CASE

Download full text FR

Case Name

J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, No 500-04-046027-075

INCADAT reference

HC/E/CA 968

Court

Country

CANADA

Name

Cour supérieure de Montréal

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Claudine Roy (J.C.S.)

States involved

Requesting State

ECUADOR

Requested State

CANADA

Decision

Date

29 February 2008

Status

Subject to appeal

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b) | Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2)

Order

Return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

12 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

12 13(1)(b)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Thomson c. Thomson, [1994] 3 R.C.S. 551, 585; Re W., (1998) 2 FLR 146 (England H.C.); Re H (Minor Abduction), (1990) 2 FLR 439 (Fam. Div.); Croll c. Croll, 66 F. Supp. 2d 554 (U.S. Dist. Ct. 1999); C.T. c. L.D., 2004 CanLII 31387 (QC C.S.); M. (V.) c. S. (E.), 2001 IIJCan 24715 (QC C.S.); Blondin c. Dubois, 189 F.3d 240 (2d Cir. 1999); Re L.L. (Children), 22 May 2000, (N.Y. Fam Ct.); N. c. N. (Abduction : Article 13 Defence), [1995] 1 FLR 107 (England H.C.); Cannon c. Cannon, [2004] EWCA Civ 1330 (England and Wales, C.A. Civ. Div.).
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse
Settlement of the child
Settlement of the Child
Concealment
Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The request concerned a child, born to parents who were married in 2001, who demonstrated progressive developmental delay. The Canadian mother had been living since 1991 in Ecuador, the State of the habitual residence of the child. Her parents had also been living there.

In 2004, following the separation of the parents, the mother and son moved in with the maternal grandparents. The separation of the parents went well at the beginning, in particular the parents agreed on the custody arrangements. Then the situation deteriorated and the mother started to believe that the father had sexually abused the child.

In this context, the father was imprisoned for 7 weeks. However, following further investigations and 4 court decisions (criminal and civil), the authorities of the State of the habitual residence of the child finally rejected the idea that the father had sexually assaulted the child, who simply suffered from anal dermatitis.

The case was closed in November 2005. Upon being released from prison, the father found that the child, his mother and his grandparents had disappeared. Various legal proceedings were initiated, three of which resulted in a prohibition on the mother leaving the country with the child.

Despite all this, the mother and her family were still persuaded that the developmental delay of the child was a result of sexual assault by the father, which they felt posed a threat.

In November 2006, the mother, the child and the grandparents left the country by car and then went by plane to Canada via 4 intermediary destinations. The father immediately filed a complaint of abduction but it was only in May 2007 that an international search allowed him to locate the child in Quebec.

Due to an administrative misunderstanding in the Central Authority, it was not until 12 November 2007 that the proceedings for the request for the return of the child were served.

Ruling

Return ordered.

Grounds

Grave Risk - Art. 13(1)(b)


The mother claimed that there was a grave risk because the father was a sexual predator. The court recalled that all the foreign proceedings had rejected these allegations, and indicated that it was necessary to remember that the question posed was that of return and not of custody. It found that the fears of the mother and of her parents were largely unreasonable.

The court expressed concerns about the actions of the maternal family (recalling that they had removed the child notwithstanding the existence of 3 court orders prohibiting this) as well as the state of mind of the mother, who had kept the child afraid of the father. The corruption of the judicial authorities in the State of the habitual residence had not been proved.

In addition, the mother claimed that the return of the child would expose him to an intolerable situation:

- because of the loss of daily contact with his maternal grandparents. On this point, the court observed that the grandparents themselves were responsible for the fact that they were the subject of arrest warrants for abducting the child in the country of the habitual residence. In addition, there was no question of depriving the father of his child for the sole benefit of the grandparents.

- because of the difficulties that the mother would face upon returning. On this point, the court recalled that the mother had lived in the country for 15 years and had important links there; that the father had offered the mother financial support so that she could settle with the child; and that it was only temporary as the possibility that the mother would be allowed to settle in Quebec with the child had not been excluded.

- because of the loss of developmental progress achieved by the child. On this last point, the court held that with the necessary professional support, the child would be able to once again get used to life in the country where he lived until he had been illegally abducted.
 

Settlement of the Child - Art. 12(2)


The child had left his habitual residence on 9 November 2006, before arriving in Canada on 12 November 2006. The court, citing the English decision of Cannon [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 598], stated the need to move from the standpoint of the child in question to determine legislative intent.

The rule was that the child is returned to his country of residence if there has been a wrongful removal. However, the drafters had recognised that after a time period of one year, it was possible that the interests of the child concerned would be different because of his or her integration in a new country and so the drafters left it to the judicial authorities to allow or refuse a return.

The court stated that it was particularly difficult to discuss settlement in this case, given that the child, having behavioural difficulties, did not integrate easily. It observed that the child was nervous and stressed and that he did not attend school much between November 2004 and May 2007. It was clear that the situation had improved since then because the child had been looked after by health and education professionals.

The child now had a stable life, he had adapted (rather than settled). The court considered, however, that the authorities and social services in the country of the habitual residence would be able to deal with the situation, stating that if the return had a disruptive effect, that could have been avoided if there had been no unlawful removal.

INCADAT comment

Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse

Courts have responded in different ways when faced with allegations that the left-behind parent has acted inappropriately or sexually abused the wrongfully removed or retained children. In the most straightforward cases the accusations may simply be dismissed as unfounded. Where this is not possible courts have been divided as to whether a detailed investigation should be undertaken in the State of refuge, or, whether the relevant assessment should be conducted in the State of habitual residence, with interim measures being taken to attempt to protect the child on his return.

- Accusations Dismissed:

Belgium

Civ. Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/BE 706]

The father claimed that the mother sought the return of the child to have her declared mentally incapable and to sell her organs. The Court held, however, that even if the father's accusations were firmly held, they were not backed up by any evidence.
 
Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 666]
 
The Court held that if the mother had serious concerns with regard to her son, then she would not have left him in the care of the father on holiday after what she claimed there had been a serious incident.
 
J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, No 500-04-046027-075 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 968]

The mother claimed that a grave risk arose because the father was a sexual predator.
The Court noted that such allegations had been rejected in foreign proceedings. It equally drew attention to the fact that Convention proceedings concerned the return of the child and not the issue of custody. The fears of the mother and of the maternal grandparents were deemed to be largely irrational. There was also no proof that the judicial authorities in the State of habitual residence were corrupt. The Court instead expressed concerns about the actions of members of the maternal family (who had abducted the child notwithstanding the existence of three court orders to the contrary) as well as the mental state of the mother, who had kept the child in a state of fear of the father.

France
CA Amiens, 4 mars 1998, No de RG 5704759 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 704]

The Court rejected the allegation of physical violence against the father; if there had been violence, it was not of the level required to activate Article 13(1)(b).

New Zealand
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 303]

The Court rejected arguments by the mother that the father's alleged sexual practices would place the child at a grave risk of harm. The Court held that there was no evidence a return would expose the child to the level of harm contemplated under Article 13(1)(b).

Switzerland
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Appellate Court of the Canton Zurich), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 426]

The mother argued that the father was a danger to the children because, inter alia, he had sexually abused the daughter. In rejecting this accusation, the Court noted that the mother had previously been willing to leave the children in the father's sole care whilst she went abroad.

- Return ordered with investigation to be carried out in the State of habitual residence:

United Kingdom - England and Wales

N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 19]

The possible risk to the daughter needed to be investigated in the pending custody proceedings in Australia. In the interim, the child needed protection. However, this protection did not require the refusal of the application for her return. Such risk of physical harm as might exist was created by unsupervised contact to the father, not by return to Australia.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 361]

It was argued that the allegations of sexual abuse by the mother's cohabitee were of such a nature as to activate the Article 13(1)(b) exception. This was rejected by the Court. In doing this the Court noted that the Swedish authorities were aware of the case and had taken steps to ensure that the child would be protected upon her return: she would be placed in an analysis home with her mother. If the mother did not agree to this, the child would be placed in care. The Court also noted that the mother had now separated from her cohabitee.

Finland
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 360]

When considering whether the allegations of the father's sexual abuse of his daughter constituted a barrier to returning the children, the Court noted that one of the objectives of the Hague Child Abduction Convention was that the forum for the determination of custody issues was not to be changed at will and that the credibility of allegations as to the personal characteristics of the petitioner were most properly investigated in the spouses' common State of habitual residence. In addition, the Court noted that a grave risk of harm did not arise if the mother were to return with the children and saw to it that their living conditions were arranged in their best interests. Accordingly, the Court found that there was no barrier to the return of the children.

Ireland
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IE 389]

The Irish Supreme Court accepted that there was prima facie evidence of sexual abuse by the father and that the children should not be returned into his care. However, it found that the trial judge had erred in concluding that this amounted to a grave risk of harm in returning the children to England per se. In the light of the undertakings given by the father, there would be no grave risk in returning the children to live in the former matrimonial home in the sole care of their mother.

- Investigation to be undertaken in the State of refuge:

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/HK 595]

The Court of Appeal criticised the fact that the return order had been made conditional on the acts of a third party (the Swiss Central Authority) over whom China's (Hong Kong SAR) Court had neither jurisdiction nor control. The Court ruled that unless and until the allegations could be discounted altogether or after investigation could be found to have no substance, it was almost inconceivable that the trial court's discretion could reasonably and responsibly be exercised to return the child to the environment in which the alleged abuse took place.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. 2002) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 459]

The Court of Appeals for the First Circuit ruled that great care had to be exercised before returning a child where there existed credible evidence of the child having suffered sexual abuse. It further stated that a court should be particularly wary about using potentially unenforceable undertakings to try to protect a child in such situations.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 971]

The District Court had appointed an independent expert in paediatrics, child abuse, child sexual abuse and child pornography, to assess whether the photographs of the sons constituted child pornography and whether the behaviour problems suffered by the children were indications of sexual abuse. The expert reported that there was no evidence to suggest that the father was a paedophile, that he was sexually aroused by children, or that the pictures were pornographic. The expert approved of the German investigations and stated that they were accurate assessments and that their conclusions were consistent with their reported observations. The expert determined that the symptoms that the boys displayed were consistent with the stress in their lives caused by the acrimonious custody dispute and recommended that the boys not undergo further sexual abuse evaluation because it would increase their already-dangerous stress levels.

- Return Refused:

United Kingdom - Scotland

Q., Petitioner [2001] SLT 243 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 341]

The Court held that there was a possibility that the allegations of abuse were true. It was also possible that the child, if returned, could be allowed into the unsupervised company of the alleged abuser. The Court equally noted that a court in another Hague Convention country would be able to provide adequate protection. Consequently it was possible for a child to be returned where an allegation of sexual abuse had been made. However, on the facts, the Court ruled that in light of what had happened in France during the course of the various legal proceedings, the courts there might not be able or willing to provide adequate protection for the children. Consequently, the risk amounted to a grave risk that the return of the girl would expose her to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place her in an intolerable situation.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 597]

Having found that sexual abuse had occurred, the Court of Appeals ruled that this rendered immaterial the father's arguments that the courts of Sweden could take ameliorative actions to prevent further harm once the children had been returned. The Court of Appeals held that in such circumstances, Article 13(1)(b) did not require separate consideration either of undertakings or of the steps which might be taken by the courts of the country of habitual residence.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Settlement of the Child

A uniform interpretation has not emerged with regard to the concept of settlement; in particular whether it should be construed literally or rather in accordance with the policy objectives of the Convention.  In jurisdictions favouring the latter approach the burden of proof on the abducting parent is clearly greater and the exception is more difficult to establish.

Jurisdictions in which a heavy burden of proof has been attached to the establishment of settlement include:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 106]

In this case it was held that settlement is more than mere adjustment to surroundings. It involves a physical element of relating to, being established in, a community and an environment. It also has an emotional constituent denoting security and stability.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598]

For academic criticism of Re N. see:

Collins L. et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws, 14th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell, London, 2006, paragraph 19-121.

However, it may be noted that a more recent development in England has been the adoption of a child-centric assessment of settlement by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  This ruling may impact on the previous case law.

However there was no apparent weakening of the standard in the non-Convention case Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649,[INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 982].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107]

For Article 12(2) to be activated the interest of the child in not being uprooted must be so cogent that it outweighs the primary purpose of the Convention, namely the return of the child to the proper jurisdiction so that the child's future may be determined in the appropriate place.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 963]

A settled situation was one which could reasonably be relied upon to last as matters stood and did not contain indications that it was likely to change radically or to fall apart. There had therefore to be some projection into the future.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]

United States of America
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf  134]

A literal interpretation of the concept of settlement has been favoured in:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 291];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

The impact of the divergent interpretations is arguably most marked where very young children are concerned.

It has been held that settlement is to be considered from the perspective of a young child in:

Austria
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 378];

Australia
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 823];

State Central Authority v. C.R [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

Israel
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 938];

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/MC 510];

Switzerland
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (District Court of St. Gallen) (Switzerland), decision of 8 September 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 431].

A child-centric approach has also been adopted in several significant appellate decisions with regard to older children, with emphasis placed on the children's views.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

In contrast, a more objective assessment was favoured in the United States decision:

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S.2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 208]
The children, aged 3 and 1 1/2, had not established significant ties to their community in Brooklyn; they were not involved in school, extra-curricular, community, religious or social activities which children of an older age would be.

Concealment

Where children are concealed in the State of refuge courts are reluctant to make a finding of settlement, even if many years elapse before their discovery:

Canada (7 years elapsed)
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 754];

See however the decision of the Cour d'appel de Montréal in:

Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

United Kingdom - Scotland (2 ½ years elapsed)
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, 2008 S.C.L.R. 329 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962];

Switzerland (4 years elapsed)
Justice de Paix du cercle de Lausanne (Magistrates' Court), decision of 6 July 2000, J 765 CIEV 112E [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 434];

United States of America
(2 ½ years elapsed)
Lops v. Lops, 140 F. 3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 125];

(3 years elapsed)
In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E. 2d 662 (1994) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 138].

Non-return orders have been made where notwithstanding the concealment the children have still been able to lead open lives:

United Kingdom - England & Wales (4 years elapsed)
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 815];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region) (4 ¾ years elapsed)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

Unlike the Article 13 exceptions, Article 12(2) does not expressly afford courts a discretion to make a return order if settlement is established.  Where this issue has arisen for consideration the majority judicial view has nevertheless been to apply the provision as if a discretion does exist, but this has arisen in different ways.

Australia
The matter has not been conclusively decided but there would appear to be appellate support for inferring a discretion, reference has been made to English and Scottish case law, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 276].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
English case law initially favoured inferring that a Convention based discretion existed by virtue of Article 18, see:

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598].

However, this interpretation was expressly rejected in the House of Lords decision Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  A majority of the panel held that the construction of Article 12(2) left the matter open that there was an inherent discretion where settlement was established.  It was pointed out that Article 18 did not confer any new power to order the return of a child under the Convention, rather it contemplated powers conferred by domestic law.

Ireland
In accepting the existence of a discretion reference was made to early English authority and Article 18.

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 391].

New Zealand
A discretion derives from the domestic legislation implementing the Convention, see:

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 882].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Whilst the matter was not explored in any detail, settlement not being established, there was a suggestion that a discretion would exist, with reference being made to Article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107].

There have been a few decisions in which no discretion was found to attach to Article 12(2), these include:

Australia
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232], - subsequently questioned;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 596] - subsequently overruled;

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

Article 18 not being included in the act implementing the Convention in Quebec, it is understood that courts do not possess a discretionary power where settlement is established.

For academic commentary on the use of discretion where settlement is established, see:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 204 et seq.;

R. Schuz, ‘In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Article 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly.

Faits

La demande concernait un enfant né de parents mariés en 2001, lequel présenta progressivement des retards de développement. La mère canadienne vivait depuis 1991 en Équateur, pays de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant. Ses parents également y vivaient. En 2004, à la suite de la séparation des parents, la mère s'installa avec son fils chez les grands-parents maternels.

La séparation des parents se passa pour le mieux au début, les parents s'accordant notamment sur les modalités de garde. Puis la situation se gâta et la mère commença à se demander si le père n'abusait pas sexuellement de l'enfant. Dans ce cadre, le père fut emprisonné pendant 7 semaines.

Toutefois, à la suite d'enquêtes plus poussées et de 4 décisions (au pénal et au civil), les autorités de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant rejetèrent définitivement l'idée d'agression sexuelle du père sur l'enfant -lequel souffrait simplement d'une dermatite anale.

Le dossier fut fermé en novembre 2005. A sa sortie de prison, le père constata que l'enfant, sa mère et ses grands-parents avaient disparu. Diverses procédures judiciaires furent entamées qui, pour trois d'entre elles, menèrent à une interdiction faite à la mère de quitter le pays avec l'enfant.

La mère et sa famille restèrent malgré tout persuadées que les retards développementaux de l'enfant étaient dus à une agression sexuelle du père, dont ils se sentaient menacés.

En novembre 2006, la mère, l'enfant et les grands-parents quittèrent le pays en voiture puis allèrent en avion au Canada via 4 destinations. Le père déposa immédiatement plainte pour enlèvement mais ce fut seulement en mai 2007 que des recherches internationales permirent de localiser l'enfant au Québec.

En raison d'un imbroglio administratif de l'Autorité centrale, ce ne fut que le 12 novembre 2007 que la procédure demandant le retour de l'enfant fut signifiée.

Dispositif

Retour ordonné.

Motifs

Risque grave - art. 13(1)(b)


La mère faisait valoir un risque grave au motif que le père était un prédateur sexuel. La Cour rappela que toutes les procédures étrangères avaient rejeté ces allégations, et indiqua qu'il fallait garder en mémoire que la question posée était celle du retour et non de la garde.

Elle constata que les craintes de la mère et de ses parents étaient largement irraisonnées et exprima au contraire une crainte face à la réaction de la famille de la mère (rappelant qu'ils avaient enlevé l'enfant en dépit de 3 interdictions judiciaires de ce faire), ainsi qu'une critique des capacités mentales de la mère, qui avait maintenu l'enfant dans un climat de peur de son père. La preuve de la corruption des autorités judiciaires de l'État de résidence habituelle n'était pas davantage rapportée.

En outre, la mère faisait valoir qu'un retour de l'enfant l'exposerait à une situation intolérable:

- en raison de la perte de contact quotidien avec les grands-parents maternels. Sur ce pont la cour observa que les grands-parents étaient seuls responsables du fait qu'ils faisaient l'objet de mandats d'arrêt pour enlèvement dans le pays de la résidence habituelle. En outre, il n'était pas question de priver un père de son enfant au bénéfice des seuls grands-parents.

- en raison des difficultés auxquelles la mère devrait faire face en cas de retour. Sur ce point la cour rappela que la mère avait vécu dans le pays 15 ans et y avait tissé des liens importants; que le père offrait à la mère son épargne afin qu'elle puisse s'installer et enfant que la situation pouvait n'être que provisoire puisqu'il n'était pas exclu que la mère fût autorisée à s'installer au Québec avec l'enfant.

- en raison de la perte des acquis scolaires de l'enfant. Sur ce dernier point, la Cour estima qu'avec le support professionnel nécessaire l'enfant pourrait se réhabituer à la vie dans le pays où il avait vécu jusqu'au déplacement illicite.
    
    
Intégration de l'enfant - art. 12(2)
L'enfant avait quitté son lieu de résidence habituelle le 9 novembre 2006, avant d'arriver au Canada le 12 novembre 2006. La Cour, citant l'arrêt anglais Cannon [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 598], indiqua qu'il fallait se placer du point de vue de l'enfant en cause pour déceler l'intention du législateur. La règle voulait qu'un enfant soit retourné dans son pays de résidence s'il y avait eu déplacement illicite.

Toutefois, le législateur reconnaissait qu'après un délai d'un an, il était possible que l'intérêt de l'enfant concerné soit différent en raison de l'intégration dans un nouveau pays et le législateur confiait alors aux autorités judiciaires d'accorder ou de refuser le retour.

Elle constata qu'il était particulièrement difficile de discuter l'intégration en l'espèce, s'agissant d'un enfant ayant des troubles de comportement qui ne s'intégrait pas facilement. Elle observa que l'enfant était nerveux et stressé et qu'il avait été très peu scolarisé entre novembre 2004 et mai 2007. Certes la situation s'était améliorée depuis car l'enfant avait été pris en charge par des professionnels de la santé et de l'éducation.

L'enfant avait désormais une vie stable, il s'adaptait (à défaut de s'intégrer). La Cour considéra cependant que les autorités et services sociaux de sa résidence habituelle pourraient s'occuper de la situation, rappelant que si le retour avait un effet perturbateur, cela aurait pu être évité s'il n'y avait pas eu déplacement illicite.

Intégration de l'enfant - art. 12(2)

-

Commentaire INCADAT

Allégations de mauvais traitement et abus sexuel

Les tribunaux ont adopté des positions variables lorsqu'ils ont été confrontés à des allégations selon lesquelles le parent délaissé avait fait subir des mauvais traitements ou abus sexuels à l'enfant déplacé ou retenu illicitement. Dans les affaires les plus simples, les accusations ont pu être rejetées comme non fondées. Lorsqu'il n'était pas évident que l'allégation était manifestement non fondée, les tribunaux se sont montrés divisés quant à savoir si une enquête poussée devait être menée dans l'État de refuge ou bien dans l'État de la résidence habituelle, auquel cas des mesures de protection provisoires seraient prises en vue de protéger l'enfant en cas de retour.

- Accusations déclarées non fondées :

Belgique

Civ Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 706]

Le père prétendait que la mère ne voulait le retour de l'enfant que pour la faire déclarer folle et vendre ses organes. Toutefois, le juge releva que si les déclarations du père relevaient d'une profonde conviction, elles n'étaient pas étayées d'éléments de preuve.

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 666]

La Cour décida que si la mère avait eu des craintes sérieuses à propos de son fils, elle ne l'aurait pas laissé aux soins du père pendant les vacances, après ce qu'elle présentait comme un incident sérieux.

J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, N°500-04-046027-075 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 968]

La mère faisait valoir un risque grave au motif que le père était un prédateur sexuel. La Cour rappela que toutes les procédures étrangères avaient rejeté ces allégations, et indiqua qu'il fallait garder en mémoire que la question posée était celle du retour et non de la garde. Elle constata que les craintes de la mère et de ses parents étaient largement irraisonnées, et que la preuve de la corruption des autorités judiciaires de l'État de résidence habituelle n'était pas davantage rapportée. La Cour exprima au contraire une crainte face à la réaction de la famille de la mère (rappelant qu'ils avaient enlevé l'enfant en dépit de 3 interdictions judiciaires de ce faire), ainsi qu'une critique concernant les capacités mentales de la mère, qui avait maintenu l'enfant dans un climat de peur de son père.

France
CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° RG 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation de violence physique du père à l'égard de l'enfant. S'il pouvait y avoir eu des épisodes violents, ils n'étaient pas de nature à caractériser le risque nécessaire à l'application de l'article 13(1)(b).

Nouvelle Zélande
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 303]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation selon laquelle les habitudes sexuelles du père étaient de nature à causer un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant. Elle ajouta que la preuve n'avait pas été apportée que le retour exposerait l'enfant à un risque tel que l'article 13(1)(b) serait applicable.

Suisse
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Cour d'appel du canton de Zurich) (Suisse), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 426]

La mère prétendait que le père constituait un danger pour les enfants parce qu'il avait entre autres abusé sexuellement de l'enfant. Pour rejeter cet argument, la Cour fit observer que la mère avait jusqu'alors laissé l'enfant vivre seul avec son père pendant qu'elle voyageait à l'étranger.

Retour ordonné et enquête à mener dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 19]

Le risque encouru par l'enfant devait faire l'objet d'une enquête dans le cadre de la procédure de garde en cours en Australie.  Il convenait de protéger l'enfant jusqu'à la conclusion de cette enquête. Toutefois cette nécessité de protection ne devait pas mener au rejet de la demande de retour car le risque était lié non pas au retour en Australie mais à un droit de visite et d'hébergement non surveillé.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 361]

La Cour rejeta les allégations selon lesquelles l'enfant était victime d'abus sexuels de la part du concubin de la mère de nature à déclencher le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b). Pour rejeter l'application de l'article 13(1)(b), la Cour avait relevé que les autorités suédoises étaient conscientes de ce risque d'abus et avaient pris des mesures précises de nature à protéger l'enfant à son retour : elle serait placée dans un foyer d'analyse avec sa mère. Si la mère refusait, alors l'enfant serait ôtée à sa famille et placée dans un foyer. Elle fit également remarquer que la mère s'était séparée de son concubin.

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 360]

Lors de son analyse concernant la question de savoir si l'allégation selon laquelle le père aurait abusé sexuellement de sa fille constituait une barrière au retour de l'enfant, la Cour a fait observer, d'une part, qu'un des objectifs de la Convention de La Haye était d'empêcher que le for devant se prononcer sur le retour de l'enfant soit choisi arbitrairement. La Cour observa, d'autre part, que la crédibilité des allégations devrait être analysée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle des époux car il s'agissait de l'État le mieux placé, et qu'aucun risque grave de danger n'existait si la mère accompagnait les enfants et organisait des conditions de vie dans leur meilleur intérêt. Dans ces conditions le retour pouvait être ordonné.

Irlande
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 389]

La Cour suprême irlandaise a noté qu'à première vue la preuve avait été apportée que les enfants avaient été victimes d'abus sexuels de la part du père et ne devaient pas être placés sous sa garde. Cependant, le tribunal avait estimé à tort que le retour des enfants en lui-même constituerait un risque grave. Au vu des engagements pris par le père, il n'y aurait pas de risque grave à renvoyer les enfants dans leur foyer familial sous la seule garde de la mère.

- Enquête à mener dans l'État de refuge :

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 595]

La Cour d'appel critiqua le fait que le retour était soumis à une condition sur laquelle les juridictions de la Chine (RAS Hong Kong) n'avaient aucun contrôle (ni aucune compétence). La condition posée étant l'action d'un tiers (l'Autorité centrale suisse). La Cour estima que jusqu'à ce que les allégations se révèlent dénuées de fondement, il n'était pas admissible que la cour, dans l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire, décide de renvoyer l'enfant dans le milieu dans lequel les abus s'étaient produits.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir.2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 459]

La Cour d'appel du premier ressort estima que le premier juge aurait dû faire preuve d'une grande prudence avant de renvoyer un enfant alors même qu'il y avait de sérieuses raisons de croire qu'il avait fait l'objet d'abus sexuels. La Cour d'appel ajouta que les juges devaient se montrer particulièrement prudents dans leur tentative de garantir la protection de l'enfant par la voie d'engagements dans des situations analogues.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 971]

Le Tribunal fédéral avait demandé à un pédiatre spécialisé dans les questions de maltraitance, d'abus sexuels sur enfants et de pédopornographie de se prononcer sur la question de savoir si les photos des enfants constituaient des photos pornographiques et si les troubles comportementaux des enfants traduisaient un abus sexuel. L'expert conclut qu'aucun élément ne permettait de déduire que le père était pédophile, qu'il était attiré sexuellement par des enfants ni que les photos étaient pornographiques. Elle approuva l'enquête allemande et constata que les conclusions allemandes étaient conformes aux observations effectuées. Elle ajouta que les symptômes développés par les enfants étaient causés par le stress que la séparation très difficile des parents leur causait. Elle ajouta encore que les enfants ne devaient pas être soumis à d'autres évaluations en vue d'établir un abus sexuel car cela ne ferait qu'ajouter à leur niveau de stress déjà dangereusement élevé.

- Retour refusé :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Q., Petitioner, [2001] SLT 243, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 341]

Le juge estima qu'il était possible que les allégations d'abus fussent exactes. De même, il n'était pas impossible qu'en cas de retour, l'enfant puisse être amené à avoir un contact non surveillé avec l'auteur potentiel de ces abus. Elle observa toutefois que les autorités d'autres États parties à la Convention de La Haye sont susceptibles de fournir une protection adéquate à l'enfant. En conséquence, le retour d'un enfant pouvait être ordonné même en cas d'allégations d'abus sexuels. En l'espèce cependant, le juge estima qu'au regard des différentes procédures ouvertes en France, il semblait que les juridictions compétentes n'étaient pas en mesure de protéger l'enfant, ou pas disposées à le faire. Elle en a déduit que le retour de l'enfant l'exposerait à un risque grave de danger physique ou psychologique ou la placerait de toute autre manière dans une situation intolérable.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 597]

Ces conclusions rendaient inopérants les arguments du père selon lequel les autorités suédoises pourraient prendre des mesures pour limiter tout danger supplémentaire une fois les enfants rentrées dans ce pays. La Cour d'appel décida qu'en ces circonstances, l'application de l'article 13(1)(b) n'exigeait pas que la question des engagements du père soit posée, pas davantage que celle des mesures à prendre par les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle.

(Auteur : Peter McEleavy, Avril 2013)

Intégration de l'enfant

La notion d'intégration ne fait pas encore l'objet d'une interprétation uniforme. La question se pose notamment de savoir si l'intégration doit s'entendre littéralement ou être interprétée à la lumière des objectifs de la Convention. Dans les États faisant prévaloir la deuxième alternative, la charge de la preuve est plus lourde pour le parent ravisseur et l'exception d'application plus rare.

Parmi les États les plus exigeants en ce qui concerne la preuve de l'intégration de l'enfant, on peut citer :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 106] ;
Dans cette espèce, il fut décidé que la notion d'intégration dépassait celle d'adaptation au nouveau milieu. L'intégration implique un élément de relation physique avec une communauté et un environnement. Elle contient un élément émotionnel traduisant la sécurité et la stabilité.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Pour un commentaire critique de Re N., voir :

L.Collins et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws: fourteenth edition, London, Sweet & Maxwell, 2006, para. 19 à 121.

Il convient toutefois de noter que plus récemment l'Angleterre a vu se développer une analyse de la notion d'intégration centrée sur l'enfant. On se réfèrera à la décision de la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. Cette décision pourrait remettre en cause la jurisprudence antérieure.

Toutefois cette décision n'a apparemment pas affaibli les exigences posées en la matière par la Common Law comme en témoigne Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 982].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Pour que l'article 12(2) trouve à s'appliquer, il faut que l'intérêt qu'a l'enfant à rester dans son nouveau milieu soit si fort qu'il dépasse l'objectif premier de la Convention selon lequel il appartient au juge du lieu de la résidence habituelle qu'avait l'enfant au moment de l'enlèvement de décider de l'avenir de celui-ci.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 963]

L'intégration existe dans les situations stables, dont on peut s'attendre qu'elles durent. Il convient d'opérer une certaine projection dans l'avenir.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962]

États-Unis d'Amérique
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf  134]

Une interprétation littérale du concept d'intégration a été préférée dans les États suivants :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 291];

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825]

L'impact de la différence d'interprétation est sans doute plus marqué lorsque ce sont des jeunes enfants qui sont en cause.

Il a été décidé que l'intégration doit s'apprécier du point de vue du jeune enfant en :

Autriche
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 378] ;

Australie
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 823] ;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824] ;

Israël
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 938] ;

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/MC 510] ;

Suisse
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (Cour cantonale de St. Gallen) (Suisse), décision du 8 Septembre 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 431].

Une approche centrée sur l'enfant a également été adoptée dans des décisions importantes rendues à propos d'enfants plus grands, l'accent étant mis sur l'opinion de l'enfant.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

En revanche, c'est une analyse plus objective de l'intégration qui a été préférée aux États-Unis d'Amérique :

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S. 2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 208];
Les enfants, âgés de 3 ans et 1 an ½ n'avaient pas établi de liens importants dans leur nouveau milieu de Brooklyn. Ils ne participaient pas aux activités scolaires, extrascolaires, religieuses, sociales ou communautaires auxquelles des enfants plus âgés se livrent.

Dissimulation de l'enfant

Lorsque des enfants sont cachés dans l'État de refuge, les juges sont réticents à l'idée de considérer qu'il y a eu intégration, même lorsque de nombreuses années se sont écoulées entre le déplacement et la localisation :

Canada (7 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/CA 754] ;

Voir cependant la décision de la Cour d'appel de Montréal dans :

Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse (2 ans et demi entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962];

Suisse (4 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Justice de Paix du cercle de Lausanne, 6 juillet 2000, J 765 CIEV 112E, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 434];

États-Unis d'Amérique
(2 ans et demi  entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Lops v. Lops, 140 F. 3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 125] ;

(3 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E. 2d 662 (1994), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 138]. 

Dans certains États, le retour d'enfants a été ordonné alors même qu'ils menaient une vie relativement ouverte en dépit du fait qu'ils étaient recherchés :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles (4 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 815] ;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong) (4 ans 3/4 entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825].

Pouvoir d'ordonner le retour nonobstant l'intégration

Au contraire de l'exception de l'article 13, l'article 12(2) ne prévoit pas expressément la possibilité pour les juridictions saisies de la demande de retour de disposer d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour ordonner le retour en cas d'intégration. Lorsque la question s'est posée, il apparaît néanmoins que les cours ont majoritairement  admis le caractère discrétionnaire de l'application de cette disposition.  La question s'est toutefois posée en des termes très variables :

Australie
La question n'a pas été définitivement résolue mais il semble que la Cour d'appel a sous-entendu le caractère discrétionnaire de l'article 12(2), référence faite à la jurisprudence anglaise et écossaise. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 276].

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
La jurisprudence anglaise déduisait l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire de l'article 18, voir :

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Toutefois cette interprétation a été expressément rejetée par la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. La majorité des juges estima que l'article 12(2) laissait ouverte la question de savoir si le retour pouvait discrétionnairement être ordonné nonobstant l'intégration. Les juges soulignèrent que l'article 18 ne donne pas un nouveau pouvoir d'ordonner le retour d'un enfant mais se réfère simplement à un pouvoir préexistant en droit interne.

Irlande
Il a été fait référence à la jurisprudence ancienne anglaise et à l'article 18 pour justifier l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire :

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 391];

Nouvelle-Zélande
En Nouvelle-Zélande, le pouvoir discrétionnaire est prévu par la législation de mise en œuvre de la Convention. Voir :

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J.) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 882]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Quoique la question n'ait pas été envisagée en détail puisqu'en l'espèce il n'y avait pas eu intégration, il fut suggéré que l'application de l'exception avait un caractère discrétionnaire, référence étant faite à l'article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Parmi les décisions qui n'ont pas usé de pouvoir discrétionnaire dans le cadre de l'application de l'article 12(2), voir :

Australie
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232], - ultérieurement discuté;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, (Fam), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/UKe 596] - ultérieurement remis en cause;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

L'article 18 n'ayant pas été reproduit dans la loi mettant en œuvre la Convention au Québec, il a été considéré que le juge ne dispose pas d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire en cas d'intégration.

Sur l'usage d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire lorsque l'enfant enlevé s'est intégré dans son nouveau milieu, voir :

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 204 et seq.

R. Schuz, « In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Art 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention » Child and Family Law Quarterly, 2008.