CASE

Download full text EN

Case Name

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/EE 1177

Court

Name

European Court of Human Rights

Level

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

Judge(s)
Nina Vajić (President); Anatoly Kovler, Peer Lorenzen, Khanlar Hajiyev, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos, Erik Møse (Judges); Søren Nielsen (Section Registrar)

States involved

Requesting State

ITALY

Requested State

ESTONIA

Decision

Date

15 May 2012

Status

Final

Grounds

European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

-

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland [GC], No 41615/07, ECHR 2010; Raban v. Romania, No 25437/08, 26 October 2010; Šneersone and Kampanella v. Italy, No 14737/09, 12 July 2011; X v. Latvia, No 27853/09, 13 December 2011; Maire v. Portugal, No 48206/99, ECHR 2003 VII; Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, No 31679/96, ECHR 2000 I; Bianchi v. Switzerland, No 7548/04, 22 June 2006; Carlson v. Switzerland, No 49492/06, 6 November 2008; Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No 39388/05, 6 December 2007; Gnahoré v. France, No 40031/98, ECHR 2000 IX; Hokkanen v. Finland, 23 September 1994, Series A No. 299 A; Kutzner v. Germany, No 46544/99, ECHR 2002 I; Tiemann v. France and Germany (dec.), Nos. 47457/99 and 47458/99, ECHR 2000 IV; Lipkowsky and McCormack v. Germany (dec.), No 26755/10, 18 January 2011.

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse
Economic Factors
Primary Carer Abductions
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR)
European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The proceedings related to a child born in Italy in June 2009 to an Estonian mother and an Italian father. Following the birth relations between the parents deteriorated. Mother and child travelled to Estonia on several occasions. On 2 March 2011, the mother again took the child to Estonia, but they did not return as agreed on 11 March.

On 7 March, the mother applied to the Tartu County Court for sole custody. On 16 March, the father travelled to Estonia, but he did not see his daughter as the mother only agreed for contact to happen in the offices of a law firm. On 29 March 2011, the father made a request to the Italian Ministry of Justice for the child's return under the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention. On 10 May 2011, the father's return application was filed in the Tartu County Court in Estonia.

On 7 October 2011, the Tartu County Court found the retention of the child to be wrongful and held that the Article 13(1)(b) exception had not been made out. In this it held that: the child's return would not cause her more suffering than it would an average two-year-old; given the available evidence - including expert opinions - it could not be concluded that the father had ill-treated the child or been violent towards the mother and it could not be held that the child's return would be contrary to her interests.

The Court dismissed the mother's arguments based on the child's separation from her, in this it noted that the Hague Convention did not provide for the return of the child to the applicant parent, but to the other country. The Court held that the mother's argument surrounding the impossibility of her return to Italy because of the risk of arrest, were irrelevant because the Italian authorities could in any event make use of the European arrest warrant to secure her extradition.

On 12 December 2011, the Tartu Court of Appeal upheld the trial court's ruling. It noted that under the Hague Convention the child's swift return to her habitual residence was presumed to be in her best interests. The Court of Appeal concluded that the return of the child would not necessarily lead to her separation from the mother and that she would not be placed in an intolerable situation.

The mother's evidence, which the trial Court had disregarded, did not demonstrate reliably that the father had abused the child. The Court found that the parents' mutual accusations indicated that there were strained relations between them, but did not prove the existence of the grounds for refusing the return of the child under Article 13(1)(b).

In February 2012, the Supreme Court declined to examine the case. On 29 February 2012, the mother received a bailiff's notice that the child was to be returned to Italy within 10 days. On 2 March 2012, a hearing took place before the Milan Youth Court in Italy at which mother and child were present.

On 6 March 2012, mother and child filed an application with the European Court of Human Rights relying on Articles 3, 6(1), 8 and 14 of the ECHR, that the Estonian courts' decision to order the child's return to Italy had been in breach of international law and contrary to the practice of the European Court of Human Rights (Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Grand Chamber), Application No 41615/07 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]; Raban v. Romania, Application No. 25437/08 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1330]; Šneersone and Kampanella v. Italy, Application No. 14737/09 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1152] and X. v. Latvia, Application No 27853/09 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146].

The Court exercised its power of characterisation to rule that the applicants' complaints fell to be examined under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR).

Ruling

Application that the Estonian courts' decision to return the child to Italy had been in breach of international law and contrary to the practice of the European Court of Human Rights declared inadmissible.

Grounds

European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)

The Court held that Article 8 of the ECHR was applicable since the Estonian decisions interfered with the applicants' right to family life, whether due to the difficulties of continuing to live together or to the inherent obligation to relocate to another country.

The Court then considered the application of Article 8. As regards the lawfulness of the interference, the Court noted that the Hague Convention had been incorporated into Estonian law and that the return petition had been dealt with by competent courts at three levels of jurisdiction and that the courts had concluded in reasoned decisions, showing no sign of arbitrariness, that the retention was wrongful and that the child should be returned to Italy.

Consequently, the return decision was "in accordance with the law" within the meaning of Article 8(2) of the ECHR. The Court further noted that the domestic courts' decisions pursued the legitimate aim of protecting the rights and freedoms of the child and her father.

Turning to whether the interference with the applicants' rights was "necessary in a democratic society" within the meaning of Article 8(2) of the ECHR, the Court noted first that the Estonian courts did not order the return of the child automatically or mechanically. The applicants were able to present their case fully. "The fact certain requests [...] for an additional hearing, the examination of witnesses and a psychiatric expert examination [of the child] were dismissed did not render the proceedings unfair."

The Court stated that it attached "particular importance in this context to the need to conduct the proceedings in question swiftly and to the fact that these proceedings were not meant to determine the merits of the custody issue (Article 19 of the Hague Convention)".

As to whether the domestic authorities had succeeded in striking a fair balance between the various interests at stake, bearing in mind the child's best interests were the primary consideration and whether they had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation, the Court observed that the Estonian courts had "based their decisions on ample evidence adduced by the parties and obtained by the courts themselves".

The Court noted that the domestic authorities had proceeded from the presumption that pursuant to the rationale of the Hague Convention, the immediate return of the child to her habitual place of residence was in her best interests and it also had a general preventive effect.

Therefore, the courts had considered that the return of the child could only be refused in exceptional circumstances. In this the Court cited its own previous decisions Maumousseau and Washington v. France, Application No. 39388/05 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942] and Lipkowsky and McCormack v. Germany, Application No. 26755/10 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201], where it had also found that the exceptions for not returning a child under the Hague Convention had to be interpreted strictly.

The Court rejected the mother's arguments that the Estonian courts had failed to analyse the evidence in the case. The Court did not find "any degree of arbitrariness on the part of the Estonian courts in not attaching paramount importance to the fact that [the mother] had reported the [father] for committing certain offences". The Court noted that the presumption of innocence was a right which was also protected under the ECHR.

As to the mother's argument that the father would continue to work and the child would be cared for by grandparents or carers, the Court noted that the Hague Convention could not be deemed to determine custody rights. Turning to the mother's argument that it would be impossible for her to return to Italy, the Court held, inter alia, that it was not for it to assess the probability of the mother's arrest by the Italian authorities.

The Court also noted that the mother had lived in Italy for a certain period of time. It therefore concluded that the Estonian courts, in dismissing the mother's arguments about the impossibility of return, had not overstepped their margin of appreciation. In the light of all these findings the Court ruled that the complaints of the mother and child were manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected. The application was held to be inadmissible.

Author of the summary: Peter McEleavy

INCADAT comment

Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse

Courts have responded in different ways when faced with allegations that the left-behind parent has acted inappropriately or sexually abused the wrongfully removed or retained children. In the most straightforward cases the accusations may simply be dismissed as unfounded. Where this is not possible courts have been divided as to whether a detailed investigation should be undertaken in the State of refuge, or, whether the relevant assessment should be conducted in the State of habitual residence, with interim measures being taken to attempt to protect the child on his return.

- Accusations Dismissed:

Belgium

Civ. Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/BE 706]

The father claimed that the mother sought the return of the child to have her declared mentally incapable and to sell her organs. The Court held, however, that even if the father's accusations were firmly held, they were not backed up by any evidence.
 
Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 666]
 
The Court held that if the mother had serious concerns with regard to her son, then she would not have left him in the care of the father on holiday after what she claimed there had been a serious incident.
 
J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, No 500-04-046027-075 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 968]

The mother claimed that a grave risk arose because the father was a sexual predator.
The Court noted that such allegations had been rejected in foreign proceedings. It equally drew attention to the fact that Convention proceedings concerned the return of the child and not the issue of custody. The fears of the mother and of the maternal grandparents were deemed to be largely irrational. There was also no proof that the judicial authorities in the State of habitual residence were corrupt. The Court instead expressed concerns about the actions of members of the maternal family (who had abducted the child notwithstanding the existence of three court orders to the contrary) as well as the mental state of the mother, who had kept the child in a state of fear of the father.

France
CA Amiens, 4 mars 1998, No de RG 5704759 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 704]

The Court rejected the allegation of physical violence against the father; if there had been violence, it was not of the level required to activate Article 13(1)(b).

New Zealand
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 303]

The Court rejected arguments by the mother that the father's alleged sexual practices would place the child at a grave risk of harm. The Court held that there was no evidence a return would expose the child to the level of harm contemplated under Article 13(1)(b).

Switzerland
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Appellate Court of the Canton Zurich), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 426]

The mother argued that the father was a danger to the children because, inter alia, he had sexually abused the daughter. In rejecting this accusation, the Court noted that the mother had previously been willing to leave the children in the father's sole care whilst she went abroad.

- Return ordered with investigation to be carried out in the State of habitual residence:

United Kingdom - England and Wales

N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 19]

The possible risk to the daughter needed to be investigated in the pending custody proceedings in Australia. In the interim, the child needed protection. However, this protection did not require the refusal of the application for her return. Such risk of physical harm as might exist was created by unsupervised contact to the father, not by return to Australia.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 361]

It was argued that the allegations of sexual abuse by the mother's cohabitee were of such a nature as to activate the Article 13(1)(b) exception. This was rejected by the Court. In doing this the Court noted that the Swedish authorities were aware of the case and had taken steps to ensure that the child would be protected upon her return: she would be placed in an analysis home with her mother. If the mother did not agree to this, the child would be placed in care. The Court also noted that the mother had now separated from her cohabitee.

Finland
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 360]

When considering whether the allegations of the father's sexual abuse of his daughter constituted a barrier to returning the children, the Court noted that one of the objectives of the Hague Child Abduction Convention was that the forum for the determination of custody issues was not to be changed at will and that the credibility of allegations as to the personal characteristics of the petitioner were most properly investigated in the spouses' common State of habitual residence. In addition, the Court noted that a grave risk of harm did not arise if the mother were to return with the children and saw to it that their living conditions were arranged in their best interests. Accordingly, the Court found that there was no barrier to the return of the children.

Ireland
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IE 389]

The Irish Supreme Court accepted that there was prima facie evidence of sexual abuse by the father and that the children should not be returned into his care. However, it found that the trial judge had erred in concluding that this amounted to a grave risk of harm in returning the children to England per se. In the light of the undertakings given by the father, there would be no grave risk in returning the children to live in the former matrimonial home in the sole care of their mother.

- Investigation to be undertaken in the State of refuge:

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/HK 595]

The Court of Appeal criticised the fact that the return order had been made conditional on the acts of a third party (the Swiss Central Authority) over whom China's (Hong Kong SAR) Court had neither jurisdiction nor control. The Court ruled that unless and until the allegations could be discounted altogether or after investigation could be found to have no substance, it was almost inconceivable that the trial court's discretion could reasonably and responsibly be exercised to return the child to the environment in which the alleged abuse took place.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. 2002) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 459]

The Court of Appeals for the First Circuit ruled that great care had to be exercised before returning a child where there existed credible evidence of the child having suffered sexual abuse. It further stated that a court should be particularly wary about using potentially unenforceable undertakings to try to protect a child in such situations.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 971]

The District Court had appointed an independent expert in paediatrics, child abuse, child sexual abuse and child pornography, to assess whether the photographs of the sons constituted child pornography and whether the behaviour problems suffered by the children were indications of sexual abuse. The expert reported that there was no evidence to suggest that the father was a paedophile, that he was sexually aroused by children, or that the pictures were pornographic. The expert approved of the German investigations and stated that they were accurate assessments and that their conclusions were consistent with their reported observations. The expert determined that the symptoms that the boys displayed were consistent with the stress in their lives caused by the acrimonious custody dispute and recommended that the boys not undergo further sexual abuse evaluation because it would increase their already-dangerous stress levels.

- Return Refused:

United Kingdom - Scotland

Q., Petitioner [2001] SLT 243 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 341]

The Court held that there was a possibility that the allegations of abuse were true. It was also possible that the child, if returned, could be allowed into the unsupervised company of the alleged abuser. The Court equally noted that a court in another Hague Convention country would be able to provide adequate protection. Consequently it was possible for a child to be returned where an allegation of sexual abuse had been made. However, on the facts, the Court ruled that in light of what had happened in France during the course of the various legal proceedings, the courts there might not be able or willing to provide adequate protection for the children. Consequently, the risk amounted to a grave risk that the return of the girl would expose her to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place her in an intolerable situation.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 597]

Having found that sexual abuse had occurred, the Court of Appeals ruled that this rendered immaterial the father's arguments that the courts of Sweden could take ameliorative actions to prevent further harm once the children had been returned. The Court of Appeals held that in such circumstances, Article 13(1)(b) did not require separate consideration either of undertakings or of the steps which might be taken by the courts of the country of habitual residence.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Economic Factors

Article 13(1)(b) and Economic Factors

There are many examples, from a broad range of Contracting States, where courts have declined to uphold the Article 13(1)(b) exception where it has been argued that the taking parent (and hence the children) would be placed in a difficult financial situation were a return order to be made.

Australia
Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]

The fact that the mother could not accompany the child to England for financial reasons or otherwise was no reason for non-compliance with the clear obligation that rests upon the Australian courts under the terms of the Convention.

Canada
Y.D. v. J.B. [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que. C.A.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 369]

Financial weakness was not a valid reason for refusing to return a child. The Court stated: "The signatories to the Convention did not have in mind the protection of children of well-off parents only, leaving exposed and incapable of applying for the return of a wrongfully removed child the parent without wealth whose child was so abducted."

France
CA Lyon, 19 septembre 2011, No de RG 11/02919 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 1168]

The existence of more favourable living conditions in France could not be taken into consideration.

Germany
7 UF 39/99, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 821]

New Zealand
K.M.A. v. Secretary for Justice [2007] NZFLR 891 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 1118]

Financial hardship was not proven on the facts; moreover, the Court of Appeal considered it most unlikely that the Australian authorities would not provide some form of special financial and legal assistance, if required.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
In early case law, the Court of Appeal repeatedly rejected arguments that economic factors could justify finding the existence of an intolerable situation for the purposes of Article 13(1)(b).

Re A. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] Fam 106 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 48]

In this case, the court decided that dependency on State benefits cannot be said in itself to constitute an intolerable situation.

B. v. B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 32, [1993] 2 All ER 144, [1993] 1 FLR 238, [1993] Fam Law 198 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 10]

In this case, it was said that inadequate housing / financial circumstances did not prevent return.

Re M. (Abduction: Undertakings) [1995] 1 FLR 1021 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 20]

The Court suggested that the exception might be established were young children to be left homeless, and without recourse to State benefits. However, to be dependent on Israeli State benefits, or English State benefits, could not be said to constitute an intolerable situation.

United Kingdom - Scotland
Starr v. Starr, 1999 SLT 335 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 195]

IGR, Petitioner [2011] CSOH 208  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 1154]

Switzerland
5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

Zimbabwe
Secretary For Justice v. Parker 1999 (2) ZLR 400 (H) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ZW 340]

There are some examples where courts have placed emphasis on the financial circumstances (or accommodation arrangements) that a child / abductor would face, in deciding whether or not to make a return order:

Australia
Harris v. Harris [2010] FamCAFC 221 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 1119]

The financially precarious position in which the mother would find herself were a return order to be made was a relevant consideration in the making of a non-return order.

France
CA Paris, 13 avril 2012, No de RG 12/0617 [INCADAT Reference : HC/E/FR 1189]

In this case, inadequate housing was a relevant factor in the consideration of a non-return order.

Netherlands
De directie Preventie, optredend voor zichzelf en namens Y (de vader /the father) against X (de moeder/ the mother) (7 February 2001, ELRO nr.AA9851 Zaaknr:813-H-00) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NL 314]

In this case, financial circumstances were a relevant factor in the consideration of a non-return order.

United Kingdom - Scotland
C. v. C. 2003 S.L.T. 793 [INCADAT Reference : HC/E/UKs 998]

An example where financial circumstances did lead to a non-return order being made.

A, Petitioner [2011] CSOH 215, 2012 S.L.T. 370 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 1153]

In this case, adequate accommodation and financial support were relevant factors in the consideration of a non-return order.

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
Šneersone and Kampanella v. Italy (Application No 14737/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1152]

The ECrtHR, in finding that there had been a breach of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in the return of a child from Latvia to Italy, noted that the Italian courts exercising their powers under the Brussels IIa Regulation, had overlooked the fact that it was not financially viable for the mother to return with the child: she spoke no Italian and was virtually unemployable.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Primary Carer Abductions

The issue of how to respond when a taking parent who is a primary carer threatens not to accompany a child back to the State of habitual residence if a return order is made, is a controversial one.

There are examples from many Contracting States where courts have taken a very strict approach so that, other than in exceptional situations, the Article 13(1)(b) exception has not been upheld where the non-return argument has been raised, see:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 764]

In this case, a non-return order was made since the facts were exceptional. There had been a genuine threat to the mother, which had put her quite obviously and rightfully in fear for her safety if she returned to Israel. The mother was taken to Israel on false pretences, sold to the Russian Mafia and re-sold to the father who forced her into prostitution. She was locked in, beaten by the father, raped and threatened. The mother was genuinely in a state of fear and could not be expected to return to Israel. It would be wholly inappropriate to send the child back without his mother to a father who had been buying and selling women and running a prostitution business.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 269]

However, in a more recent English Court of Appeal judgment, the C. v. C. approach has been refined:

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

In this case, it was ruled that a mother's refusal to return was capable of amounting to a defence because the refusal was not an act of unreasonableness, but came about as a result of an illness she was suffering from. It may be noted, however, that a return order was nevertheless still made. In this context reference may also be made to the decisions of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1068] and Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1147], in which it was accepted that the anxieties of a respondent mother about return, which were not based upon objective risk to her but nevertheless were of such intensity as to be likely, in the event of a return, to destabilise her parenting of the child to the point at which the child's situation would become intolerable, could in principle meet the threshold of the Article 13(1)(b) exception.

Germany
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Previously a much more liberal interpretation had been adopted:
Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 323]

Switzerland
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 1179]

New Zealand
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770]

United Kingdom - Scotland
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 26]

United States of America
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USs 97]

In other Contracting States, the approach taken with regard to non-return arguments has varied:

Australia
In Australia, early Convention case law exhibited a very strict approach adopted with regard to non-return arguments, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]
 
In State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 283], the Family Court of Australia at Melbourne did find the grave risk of harm exception to be established where the mother would not return, but in this case the mother had been denied entry into the United States of America, the child's State of habitual residence.

Following the judgment of the High Court of Australia (the highest court in the Australian judicial system) in the joint appeals DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 346, 347], greater attention has been focused on the post-return situation facing abducted children.

In the context of a primary-carer taking parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence see: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 544]. 

France
In French case law, a permissive approach to Article 13(1)(b) has been replaced with a much more restrictive interpretation. For examples of the initial approach, see:

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 498]

And for examples of the stricter interpretation, see:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
In Israeli case law there are contrasting examples of the judicial response to non-return arguments:
 
Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 832]

in contrast with:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 833]

Poland
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 700]

The Supreme Court noted that it would not be in the child's best interests if she were deprived of her mother's care, were the latter to choose to remain in Poland. However, it equally affirmed that if the child were to stay in Poland it would not be in her interests to be deprived of the care of her father. For these reasons, the Court concluded that it could not be assumed that ordering the return of the child would place her in an intolerable situation.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 701]

The Supreme Court specified that the frequently used argument of the child's potential separation from the taking parent, did not, in principle, justify the application of the exception. It held that where there were no objective obstacles to the return of a taking parent, then it could be assumed that the taking parent considered his own interest to be more important than those of the child.

The Court added that a taking parent's fear of being held criminally liable was not an objective obstacle to return, as the taking parent should have been aware of the consequences of his actions. The situation with regard to infants was however more complicated. The Court held that the special bond between mother and baby only made their separation possible in exceptional cases, and this was so even if there were no objective obstacles to the mother's return to the State of habitual residence. The Court held that where the mother of an infant refused to return, whatever the reason, then the return order should be refused on the basis of Article 13(1)(b). On the facts, return was ordered.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UY 1185]

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
There are decisions of the ECrtHR which have endorsed a strict approach with regard to the compatibility of Hague Convention exceptions and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Some of these cases have considered arguments relevant to the issue of grave risk of harm, including where an abductor has indicated an unwillingness to accompany the returning child, see:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1169]

In this case, the ECrtHR upheld a challenge by the left-behind father that the refusal of the Turkish courts to return his child led to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The ECrtHR stated that whilst very young age was a criterion to be taken into account to determine the child's interest in an abduction case, it could not be considered by itself a sufficient ground, in relation to the requirements of the Hague Convention, to justify dismissal of a return application.

Recourse has been had to expert evidence to assist in ascertaining the potential consequences of the child being separated from the taking parent

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1177]

However, it must equally be noted that since the Grand Chamber ruling in Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, there are examples of a less strict approach being followed. The latter ruling had emphasised the best interests of the individual abducted child in the context of an application for return and the ascertainment of whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation as well as a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, see:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]; and Grand Chamber ruling X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1171]

In this case, a majority found that the return of a child to the United States of America would lead to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The decision-making process of the Belgian Appellate Court as regards Article 13(1)(b) was held not to have met the procedural requirements inherent in Article 8 of the ECHR. The two dissenting judges noted, however, that the danger referred to in Article 13 should not consist only of the separation of the child from the taking parent.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Faits

La procédure concernait une enfant née en Italie en juin 2009 d'une mère estonienne et d'un père italien. Après la naissance de l'enfant, la relation entre les parents s'est dégradée. La mère et l'enfant se sont rendues en Estonie à plusieurs reprises. Le 2 mars 2011, la mère a de nouveau emmené l'enfant en Estonie, mais contrairement à ce qui était convenu, elle n'est pas rentrée en sa compagnie le 11 mars.

Le 7 mars, la mère avait introduit une demande auprès du Tribunal de comté (County Court) de Tartu en vue d'obtenir la garde exclusive. Le 16 mars, le père s'est rendu en Estonie mais n'a pas vu sa fille dans la mesure où les visites consenties par la mère devaient avoir lieu dans le cabinet d'un avocat.

Le 29 mars 2011, le père a introduit une demande auprès du Ministère italien de la Justice en vue d'obtenir le retour de l'enfant en vertu de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants. Le 10 mai 2011, la demande de retour formée par le père a été déposée devant la County Court de Tartu (Estonie).

Le 7 octobre 2011, la County Court de Tartu a estimé que le non-retour de l'enfant était illicite et que l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b) n'était pas établie, en ce que : l'enfant ne serait pas plus affectée par le retour qu'un autre enfant de deux ans ; étant donné les preuves disponibles - notamment les avis d'experts - rien n'attestait que le père ait maltraité l'enfant ou se soit montré violent envers la mère et il n'était pas établi que le retour serait contraire à l'intérêt de l'enfant.

Le Tribunal a rejeté les arguments de la mère fondés sur le fait qu'elle et l'enfant seraient séparées, notant que la Convention de La Haye prévoyait non pas le retour de l'enfant auprès du parent demandeur, mais son retour dans l'État où il se trouvait avant d'être déplacé. Il a estimé que l'argument de la mère, qui expliquait qu'il lui était impossible de rentrer en Italie car elle risquait d'y être arrêtée, n'était pas pertinent, puisque les autorités italiennes pouvaient dans tous les cas avoir recours à un mandat d'arrêt européen si elles souhaitaient vraiment obtenir son extradition.

Le 12 décembre 2011, la Cour d'appel de Tartu a confirmé la décision rendue en première instance, soulignant qu'en vertu de la Convention de La Haye, assurer un retour rapide de l'enfant dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle est réputé être conforme à son intérêt supérieur. La Cour d'appel en a conclu que le retour de l'enfant n'impliquerait pas nécessairement de la séparer de sa mère et que l'enfant ne serait donc pas placée dans une situation intolérable.

Les preuves apportées par la mère, dont le Tribunal n'a pas tenu compte en première instance, n'attestaient pas de façon incontestable que le père avait maltraité l'enfant. Le Tribunal a estimé que les griefs mutuels des parents étaient révélateurs de leurs relations tendues, mais ne prouvaient pas l'existence de motifs permettant de refuser d'ordonner le retour de l'enfant en vertu de l'article 13(1)(b).

En février 2012, la Cour suprême a refusé d'étudier l'affaire. Le 29 février 2012, la mère a reçu une notification d'huissier lui indiquant que l'enfant devait être ramenée en Italie sous 10 jours. Le 2 mars 2012, une audience s'est tenue devant le Tribunal pour mineurs de Milan (Italie), audience à laquelle mère et enfant ont assisté. 

Le 6 mars 2012, la mère et l'enfant ont saisi la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH) d'une requête ; se fondant sur les articles 3, 6(1), 8 et 14 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH), elles ont affirmé que la décision des tribunaux estoniens ayant ordonné le retour de l'enfant en Italie constituait une violation du droit international et était contraire à la pratique de la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (Neulinger et Shuruk c. Suisse (Grande Chambre), Requête No 41615/07 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1323] ; Raban c. Roumanie, Requête No. 25437/08 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1330] ; Šneersone et Kampanella c. Italie, Requête No. 14737/09 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1152] et X. c. Lettonie, Requête No 27853/09 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1146].

La Cour a exercé son pouvoir de qualification pour juger que les griefs des demandeurs devaient être examinés au regard de l'article 8 de la CEDH.

Dispositif

La requête faisant valoir que la décision des tribunaux estoniens en faveur d'un retour en Italie constituait une violation du droit international et était contraire à la pratique de la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a été déclarée irrecevable.

Motifs

Convention européenne des droits de l’homme (CEDH)

-

Commentaire INCADAT

Allégations de mauvais traitement et abus sexuel

Les tribunaux ont adopté des positions variables lorsqu'ils ont été confrontés à des allégations selon lesquelles le parent délaissé avait fait subir des mauvais traitements ou abus sexuels à l'enfant déplacé ou retenu illicitement. Dans les affaires les plus simples, les accusations ont pu être rejetées comme non fondées. Lorsqu'il n'était pas évident que l'allégation était manifestement non fondée, les tribunaux se sont montrés divisés quant à savoir si une enquête poussée devait être menée dans l'État de refuge ou bien dans l'État de la résidence habituelle, auquel cas des mesures de protection provisoires seraient prises en vue de protéger l'enfant en cas de retour.

- Accusations déclarées non fondées :

Belgique

Civ Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 706]

Le père prétendait que la mère ne voulait le retour de l'enfant que pour la faire déclarer folle et vendre ses organes. Toutefois, le juge releva que si les déclarations du père relevaient d'une profonde conviction, elles n'étaient pas étayées d'éléments de preuve.

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 666]

La Cour décida que si la mère avait eu des craintes sérieuses à propos de son fils, elle ne l'aurait pas laissé aux soins du père pendant les vacances, après ce qu'elle présentait comme un incident sérieux.

J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, N°500-04-046027-075 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 968]

La mère faisait valoir un risque grave au motif que le père était un prédateur sexuel. La Cour rappela que toutes les procédures étrangères avaient rejeté ces allégations, et indiqua qu'il fallait garder en mémoire que la question posée était celle du retour et non de la garde. Elle constata que les craintes de la mère et de ses parents étaient largement irraisonnées, et que la preuve de la corruption des autorités judiciaires de l'État de résidence habituelle n'était pas davantage rapportée. La Cour exprima au contraire une crainte face à la réaction de la famille de la mère (rappelant qu'ils avaient enlevé l'enfant en dépit de 3 interdictions judiciaires de ce faire), ainsi qu'une critique concernant les capacités mentales de la mère, qui avait maintenu l'enfant dans un climat de peur de son père.

France
CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° RG 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation de violence physique du père à l'égard de l'enfant. S'il pouvait y avoir eu des épisodes violents, ils n'étaient pas de nature à caractériser le risque nécessaire à l'application de l'article 13(1)(b).

Nouvelle Zélande
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 303]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation selon laquelle les habitudes sexuelles du père étaient de nature à causer un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant. Elle ajouta que la preuve n'avait pas été apportée que le retour exposerait l'enfant à un risque tel que l'article 13(1)(b) serait applicable.

Suisse
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Cour d'appel du canton de Zurich) (Suisse), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 426]

La mère prétendait que le père constituait un danger pour les enfants parce qu'il avait entre autres abusé sexuellement de l'enfant. Pour rejeter cet argument, la Cour fit observer que la mère avait jusqu'alors laissé l'enfant vivre seul avec son père pendant qu'elle voyageait à l'étranger.

Retour ordonné et enquête à mener dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 19]

Le risque encouru par l'enfant devait faire l'objet d'une enquête dans le cadre de la procédure de garde en cours en Australie.  Il convenait de protéger l'enfant jusqu'à la conclusion de cette enquête. Toutefois cette nécessité de protection ne devait pas mener au rejet de la demande de retour car le risque était lié non pas au retour en Australie mais à un droit de visite et d'hébergement non surveillé.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 361]

La Cour rejeta les allégations selon lesquelles l'enfant était victime d'abus sexuels de la part du concubin de la mère de nature à déclencher le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b). Pour rejeter l'application de l'article 13(1)(b), la Cour avait relevé que les autorités suédoises étaient conscientes de ce risque d'abus et avaient pris des mesures précises de nature à protéger l'enfant à son retour : elle serait placée dans un foyer d'analyse avec sa mère. Si la mère refusait, alors l'enfant serait ôtée à sa famille et placée dans un foyer. Elle fit également remarquer que la mère s'était séparée de son concubin.

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 360]

Lors de son analyse concernant la question de savoir si l'allégation selon laquelle le père aurait abusé sexuellement de sa fille constituait une barrière au retour de l'enfant, la Cour a fait observer, d'une part, qu'un des objectifs de la Convention de La Haye était d'empêcher que le for devant se prononcer sur le retour de l'enfant soit choisi arbitrairement. La Cour observa, d'autre part, que la crédibilité des allégations devrait être analysée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle des époux car il s'agissait de l'État le mieux placé, et qu'aucun risque grave de danger n'existait si la mère accompagnait les enfants et organisait des conditions de vie dans leur meilleur intérêt. Dans ces conditions le retour pouvait être ordonné.

Irlande
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 389]

La Cour suprême irlandaise a noté qu'à première vue la preuve avait été apportée que les enfants avaient été victimes d'abus sexuels de la part du père et ne devaient pas être placés sous sa garde. Cependant, le tribunal avait estimé à tort que le retour des enfants en lui-même constituerait un risque grave. Au vu des engagements pris par le père, il n'y aurait pas de risque grave à renvoyer les enfants dans leur foyer familial sous la seule garde de la mère.

- Enquête à mener dans l'État de refuge :

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 595]

La Cour d'appel critiqua le fait que le retour était soumis à une condition sur laquelle les juridictions de la Chine (RAS Hong Kong) n'avaient aucun contrôle (ni aucune compétence). La condition posée étant l'action d'un tiers (l'Autorité centrale suisse). La Cour estima que jusqu'à ce que les allégations se révèlent dénuées de fondement, il n'était pas admissible que la cour, dans l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire, décide de renvoyer l'enfant dans le milieu dans lequel les abus s'étaient produits.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir.2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 459]

La Cour d'appel du premier ressort estima que le premier juge aurait dû faire preuve d'une grande prudence avant de renvoyer un enfant alors même qu'il y avait de sérieuses raisons de croire qu'il avait fait l'objet d'abus sexuels. La Cour d'appel ajouta que les juges devaient se montrer particulièrement prudents dans leur tentative de garantir la protection de l'enfant par la voie d'engagements dans des situations analogues.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 971]

Le Tribunal fédéral avait demandé à un pédiatre spécialisé dans les questions de maltraitance, d'abus sexuels sur enfants et de pédopornographie de se prononcer sur la question de savoir si les photos des enfants constituaient des photos pornographiques et si les troubles comportementaux des enfants traduisaient un abus sexuel. L'expert conclut qu'aucun élément ne permettait de déduire que le père était pédophile, qu'il était attiré sexuellement par des enfants ni que les photos étaient pornographiques. Elle approuva l'enquête allemande et constata que les conclusions allemandes étaient conformes aux observations effectuées. Elle ajouta que les symptômes développés par les enfants étaient causés par le stress que la séparation très difficile des parents leur causait. Elle ajouta encore que les enfants ne devaient pas être soumis à d'autres évaluations en vue d'établir un abus sexuel car cela ne ferait qu'ajouter à leur niveau de stress déjà dangereusement élevé.

- Retour refusé :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Q., Petitioner, [2001] SLT 243, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 341]

Le juge estima qu'il était possible que les allégations d'abus fussent exactes. De même, il n'était pas impossible qu'en cas de retour, l'enfant puisse être amené à avoir un contact non surveillé avec l'auteur potentiel de ces abus. Elle observa toutefois que les autorités d'autres États parties à la Convention de La Haye sont susceptibles de fournir une protection adéquate à l'enfant. En conséquence, le retour d'un enfant pouvait être ordonné même en cas d'allégations d'abus sexuels. En l'espèce cependant, le juge estima qu'au regard des différentes procédures ouvertes en France, il semblait que les juridictions compétentes n'étaient pas en mesure de protéger l'enfant, ou pas disposées à le faire. Elle en a déduit que le retour de l'enfant l'exposerait à un risque grave de danger physique ou psychologique ou la placerait de toute autre manière dans une situation intolérable.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 597]

Ces conclusions rendaient inopérants les arguments du père selon lequel les autorités suédoises pourraient prendre des mesures pour limiter tout danger supplémentaire une fois les enfants rentrées dans ce pays. La Cour d'appel décida qu'en ces circonstances, l'application de l'article 13(1)(b) n'exigeait pas que la question des engagements du père soit posée, pas davantage que celle des mesures à prendre par les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle.

(Auteur : Peter McEleavy, Avril 2013)

Difficultés financières

L'article 13(1) b) et les difficultés financières

Dans de nombreux États contractants les juridictions ont adopté une approche stricte lorsqu'il a été soutenu que le parent demandeur (et par conséquent l'enfant) serait mis dans une situation financière difficile si une ordonnance de retour était rendue.

Australie
Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 293]

Le fait que la mère ne pouvait accompagner l'enfant en Angleterre pour des raisons financières, ou autres, ne justifiait pas que les juges australiens se départissent de l'obligation claire qui pèse sur eux en application de la Convention.

Canada
Y.D. v. J.B., [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que.C.A.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 369]

La mère alléguait que les difficultés financières du père conduiraient à exposer les enfants à un risque grave de danger. La juge estima au contraire que l'existence de difficultés financières ne justifiait pas le refus de retour des enfants. Selon le juge : « les États signataires de la Convention ne cherchaient pas à protéger uniquement les enfants dont les parents sont aisés, en laissant à l'abandon les enfants de parents moins riches. Victimes d'enlèvement, ces enfants aussi doivent pouvoir faire l'objet d'une décision de retour ». [Traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Allemagne
7 UF 39/99, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 821].

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans des arrêts anciens, la cour d'appel a généralement rejeté les arguments selon lesquels les difficultés pécuniaires pourraient caractériser une situation intolérable au sens de l'article 13(1) b).

Re A. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] Fam 106 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 48].

Dépendre des allocations de l'État ne peut être en soi considéré comme une situation intolérable.

B. v. B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam. 32 (C.A.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 10].

Les difficultés financières et de logement n'empêchaient pas le prononcé d'une ordonnance de retour.

Dans Re M. (Abduction: Undertakings) [1995] 1 FLR 1021 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 20], il a été suggéré qu'une exception pouvait être établie lorsque des jeunes enfants étaient susceptibles de se trouver sans foyer, soit qu'ils bénéficient des  prestations sociales versées par l'État soit qu'ils n'en bénéficient pas. La dépendance financière aux prestations sociales versées par l'État israélien ou l'État anglais ne saurait constituer une situation intolérable.

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Starr v. Starr 1999 SLT 335, 1998 SCLR (Notes) 775 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 195];

Suisse
5A_285/2007 /frs, Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 955];

Zimbabwe
Secretary For Justice v. Parker 1999 (2) ZLR 400 (H) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZW 340].

Pour un exemple d'affaire dans laquelle une ordonnance de non retour a été rendue sur la basée de circonstances financières, voir :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse C. v. C. 2003 S.L.T. 793 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 998].

Ce fut également un facteur pertinent dans l'affaire suivante:

Pays-Bas
De directie Preventie, optredend voor zichzelf en namens Y (de vader /the father) against X (de moeder/ the mother) (7 February 2001, ELRO nr.AA9851 Zaaknr:813-H-00) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL 314].

Jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CourEDH)

Enlèvements par le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant

La question de la position à adopter dans les situations où le parent ravisseur est le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, et qu'il menace de ne pas rentrer avec l'enfant dans l'État de résidence habituelle si une ordonnance de retour est rendue, est controversée.

De nombreux États contractants ont adopté une position très stricte au terme de laquelle le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b) n'a été retenu que dans des circonstances exceptionnelles quand l'argument tendant au non-retour de l'enfant était invoqué. Voir :

Autriche
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

Dans cette affaire, les circonstances exceptionnelles ont résulté en une ordonnance de non-retour. La mère faisait face à une menace véritable qui lui faisait craindre légitimement pour sa sécurité si elle retournait en Israël. Elle avait été emmenée en Israël sous un faux prétexte, y avait été vendue à la mafia russe puis revendue au père, qui l'avait forcée à se prostituer. Elle avait alors été enfermée, battue par le père, violée et menacée. La mère était dans un réel état de peur, on ne pouvait attendre d'elle qu'elle retourne en Israël. Il aurait été complètement inapproprié de renvoyer l'enfant sans sa mère vers un père qui avait acheté et vendu des femmes, et dirigé des activités de prostitution.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

Toutefois, dans un jugement plus récent rendu par une Cour d'appel anglaise, la position adoptée en 1989 dans l'affaire C. v. C. fut précisée. Voir :

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Dans cette affaire, il fut décidé que le refus de la mère de retourner dans l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle était susceptible de déclencher le jeu de l'exception en ce qu'il n'était pas imputable à un comportement excessif mais à une maladie dont elle souffrait. Il convient de noter qu'une ordonnance de retour fut malgré tout rendue. On peut également mentionner à ce sujet les décisions de la Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni dans Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] et Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. Dans cette dernière affaire, il fut accepté que les angoisses d'une mère concernant son retour satisfaisaient le niveau de risque requis à l'article 13(1)(b) et justifiaient le jeu de cette exception quoiqu'elles n'étaient pas fondées sur un risque objectif. L'ampleur de ces angoisses était telle qu'elles lui auraient probablement causé des difficultés à assumer normalement son rôle de parent en cas de retour, au point de rendre la situation de l'enfant intolérable.

Allemagne
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Auparavant, une position beaucoup plus libérale avait été adoptée :

Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suisse
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Etats-Unis d'Amérique
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position adoptée quant aux arguments tendant au non-retour de l'enfant a varié :

Australie
En Australie, la jurisprudence ancienne témoigne d'une position initialement très stricte. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

Dans l'affaire State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], le Tribunal de Melbourne avait estimé qu'il y avait bien un risque grave de danger alors que la mère refusait de rentrer avec l'enfant. En l'espèce, toutefois, la mère ne pouvait pas retourner aux États-Unis, État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant, car les autorités de ce pays lui refusaient l'entrée sur le territoire.

Plus récemment, suite à la décision de la Cour suprême qui avait été saisie des appels joints dans D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], les tribunaux ont accordé une attention plus particulière à la situation à laquelle l'enfant allait devoir faire face après son retour.

Pour une illustration de ce phénomène dans une affaire où le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant refusait de rentrer avec lui dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle, voir : Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

France
Dans la jurisprudence française, l'interprétation permissive de l'article 13(1)(b) qui prévalait initialement a été remplacée par une interprétation beaucoup plus stricte. Pour une illustration de l'interprétation permissive initiale. Voir :

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

et pour une illustration de l'interprétation plus stricte, voir :

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israël
Il existe dans la jurisprudence israélienne des exemples contrastés du traitement des exceptions au retour :

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]  contrastant avec :

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Pologne
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Cour Suprême nota qu'il ne serait pas conforme à l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant de la priver des soins de sa mère, si celle-ci décidait de rester en Pologne. La Cour affirma cependant que si l'enfant devait rester en Pologne, il serait tout autant contraire à son intérêt d'être privée des soins de son père. Tenant compte de ces considérations, la Cour conclut qu'il ne pouvait pas être présumé qu'ordonner le retour de l'enfant la placerait dans une situation intolérable.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Cour suprême précisa que l'argument fréquemment avancé de la potentielle séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur ne justifiait pas, en principe, le jeu de l'exception. La Cour jugea qu'en l'absence d'obstacles objectifs au retour du parent ravisseur, on pouvait présumer que celui-ci accordait plus de valeur à ses propres intérêts qu'à ceux de l'enfant.

La Cour ajouta que la crainte pour le parent ravisseur de voir sa responsabilité pénale engagée ne constituait pas un obstacle objectif au retour, puisque celui-ci aurait dû avoir conscience des conséquences de ses actions. La situation était cependant plus compliquée s'agissant des nourrissons. La Cour estima que le lien spécial unissant la mère et le nourrisson ne rendait la séparation possible qu'en cas exceptionnel, et ce même en l'absence d'obstacle objectif au retour de la mère dans l'État de résidence habituelle. La Cour jugea que lorsque la mère d'un nourrisson refusait de revenir avec lui, quelles qu'en soient les raisons, alors le retour devait être refusé sur la base de l'article 13(1)(b). D'après les faits de l'espèce, le retour avait été ordonné.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
Il existe des décisions de la CourEDH adoptant une position stricte relativement à la compatibilité des exceptions de la Convention de La Haye avec la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH). Dans certaines de ces affaires, des arguments relatifs à l'exception pour risque grave étaient considérés, y compris lorsque le parent ravisseur indiquait son refus d'accompagner le retour de l'enfant. Voir :

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH confirma un recours du père à qui l'enfant avait été enlevé selon lequel les juridictions turques avaient commis une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH en refusant d'ordonner le retour de son enfant. La CourEDH jugea que, bien que le très jeune âge d'un enfant soit un critère à prendre en compte dans la détermination de son intérêt, cela ne constituait pas en soi, selon les exigences de la Convention de La Haye, un motif suffisant pour justifier le rejet d'une demande de retour.

Il a parfois été fait recours à des témoignages d'expert afin de faciliter l'évaluation des conséquences potentielles de la séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur. Voir :

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Cependant, il faut également noter que, depuis la décision de la Grande Chambre dans l'affaire Neulinger et Shuruk c Suisse, il est des exemples où une approche moins stricte est suivie. Dans le contexte d'une demande de retour, ce dernier jugement avait placé l'accent sur l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant enlevé et sur le fait de vérifier que les autorités nationales compétentes avaient conduit un examen détaillé de la situation familiale dans son ensemble ainsi qu'une appréciation équilibrée et raisonnable de tous les intérêts en jeu. Voir :

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; et décision de la Grand Chamber X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH estima à la majorité que le retour d'un enfant aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique entrainerait une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH. Il fut jugé que le processus de prise de décision de la Cour d'appel belge, en ce qui concerne l'article 13(1)(b), n'avait pas satisfait aux exigences procédurales posées par l'article 8 de la CEDH. Les deux juges dissidents notèrent cependant que le danger visé par l'article 13 ne saurait résulter de la seule séparation de l'enfant et du parent ravisseur.

(Auteur: Peter McEleavy, avril 2013)

Sauvegarde des droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.