CASE

Download full text DE

Case Name

6Ob73/12x, Oberster Gerichtshof

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AT 1163

Court

Country

AUSTRIA

Name

Oberster Gerichtshof

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Pimmer (président), Schramm, Gitschthaler, Kodek, Nowotny

States involved

Requesting State

PORTUGAL

Requested State

AUSTRIA

Decision

Date

19 April 2012

Status

Final

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3 | Rights of Access - Art. 21

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

1 3 5 8 21

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3

Other provisions
(Austrian Act concerning non-contentious proceedings)
Authorities | Cases referred to
RIS-Justiz RS0043347; RIS-Justiz RS0043371; RIS-Justiz RS0043240;RIS-Justiz RS0042916; 3 Ob 131/04t; RIS-Justiz RS0007104; RIS-Justiz RS0044088; RIS-Justiz RS0074552 [T3]; 2 Ob 537/92 ; 5 Ob 47/09m; RIS-Justiz RS0074561 [T3]; RIS-Justiz RS0074568 [T8] = 2 Ob 103/09z; 6 Ob 242/09w; RIS-Justiz RS0112662; RIS-Justiz RS0074568 [T1, T2]; 1 Ob 51/02k; RIS-Justiz RS0109515 [T13, T14, T15]; Cour européenne des droits de l'homme, Affaire Glesmann c. Allemagne, Requête No 25706/03.

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The case concerned one child. The family lived in Portugal. After the parents separated in 2007, the mother obtained sole custody of the child and the father rights of access, that he exercised as frequently as possible.

In August 2011 the mother moved to Austria with the child, as she was unable to find employment in Portugal. At first instance and on appeal, the father's return application was dismissed.The father appealed to the Oberster Gerichthof (Supreme Court).

Ruling

Appeal inadmissible as it did not raise a sufficiently significant issue of law.

Grounds

Rights of Custody - Art. 3


The Oberster Gerichthof (Supreme Court) pointed out that the requirements for wrongfulness under Article 3 of the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention were cumulative and stressed that if the father's right did not include a right to determine jointly the location of the child's residence, then the removal was not wrongful.

Article 3 required breach of an exclusive or shared right of custody. In the event of the parents' separation, only the parent with whom the child lives meets that requirement: exercise of mere rights of access is not sufficient.

In the case in point, the Court noted that it was not disputed that at the time of the removal, the father did not have a right to determine jointly the location of the child's residence. Even in strictly practical terms, the father exercised mere rights of access.

Rights of Access - Art. 21


While the appeal referred to Article 21 of the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention, that was not sufficient justification for the child's return since Article 8 of the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention required a breach of custody rights and not of mere rights of access.

Author of the summary: Aude Fiorini

INCADAT comment

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Faits

L'affaire concernait un enfant. La famille vivait au Portugal. Après la séparation des parents en 2007, la mère obtint la garde exclusive de l'enfant et le père un droit de visite, qu'il exerçait autant que possible.

En août 2011, la mère vint s'installer en Autriche avec l'enfant car elle ne trouvait pas de travail au Portugal. En première instance comme en appel, la demande de retour du père fut rejetée. Le père forma un pourvoi devant la Oberster Gerichtshof (Cour suprême).

Dispositif

Recours irrecevable dans la mesure où il ne soulevait pas de question de droit suffisamment sérieuse.

Motifs

Droit de garde - art. 3

La Oberster Gerichtshof (Cour suprême) rappela que les conditions de l'illicéité de l'article 3 de la Convention de la Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants étaient cumulatives et souligna que si le droit du père ne comportait pas le droit de co-déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant, alors le déplacement n'était pas illicite.

L'article 3 imposait la méconnaissance d'un droit de garde exclusif ou conjoint. En cas de séparation des parents, seul remplit cette condition le parent avec lequel vit l'enfant : l'exercice d'un simple droit de visite ne suffit pas.

En l'espèce la Cour releva qu'il était incontesté qu'au moment du déplacement le père ne disposait pas d'un droit de co-déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant. Même d'un point de vue purement pratique, le père n'exerçait qu'un simple droit de visite.

Droit de visite - art. 21


Si le recours mentionnait l'article 21 de la Convention de la Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants, cela ne suffisait pas à justifier le retour de l'enfant puisque l'article 8 de la Convention de la Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants exigeait la violation d'un droit de garde et non d'un simple droit de visite.

Auteur du résumé: Aude Fiorini

Commentaire INCADAT

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.