. La Cour souligna que cet argument méconnaissait le fait que le retour au sens de la Convention de la Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants n'était pas un retour au parent auquel l'enfant a été retiré puisque cette décision appartenait au tribunal saisi de la question de la garde.

Il s'agissait seulement de rétablir le statu quo ante : le danger visé à l'article 13 de la Convention de la Haye ne pouvait s'entendre dès lors que d'un danger lié au retour dans l'état de la résidence habituelle et non un danger lié à la remise de l'enfant au parent auquel l'enfant a été retiré.

Elle ajouta que la charge de la preuve appartenait à la partie qui s'en prévalait, le juge n'ayant pas à rechercher d'office si des exceptions s'appliquaient. Or le père ne mentionnait pas de danger concret lié au retour du cadet des enfants en Italie.

Rappelant que les exceptions sont d'interprétation stricte, la Cour indiqua que les juges du fond avaient considéré que le retour d'un seul des enfants du fait de l'opposition de l'autre enfant ne représentait pas un risque grave.  Cette position concernant la séparation d'une fratrie n'était pas une erreur de jugement de nature à justifier l'intervention de la Cour suprême.

Elle précisa par ailleurs que le retour n'impliquait pas nécessairement la séparation de l'enfant du parent ayant emmené l'enfant ou de son frère. Le retour permettait simplement au parent demandeur de se trouver de nouveau dans une situation où il peut participer aux soins de l'enfant dans son intérêt. Elle rappela que la jurisprudence partait très largement du principe qu'il pouvait être exigé du parent ayant emmené l'enfant en fonction des circonstances de retourner avec l'enfant dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle afin d'éviter une séparation.

Cette position était liée au fait qu'il pouvait être exigé du parent ayant emmené l'enfant qu'il subisse les conséquences négatives du retour puisque ce n'était pas du bien être du parent qu'il s'agissait.  Or il ne ressortait pas des pièces qu'un tel retour du père fût impossible, un argument que le père n'a d'ailleurs pas fait valoir.

La Cour indiqua enfin qu'il n'était pas nécessaire de renvoyer la question à la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme: la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme considérait que les autorités avaient une large marge d'appréciation en matière de régulation du droit de garde. En outre, la question posée en l'espèce n'était pas une question de fond concernant la garde mais seulement une question  de retour.

La Cour en conclut que le recours ne soulevait pas de questions suffisamment sérieuses pour être recevable.

Auteur du résumé : Aude Fiorini

Commentaire INCADAT

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).