CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 830

Court

Country

AUSTRALIA

Name

Family Court of Australia

Level

First Instance

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

22 November 2005

Status

Final

Grounds

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12 | Consent - Art. 13(1)(a)

Order

Return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1)(a)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(1)(a)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to

-

Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Consent
Classifying Consent
Establishing Consent
Consent and Alleged Deception
Prospective Consent

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to a baby girl who was 9 months old at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. She was born and lived in England, but had also spent 4 months in Australia. The parents were not married and separated a few months after the birth. On 6 September 2004 the mother unilaterally removed the child to Australia. The father initiated return proceedings.

Ruling

Return ordered; the removal was wrongful and consent had not been established.

Grounds

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12

The mother alleged that the father had consented to the removal and the court turned to consider whether the issue of consent, if established, would be relevant to whether the removal was in fact wrongful. The Court accepted the finding of the English Court of Appeal in Re P (A Child)(Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 591] that consent did not fall to be considered for the purposes of establishing wrongfulness, but, it explored the meaning of the expression ' prima facie breach' which was used in the appellate judgment. It was argued for the mother that the classification of a prima facie breach should be regarded as an intermediary step and if consent were established the Court should then make a finding that there had been no breach. The Court rejected this argument and held that the appropriate interpretation to be given to the terminology used by the English Court of Appeal was that once it is established that a removal, or retention, was contrary to or interferes with rights of custody, that will be sufficient to find that the removal, or retention, was in breach of those rights. There could be no other interpretation of what may have been meant, which could be consistent with Article 3, nor the Convention read as a whole; and consistent also with the Court of Appeal's determination that consent does not fall to be considered for the purpose of establishing wrongfulness as otherwise there would be no need for Article 13 at all. Consequently it was not open to characterise the discharge of the onus under Article 13(1)(a) as in any sense a 'justification' of the act considered to be wrongful.

Consent - Art. 13(1)(a)

The mother's case that the father had consented to the removal was based on actions of and statements by the father. There was though no independent evidence to support the case of either side. A key argument for the mother was that in the aftermath of the separation in June 2004 she announced that it was her intention to return to Australia and the father had replied that this could not happen soon enough. The Court held however that this retort had to be considered in the context of the ending of the relationship and fell short of being a clear and unequivocal communication of consent on which the mother could properly rely. In this the trial judge referred by analogy to the comments of Lord Browne-Wilkinson in the English House of Lords' decision Re H. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46]. In the light of all the evidence the trial judge concluded that there were no grounds for rejecting the father's testimony and that there were inconsistencies and improbabilities in the mother's evidence. She concluded by stating that even if she had found there to have been consent she would have exercised her discretion to make a return order.

INCADAT comment

In applying the comments of Lord Browne-Wilkinson in the English House of Lords' decision Re H. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 46] with regard to acquiescence to consent the Family Court was following the example of the English Court of Appeal in: Re P. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 179].

Classifying Consent

The classification of consent has given rise to difficulty. Some courts have indeed considered that the issue of consent goes to the wrongfulness of the removal or retention and should therefore be considered within Article 3, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 312];

France
CA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340, [INCADAT cite : HC/E/FR 897];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 54];

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1014].

Although the issue had ostensibly been settled in English case law, that consent was to be considered under Art 13(1) a), neither member of the two judge panel of the Court of Appeal appeared entirely convinced of this position. 

Reference can equally be made to examples where trial courts have not considered the Art 3 - Art 13(1) a) distinction, but where consent, in terms of initially going along with a move, has been treated as relevant to wrongfulness, see:

Canada
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 969];

Switzerland
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 425];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 186].

The case was not considered in terms of the Art 3 - Art 13(1) a) distinction, but given that the father initially went along with the relocation it was held that there would be neither a wrongful removal or retention.

The majority view is now though that consent should be considered in relation to Article 13(1) a), see:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 830];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 53];

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267];

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 591];

Ireland
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 287];

United Kingdom - Scotland
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 997];

For a discussion of the issues involved see Beaumont & McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, 1999 at p. 132 et seq.

Establishing Consent

Different standards have been applied when it comes to establishing the Article 13(1) a) exception based on consent.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In an early first instance decision it was held that ordinarily the clear and compelling evidence which was necessary would need to be in writing or at least evidenced by documentary material, see:

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37].

This strict view has not been repeated in later first instance English cases, see:

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 53];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 55].

In Re K. it was held that while consent must be real, positive and unequivocal, there could be circumstances in which a court could be satisfied that consent had been given, even though not in writing.  Moreover, there could also be cases where consent could be inferred from conduct.

Germany
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 491].

Convincing evidence is required to establish consent.

Ireland
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 817].

The Re K. approach was specifically endorsed by the Irish Supreme Court.

The Netherlands
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NL 318].

Consent need not be for a permanent stay.  The only issue is that there must be consent and that it has been proved convincingly.

South Africa
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

Consent could be express or tacit.

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841];

5P.380/2006 /blb; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 895];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung ) (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 896];

The Swiss Supreme Court has held that with regard to consent and acquiescence, the left behind parent must clearly agree, explicitly or tacitly, to a durable change in the residence of the child.  To this end the burden is on the abducting parent to show factual evidence which would lead to such a belief being plausible.

United States of America
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 808].

There must be a subjective assessment of what the applicant parent was actually contemplating. Consideration must also be given to the nature and scope of the consent.

Consent and Alleged Deception

There are examples of cases where it has been argued that prima facie consent should be vitiated by alleged deception on the part of the abducting parent, see for example:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267].

The fact that a document consenting to the removal of the children was presented to the mother on a pretext did not necessarily lead to the conclusion that it was a trap.  The mother was found to have consented.  But the trial judge nevertheless exercised his discretion to make a return order.

Israel
Family Application 2059/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 940].

Allegation of deception rejected; the father's consent was found to be informed and since it had been relied upon by the mother, the father could not renege on his initial consent to the relocation.

Prospective Consent

There is authority that consent might validly be given to a future removal, see:

Canada
Decision of 4 September 1998 [1998] R.D.F. 701, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 333].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re L. (Abduction: Future Consent) [2007] EWHC 2181 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 915; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 993].

It was held that the happening of the event must be reasonably ascertainable and there must not have been a material change in the circumstances since the consent was given.

United Kingdom - Scotland
Zenel v. Haddow 1993 SC 612, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 76].

For a criticism of the majority view in Zenel v. Haddow, see:

Case commentary 1993 SCLR 872 at 884, 885;

G. Maher, Consent to Wrongful Child Abduction under the Hague Convention, 1993 SLT 281;

P. Beaumont and P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, Oxford, 1999 at pp. 129, 130.

Faits

La demande concernait une petite fille âgée de 9 mois à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Elle était née et avait vécu en Angleterre, mais également passé 4 mois en Australie. Ses parents n'étaient pas mariés et s'étaient séparés quelques mois après la naissance. Le 6 septembre 2004, la mère emmena l'enfant en Australie. Le père demanda le retour de sa fille.

Dispositif

Retour ordonné ; le déplacement était illicite et le père n'y avait pas consenti.

Motifs

Déplacement et non-retour - art. 3 et 12

La mère prétendait que le père avait consenti au déplacement et le juge se demanda si un éventuel consentement du père, une fois prouvé, pourrait avoir un impact sur l'illicéité du déplacement. Le juge suivit la décision rendue par la cour d'appel anglaise dans Re P (A Child)(Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 591] et selon laquelle le consentement ne relevait pas de la recherche de l'illicéité, mais il s'interrogea sur le sens de l'expression 'violation prima facie du droit de garde' qui avait été utilisée dans cet arrêt. Selon la mère, la qualification de violation prima facie devait correspondre à une étape intermédiaire de la qualification et, si, ensuite, le consentement était établi, alors le juge devait en tirer les conséquences et considérer qu'il n'y avait pas de violation du droit de garde. La Cour rejeta cet argument, estimant que selon la terminologie utilisée par la Cour d'appel d'Angleterre, une fois établi que le déplacement ou le non-retour était méconnaissait un droit de garde ou interférait avec lui, il convenait de considérer que le déplacement ou le non-retour était intervenu en violation de ce droit. On ne pouvait pas interpréter le sens de l'arrêt autrement si l'on voulait rester cohérent avec l'article 3 et la Convention considérée globalement et maintenir la conclusion de la cour d'appel selon laquelle le consentement ne relève pas de l'établissement de l'illicéité si l'on veut maintenir l'effet utile de l'article 13. Dès lors, on ne pouvait considérer que le renversement de la charge de la preuve imposé par l'article 13 alinéa 1 a comme une forme de justification d'un acte qui restait illicite.

Consentement - art. 13(1)(a)

Selon la mère, les actes et paroles du père permettaient d'établir qu'il avait consenti au déplacement. Toutefois, aucun élément de preuve n'était rapporté au soutien des allégation de l'une et l'autre partie. A la suite de la séparation, en juin 2004, la mère avait annoncé qu'elle avait l'intention de rentrer en Australie et le père avait rétorqué qu'il avait hâte qu'elle s'en aille. La Cour considéra que cette réponse devait être remise dans son contexte : les derniers moments d'une relation et ne constituait pas un élément clair et probant de consentement sur lequel la mère pouvait baser ses actes ultérieurs. En cela, le juge se référa par analogie à la position adptée par Lord Browne-Wilkinson dans la décision de la Chambre des Lords anglaise rendue dans l'affaire Re H. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 46]. Le juge en conclut que les éléments de preuve dont il disposait ne justifiaient pas qu'il ne tienne pas compte du témoignage du père ; il y avait des incohérences dans les éléments de preuve rapportés par la mère. Elle ajouta que même à supposer qu'il y avait eu consentement, elle aurait ordonné son retour dans le cadre de son pouvoir discrétionnaire.

Commentaire INCADAT

En se référant par analogie à la position adptée en matière d'acquiescement par Lord Browne-Wilkinson dans la décision de la Chambre des Lords anglaise rendue dans l'affaire Re H. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 46] le juge suivait l'exemple de la Cour d'appel anglaise dans : Re P. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 179].

Qualification du consentement

La question de savoir si le consentement relève de l'article 3 ou de l'article 13(1) a) a posé difficulté. Certaines juridictions considèrent que le consentement est un élément permettant d'apprécier l'illicéité du déplacement ou du non-retour, et l'apprécient donc dans le cadre de l'article 3. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @312@];

FranceCA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 897];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @54@];

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1014].

Bien que la question eût été a priori réglée par la jurisprudence anglaise, selon laquelle le consentement relevait de l'art. 13(1) a), aucun des deux juges de la Cour d'appel siégeant en l'espèce n'est apparu convaincu par cette position.

On peut aussi évoquer des exemples où des tribunaux de première instance n'ont pas fait référence à la distinction entre l'art. 3 et l'art. 13(1) a) mais où le consentement, en tant qu'acceptation initiale du déménagement, a été considéré comme un élément de l'illicéité, voir:

Canada
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 969], Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 969];

Suisse
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 425]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 186].

L'affaire n'a pas été abordée sous l'angle de la distinction entre l'art. 3 et l'art. 13(1) a), mais étant donné que le père avait initialement accepté le déménagement, il a été considéré qu'il n'y avait eu ni déplacement ni non-retour illicite.

La plupart des décisions révèlent toutefois que la question du consentement est généralement analysée dans le contexte de l'article 13(1) a), voir :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @830@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @53@] ;

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912 ;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @267@] ;

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @591@] ;

Irlande
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @287@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 997].

Pour une analyse des problèmes cités ci-dessus, voir.: P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 132 et seq.

Établissement du consentement

Des exigences différentes ont été appliquées en matière d'établissement d'une exception de l'article 13(1) a) pour consentement.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans une décision de première instance ancienne, il fut considéré qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve claire et impérieuse et qu'en général cette preuve devait être écrite ou en tout cas soutenue par des éléments de preuve écrits. Voir :

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @37@].

Cette approche restrictive n'a pas été maintenue dans des décisions de première instance plus récentes au Royaume-Uni. Voir :

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @53@];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @55@].

Dans Re K. il fut décidé que si le consentement devait être réel, positif and non équivoque, il y avait des situations dans lesquelles le juge pouvait se satisfaire de preuves non écrites du consentement, et qu'il se pouvait même que le consentement fût déduit du comportement.

Allemagne
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE @491@].

Il fut décidé qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve convaincante du consentement.

Irlande
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @817@].

La Cour suprême irlandaise repris expressément les termes de Re K.

Pays-Bas
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL @318@].

Le consentement peut ne pas porter sur un séjour permanent, pourvu que le consentement à un séjour au moins temporaire soit établi de manière convaincante.

Afrique du Sud
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @900@].

Le consentement pouvait être exprès ou tacite.

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@] ;

5P.380/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @895@];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @896@].

Le Tribunal fédéral suisse estima qu'il y avait consentement et acquiescement du parent victime si celui-ci avait accepté, expressément ou implicitement, un changement durable de la résidence de l'enfant. Il appartenait au parent ravisseur d'apporter des éléments de preuve factuels rendant plausible qu'il avait pu croire à ce consentement.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @808@].

Il convenait de rechercher ce que le parent victime avait en tête et également de prendre en compte la nature et l'étendue du consentement.

Consentement et allégation de dol

Certaines affaires illustrent l'idée que ce qui apparaît à première vue comme un consentement pourrait être vicié en raison du dol commis par le parent ravisseur. Voir par exemple :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @267@].

Le fait qu'un document faisant état de son consentement au déplacement des enfants ait été présenté à la mère sous un faux prétexte ne fut pas analysé comme représentant nécessairement une preuve de dol. Il fut conclu que la mère avait bien consenti au déplacement mais le juge décida dans le cadre de son pouvoir discrétionnaire d'ordonner néanmoins le retour.

Israël
Family Application 2059/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL @940@].

Allégation de dol rejetée, le consentement du père était éclairé et puisque la mère y avait cru, le père ne pouvait le rétracter.

Consentement prospectif

Il a été considéré par la jurisprudence que le consentement pouvait validement s'entendre du consentement à un déplacement futur :

Canada
Décision du 4 septembre 1998 [1998] R.D.F. 701, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 333] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re L. (Abduction: Future Consent) [2007] EWHC 2181 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 915; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 993].

Dans cette affaire, le tribunal a décidé que l'accomplissement de l'évènement futur devait pouvoir être établi de manière raisonnable et qu'il ne devait pas y avoir eu de changement matériel des circonstances après que le consentement eût été donné.

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Zenel v. Haddow 1993 SC 612, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 76].

Pour une critique de la position de la majorité des juges dans l'affaire Zenel v. Haddow, voir :

La note suivant le rapport de la décision dans SCLR 1993, p. 872 spec. 884 et 885;

G. Maher, « Consent to Wrongful Child Abduction under the Hague Convention », SLT, 1993, p. 281 ;

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 129 et 130.