AFFAIRE

Télécharger le texte complet EN

Nom de l'affaire

Carrascosa v. McGuire, 520 F.3d 249 (3rd Cir. 2008)

Référence INCADAT

HC/E/ES 970

Juridiction

Pays

États-Unis d'Amérique - Niveau fédéral

Nom

United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit

Degré

Deuxième Instance

États concernés

État requérant

États-Unis d'Amérique

État requis

Espagne

Décision

Date

20 March 2008

Statut

Définitif

Motifs

Déplacement et non-retour - art. 3 et 12 | Droit de garde - art. 3 | Droits de l'homme - art. 20

Décision

Recours rejeté, demande rejetée

Article(s) de la Convention visé(s)

3 20

Article(s) de la Convention visé(s) par le dispositif

3 20

Autres dispositions
Law of New Jersey
Jurisprudence | Affaires invoquées

-

Publiée dans

-

INCADAT commentaire

Mécanisme de retour

Droit de garde
La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention
Interprétation autonome du « droit de garde » et de « l'illicéité »

Exceptions au retour

Sauvegarde des droits de l’homme et des libertés fondamentales
Sauvegarde des droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales

RÉSUMÉ

Résumé disponible en EN | FR

Facts

The Spanish mother and American father married in Spain in 1999. Their daughter was born in New Jersey in 2000.

The couple subsequently separated and in October 2004 the couple, who had legal representation, signed a parenting agreement. This provided, inter alia, that neither parent could take the child outside of the United States without the written consent of the other. The parties did not seek judicial approval of the agreement.

On 10 December 2004 the father petitioned for divorce in New Jersey whilst on 15 December the mother filed a nullity action in Spain. On 12 January 2005 the mother unilaterally took the child to Spain. Subsequently there were numerous hearings in both the United States and Spain.

In June 2005 the father petitioned for the return of the child under the Hague Convention. On 18 January 2006 the Spanish appellate court No. 10 implicitly assigned full custody to the mother, ruling that the parenting agreement was in breach of Art 19 of the Spanish Constitution for it restricted the mother's right as a Spanish citizen to travel freely.

On 24 August the Superior Court of New Jersey ruled that if the mother did not return the child a warrant would be issued for her arrest. This occurred on 1 September with the mother being arrested in New York in late November.

The mother challenged her imprisonment by petitioning the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey for a writ of habeas corpus. This was denied on 8 February 2007. The mother appealed.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and imprisonment of parent upheld; under the law of New Jersey the removal of the child had been wrongful and the mother in not returning the child was in contempt of court.

Grounds

Removal and Retention - Arts 3 and 12

The 3rd Circuit accepted the first instance finding that the Spanish courts had not applied New Jersey law in their determination of the case. Moreover they had paid lip service to the Hague Convention and applied Spanish law in their analysis of the instrument. As the Spanish courts had not acted in accordance with the Hague Convention, there was no obligation on American courts to enforce their judgments.

Rights of Custody - Art. 3

The mother sought to rely on the decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit in Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313] to effect that the father, in enjoying a right of access and a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction, did not possess rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention. This was rejected on the basis that in the present case there was no court order regulating custody and under the law of New Jersey the parents therefore had equal custody rights, and the father was exercising those rights. The 3rd Circuit accepted that the Spanish courts had been wrong to find that the mother had exclusive custody of the child and the father visitation rights.

Human Rights - Art. 20

The mother argued that the decision of appeal court No. 10 should be afforded comity. The 3rd Circuit rejected this argument, and the reasoning which had been used to uphold the application of Article 20 of the Convention. Appeal court No. 10 had held that the Parenting Agreement restricted the rights of Spanish citizens (mother & child) to choose freely where they would travel and live and hence this was a justification for a refusal to return the child. The 3rd Circuit noted that there were no restrictions on the mother, only on the child. It continued: “To say a country can decline to return a child to the child’s habitual residence on the theory that the child’s right to travel is a ‘fundamental freedom’ that would be violated by the return has the effect of rendering the Hague Convention meaningless.”

INCADAT comment

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Autonomous Interpretation of 'Rights of Custody' And 'Wrongfulness'

Conflicts have on occasion emerged between courts in different Contracting States as to the outcomes in individual cases.  This has primarily been with regard to the interpretation of custody rights or the separate, but related issue of the ‘wrongfulness' of a removal or retention.

Conflict Based on Scope of ‘Rights of Custody'

Whilst the overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted a uniform interpretation of rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention, some differences do exist.A

For example: in New Zealand a very broad view prevails - Gross v. Boda [1995] 1 NZLR 569 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 66].  But in parts of the United States of America a narrow view is favoured - Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313].

Consequently where a return petition involves either of these States a conflict may arise with the other Contracting State as to whether a right of custody does or does not exist and therefore whether the removal or retention is wrongful.

New Zealand / United Kingdom - England & Wales
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

A positive determination of wrongfulness by the courts in the child's State of habitual residence in New Zealand was rejected by the English Court of Appeal which found the applicant father to have no rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

United Kingdom  - Scotland / United States of America (Virginia)
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494].

For the purposes of Scots law the removal of the child was in breach of actually exercised rights of custody.  This view was however rejected by the US Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit.

United States of America / United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 591].

Making a return order the English Court of Appeal held that the rights given to the father by the New York custody order were rights of custody for Convention purposes, whether or not New York state or federal law so regarded them whether for domestic purposes or Convention purposes.

Conflict Based on Interpretation of ‘Wrongfulness'

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The Court of Appeal has traditionally held the view that the issue of wrongfulness is a matter for law of the forum, regardless of the law of the child's State of habitual residence.

Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 8].

Whilst the respondent parent had the right under Colorado law to remove their child out of the jurisdiction unilaterally the removal was nevertheless regarded as being wrongful by the English Court of Appeal.

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 591];

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

In the most extreme example this reasoning was applied notwithstanding an Article 15 declaration to the contrary, see:

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 866].

However, this finding was overturned by the House of Lords which unanimously held that where an Article 15 declaration is sought the ruling of the foreign court as to the content of the rights held by the applicant must be treated as conclusive, save in exceptional cases where, for example, the ruling has been obtained by fraud or in breach of the rules of natural justice:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

Elsewhere there has been an express or implied preference for the general application of the law of the child's State of habitual residence to the issue of wrongfulness, see:

Australia
S. Hanbury-Brown and R. Hanbury-Brown v. Director General of Community Services (Central Authority) (1996) FLC 92-671, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 69];

Austria
3Ob89/05t, Oberster Gerichtshof, 11/05/2005 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 855];

6Ob183/97y, Oberster Gerichtshof, 19/06/1997 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 557];

Canada
Droit de la famille 2675, Cour supérieure de Québec, 22 April 1997, No 200-04-003138-979[INCADAT cite : HC/E/CA 666];

Germany
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 822];

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 944];

United States of America
Carrascosa v. McGuire, 520 F.3d 249 (3rd Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 970].

The United States Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit refused to recognize a Spanish non-return order, finding that the Spanish courts had applied their own law rather than the law of New Jersey in assessing whether the applicant father held rights of custody.

The European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
The ECrtHR has been prepared to intervene where interpretation of rights of custody has been misapplied:

Monory v. Hungary & Romania, (2005) 41 E.H.R.R. 37, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 802].

In Monory the ECrtHR found that there had been a breach of the right to family life in Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) where the Romanian courts had so misinterpreted Article 3 of the Hague Convention that the guarantees of the latter instrument itself were violated.

Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Faits

La mère, espagnole, et le père, américain, s'étaient mariés en Espagne en 1999. Leur fille était née dans le New Jersey en 2000.

Le couple le sépara et, en octobre 2004, accompagnés de leurs avocats, signa un accord concernant la garde de l'enfant. Cet accord prévoyait, entre autres, qu'aucun parent ne pouvait sortir l'enfant du territoire américain sans l'accord de l'autre. Les parents ne demandèrent pas l'homologation judiciaire de cet accord.

Le 10 décembre 2004, le père saisit les juridictions du New Jersey d'une demande de divorce tandis que la mère, le 15 décembre, demanda l'annulation de son mariage devant les autorités espagnoles. Le 12 janvier 2005, la mère emmena unilatéralement l'enfant en Espagne. Plusieurs audiences furent tenues aux Etats-Unis et en Espagne.

En juin 2005, le père demanda le retour de l'enfant sur le fondement de la Convention de La Haye. Le 18 janvier 2006, la cour d'appel espagnole No 10 accorda implicitement la garde à la mère au motif que l'accord de garde des parents violait l'article 19 de la Constitution espanole en restreignant le droit d'aller et venir de la mère en tant que ressortissante espagnole.

Le 24 août une juridiction du New Jersey décida que si la mère ne ramenait pas l'enfant, un mandat d'arrêt serait délivré à son encontre. C'est ce qui se produisit et la mère fut arrêtée à New York fin novembre.

La mère contesta son emprisonnement devant les autorités fédérales du New Jersey invoquant l'habeas corpus. Sa demande fut rejetée le 8 février 2007. La mère forma appel de cette décision.

Dispositif

Appel rejeté et emprisonnement de la mère confirmé; selon le droit du New Jersey, le déplacement de l'enfant était illicite et la mère, en refusant de renvoyer l'enfant avait violé une décision judiciaire.

Motifs

Déplacement et non-retour - art. 3 et 12

La juridiction du 3ème ressort fédéral confirma la décision de première instance selon laquelle les tribunaux espagnols n'avaient pas appliqué le droit du New Jersey, mais avaient simplement vaguement cité la convention de La Haye et appliqué le droit espagnol dans le cadre de leur analyse de cet instrument. Etant donné que les autorités espagnoles n'avaient pas agi conformément aux termes de la Convention, les juridictions américaines n'étaient en rien obligées de reconnaître et exécuter les décisions espagnoles.

Droit de garde - art. 3

The mother sought to rely on the decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit in Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313] to effect that the father, in enjoying a right of access and a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction, did not possess rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention. This was rejected on the basis that in the present case there was no court order regulating custody and under the law of New Jersey the parents therefore had equal custody rights, and the father was exercising those rights. The 3rd Circuit accepted that the Spanish courts had been wrong to find that the mother had exclusive custody of the child and the father visitation rights. La mère invoquait la décision du 2ème ressort fédéral rendue en appel dans l'affaire Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313], estimant que le père disposant d'un droit de visite et d'un droit de veto concernant la sortie du territoire de l'enfant, n'avait pas de droit de garde selon la Convention. Cet argument fut rejeté au motif qu'en l'espèce aucune décision judiciaire n'avait été rendue quant à la garde de l'enfant. En application du droit du New Jersey, les parents avaient donc la garde conjointe de l'enfant et la cour constata que le père exerçait effectivement ce droit. La cour du 3ème ressort décida que les juridictions espagnoles n'auraient pas dû considérer que la mère avait la garde exclusive de l'enfant et le père un simple droit de garde.

Droits de l'homme - art. 20

La mère arguait de ce que la décision espagnole aurait dû pouvoir déployer ses effets aux Etats-Unis selon le principe de la courtoisie. La Cour du 3ème ressort rejeta cette position ainsi que le raisonnement qui conduisait à l'application de l'article 20. La cour espagnole avait estimé que l'accord de garde parental méconnaissait le droit fondamental d'aller et venir des citoyens espagnols (mère et enfant) et que cela justifiait le refus du retour de l'enfant. La cour du 3ème ressort souligna que l'accord n'imposait aucune restriction à la mère, mais simplement à l'enfant et observa que "dire qu'un Etat peut refuser d'ordonner le retour de l'enfant dans l'Etat de sa résidence habituelle en application de l'idée que le droit de l'enfant de voyager est un droit fondamental qui serait violé par le retour revient à ôter tout sens à la Convention de La Haye".

Commentaire INCADAT

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.

Interprétation autonome du « droit de garde » et de « l'illicéité »

Des conflits se sont parfois fait jour entre des juridictions de plusieurs États contractants traitant des mêmes affaires. Ces conflits se sont particulièrement manifestés dans le cadre de l'interprétation de la notion de droit de garde et de celle de l'illicéité du déplacement ou du non-retour.

Conflits relatifs à la notion de « droit de garde »

Bien que la plupart des États contractants aient adopté une interprétation uniforme de la notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention, des différences subsistent.

Ainsi en Nouvelle-Zélande, une interprétation très libérale est privilégiée - Gross v. Boda [1995] 1 NZLR 569 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 66]. Au contraire, aux États-Unis d'Amérique, c'est une interprétation très restrictive qui prévaut - Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313].

De la sorte, lorsqu'une demande de retour concerne des États aux positions différentes, un conflit peut naître quant à la question de savoir si tel parent avait un droit de garde et si le déplacement ou le non-retour était illicite.

Nouvelle-Zélande / Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809]

La Cour d'appel anglaise rejeta une attestation d'illicéité délivrée par l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant, la Nouvelle-Zélande. Selon la Cour d'appel, le père n'avait pas de droit de garde selon la Convention.

Royaume-Uni - Écosse / États-Unis d'Amérique (Virginie)
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494]

Du point de vue du droit écossais, le déplacement de l'enfant était intervenu en violation d'un droit de garde effectivement exercé. Cette position fut rejetée par la Cour d'appel fédérale du quatrième ressort aux États-Unis.

États-Unis d'Amérique/ Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 591]

Pour ordonner le retour de l'enfant, la Cour d'appel anglaise décida que le droit que conférait au père une décision new-yorkaise était un droit de garde au sens de la Convention, le fait que ce droit soit ou non caractérisé de droit de garde au sens de la Convention ou au sens du droit new-yorkais commun fédéral ou étatique important peu.

Conflit concernant « l'illicéité »

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
La Cour d'appel a traditionnellement considéré que la question de l'illicéité relevait de la loi du for, le droit de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant étant sans pertinence.

Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights Abroad) [1995] Fam 224 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 8]

Alors que le défendeur avait le droit selon la loi en vigueur au Colorado de déplacer unilatéralement l'enfant hors du territoire, la Cour d'appel anglaise considéra le déplacement comme illicite.

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 591]

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809]

L'affaire Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 866] offre l'exemple le plus extrême de cette jurisprudence, le raisonnement étant appliqué nonobstant une déclaration de l'article 15 contraire.

Toutefois cette décision fut annulée par la Chambre des Lords qui, dans une décision unanime, considéra que si une déclaration de l'article 15 est demandée, alors la cour est liée par le contenu de cette déclaration étrangère, sauf dans des cas exceptionnels où, par exemple, la déclaration a été frauduleusement obtenue ou a été rendue en violation d'un principe de justice naturelle :

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Dans d'autres pays, les juridictions ont préféré faire application expresse ou tacite de la loi de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant afin de déterminer l'illicéité du déplacement. Voir :

Australie
S. Hanbury-Brown and R. Hanbury-Brown v. Director General of Community Services (Central Authority) (1996) FLC 92-671, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 69] ;

Autriche
3Ob89/05t, Oberster Gerichtshof, 11/05/2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 855] ;

6Ob183/97y, Oberster Gerichtshof, 19/06/1997 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 557] ;

Canada
Droit de la famille 2675, Cour supérieure de Québec, 22 avril 1997, No 200-04-003138-979 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 666] ;

Allemagne
11 UF 121/03, Oberlandesgericht Hamm, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 822] ;

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 944] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Carrascosa v. McGuire, 520 F.3d 249 (3rd Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 970].

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel du 3e ressort a refusé de reconnaître une décision espagnole de non-retour, estimant que les tribunaux espagnols auraient dû appliquer non pas leur droit mais le droit du New Jersey pour déterminer si le père avait un droit de garde.

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
La CourEDH est intervenue dans une affaire où le droit de garde avait été mal interprété.

Monory v. Hungary & Romania, (2005) 41 E.H.R.R. 37, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 802].

Dans cette espèce, la CourEDH estima que les tribunaux roumains avaient violé l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH) en méconnaissant le sens de l'article 3 de la Convention de La Haye d'une manière si grossière que les garanties de cet instruments étaient elles-mêmes méconnues.

Sauvegarde des droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.